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Found 2 results

  1. Hi! We’re shooting a white void type scene in a studio. An example of a “white void” scene is this. It won’t be completely a “white void” as the scene will reveal that it’s shot in a studio with a white backdrop. The studio looks like this. What is a nice way to light this kind of scene? I’m thinking of lighting the studio backdrop with lights with soft boxes or lanterns from the ceiling directed below and at the back of and sides of the backdrop then 1 light each with a huge soft box situated outside the “white void” on opposite ends (for the actors). For the lights outside the white void, will a strong light with soft box be enough or a strong light with a huge diffusion cloth be better? To achieve a soft almost no contrast lighting in the scene, I know I have to fill as much as shadows as possible but will there be a risk of it looking too flat? Or should I just meter one side of the face of an actor just to make sure that one side of the face is a bit darker than the other? Honestly, I think it wouldn't be that very hard to light this given that the backdrop is already white so all of the shadows are easily filled in. But still, it's my first time to shoot and light this kind of scene and I would just like to know if there are any precautions and tips you can give me. Thank you!
  2. Hello! I’m shooting a short skit for a restaurant promo video. I’m the cinematographer and someone will direct. It’s a low-budget project. The skit is for Grandparent’s Day. A kid is being spoiled at the restaurant with food as his mother looks on. It’s mostly shown through closeups until it is revealed in the wide shot that the grandmother is the one spoiling her grandkid. It’s a simple setup with the family just sitting on a long table, no standing, no moving around. The mood is light-hearted and comedic. We want a high-key look but our lighting gear is pretty limited. Here is a list: 1x1 Bi-color led light (with softbox and grid) 1x1 Bi-color led light (with softbox and grid) Portable led light 85 watt daylight bulb with chinaball 201s, CTBs, CTOs, orange sodium vapor gel, ND gel 5-sided reflector We’re shooting with a Sony a6500 with Rokinon/Samyang 14mm and 50mm lenses. And a Canon 70-200mm (for food shots). And we might be able to rent an Aputure 120D with a light dome. Here are photos of the location. There is a small part of the restaurant where there are windows but there is also a possibility where we would shoot at the inner part of the restaurant where there are no windows. Here are the complete photos of the location: https://www.evernote.com/l/ANwMH-Y3EplFWppkEhcC6xZdoZQ7EmxGZ4s I would like to ask if you have any lighting ideas with the gear that we have. Thank you!
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