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Dimitrios Koukas

Processing methods

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Let's say we have a 35mm original, cut to cut and with some dissolves like 10 and some fades let's say 5 fade outs.

What u would suggest, go for A-B roll, or just give the effects only for optical printing Internegative -interpositive and then ''patch'' them, (add them)in the cut to cut single roll?

Would be this the best for the films quality, or the I/N -I/P would be ''jump out'' to someones eye?

 

Dimitrios Koukas

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Let's say we have a 35mm original, cut to cut and with some dissolves like 10 and some fades let's say 5 fade outs.

What u would suggest, go for A-B roll, or just give the effects only for optical printing Internegative -interpositive and then ''patch'' them, (add them)in the cut to cut single roll?

Would be this the best for the films quality, or the I/N -I/P would be ''jump out'' to someones eye?

 

Dimitrios Koukas

 

Hi,

 

I would go A-B roll!

 

Stephen

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Let's say we have a 35mm original, cut to cut and with some dissolves like 10 and some fades let's say 5 fade outs.

What u would suggest, go for A-B roll, or just give the effects only for optical printing Internegative -interpositive and then ''patch'' them, (add them)in the cut to cut single roll?

Would be this the best for the films quality, or the I/N -I/P would be ''jump out'' to someones eye?

 

Dimitrios Koukas

 

For simple fades and dissolves, cutting A/B rolls usually offers the best image quality, although there may be a slight difference in the ramp of the fade between one being done on a continuous contact printer on A/B rolls, and one done on an optical printer:

 

http://www.acvl.org/handbook/3c.htm

 

Modern intermediate films like Kodak VISION Color Intermediate Film 5242 produce duplicate negatives that intercut very well with the original negative --- cut-ins no longer "jump out" with a "dupey look" and grain increase as they did in films made a few decades ago in the days of 5253.

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Optical fades and dissolves would not stand out provided the duplication was done properly.

 

A&B rolls are a natural way to do this in 16mm, as you have A&B rolls anyway, for the checkerboard cutting. For 35mm, it might depend on how many fades & dissolves you want, how many prints you intend to make from the original negative, and whether the lab charges extrs for the B-rolls.

 

Also remember that optical, or digital, fades & dissolves can be any length, whereas the A&B roll method is restricted to 16,24,32,48, 64 or 96 frames in length, and there has to be a specific "recovery time" between the end of one transition and the beginning of the next.

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