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Derick Crucius

Shooting ESTAR based stock (3383 & 3378)

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Hey everyone,

I wanted to see if anyone had any tips on shooting ESTAR based film in a bolex (or similar) camera? From my understanding, polyester film is long pitched as far as perforations go and it is also a very strong base. 

I know some of you would not recommend using it in camera, but I have seen it done. I wanted to ask if there was a specific way I should load the camera or if I could simply autoload as normal? I ask because i've been told that if the camera jams, polyester film could potentially break my camera which would mean repairs 😥.

Also, whats a good recommended ASA to rate both 3383 & 3378?

Thanks in advance!

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The pitch shouldn't be a problem- it's only relevant, and then marginally, to high-speed cameras.

If the camera jammed you'd almost certainly hear that something was wrong before any damage occurred.

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I think you'd be fine with a Bolex anyway - no registration pins and the pull down claw simply slides back and forth rather than being a cam design that could be damaged if it missed a perf.

Mono No Aware in NY have done workshops using that stock in Bolexes, you could contact them about what ASA rating they recommend and other questions you have.

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It does not work in 50 foot magazines every time, all of the time. Mostly it fails and makes vertically smeared images. However, it does work in other cameras reversed or as negative. My youtube channel has playlists for it. /studiocarter1

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Thanks so much everyone, sorry for the late response.

Just one more question, I understand that Estar based stocks density is different than acetate based. Does this mean that the film plane may be slightly further back? Would this affect the focus of my images on my Bolex rex 4 even if the image is sharp in the viewfinder? Or is this not really a concern?

Thanks in advance!

-Derick

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Also, one last question. Could i run this stock at 24fps in my bolex h16 rex 4 without issues of jamming? I was told to avoid high speeds.

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Some confusion. The density of a grey film base can only be of concern when you want to use a behind-the-film reflex finder. Zeiss-Ikon Movikon 16 is a camera having that feature.

The photographic coating lies always next to the aperture plate, no difference among film stocks. The last film that was used emulsion back was Kodacolor film which was discontinued in 1935.

You should avoid to run the camera at high speeds without film.

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Thank you very much for clarifying, Simon. I also have some 2253 & Shellburst film that i'd like to experiment with that are both Estar based so this clears up a lot of confusion (and worry)

I know not to run the goold ol h16 at high speeds without film, but I just want to be sure that if shooting on Estar based stock, that i could run at 24fps without worry of jamming and breaking the mechanism (provided that the film is loaded properly). Should this be of any concern?

 

As always, thanks so much for the input, its appreciated.

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If you have a jam with polyester film in the camera, it’s not the film. The perforators at Kodak cannot help but cut hole rows as precisely as within half a thou in two directions, hole after hole. If your camera is well adjusted and correctly lubricated, it will transport film at any frame rate. You must bent something to provoke a failure. So everything is fine.

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4 hours ago, Simon Wyss said:

If you have a jam with polyester film in the camera, it’s not the film. The perforators at Kodak cannot help but cut hole rows as precisely as within half a thou in two directions, hole after hole. If your camera is well adjusted and correctly lubricated, it will transport film at any frame rate. You must bent something to provoke a failure. So everything is fine.

Perfect, thanks so much Simon. I appreciate the advice. I’m looking forward to using some of this stock. 

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