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Found 6 results

  1. The Reel Thing, a symposium focusing on the preservation and restoration of audio visual collections, will open with the U.S. premiere of a 4K restoration of Billy Wilder’s “The Apartment” (1960), which won five Oscars including Best Picture. A recently restored version of Vittorio De Sica’s “Bicycle Thieves” will also be shown during the three-day event, which runs August 23-25 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood. The Reel Thing offers insight into the latest preservation and restoration efforts throughout the motion picture community, and brings together experts who are using the latest technologies to make cinema’s legacy accessible for future audiences. In addition to restored screenings, this year’s program addresses topics of vital interest to preservation and restoration professionals around the globe. Case studies will examine the specifics of project restorations, and thematic sessions will look at the many challenges and solutions being utilized in real-world preservation efforts. For the full program and speaker lineup, visit www.the-reel-thing.org. Co-founded by Grover Crisp and Michael Friend, The Reel Thing was developed to address the wide range of critical issues facing archivists, technicians, asset managers and curators of image and sound. Sessions examine problems and solutions involving digital creation workflows (2K/4K/6K/8K+HDR), data storage access and recovery, image scanning and recording, image resolution metrics, traditional video and audio preservation, and restoration issues from a variety of perspectives. The Reel Thing creates a common ground for discussion and evaluation of methodologies, and deployment of both traditional and emerging technologies. The Reel Thing supports the programs and services of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). For more information or to register, visit www.the-reel-thing.org. Discounts are available for industry groups and students.
  2. The Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) has announced a robust program for its annual conference, which brings together over 600 experts to share perspectives on the latest methodologies and technologies being used in the acquisition, preservation, restoration, exhibition and use of audiovisual media. The event runs Nov. 30 to Dec. 2 at the InterContinental New Orleans, and is preceded by two days of workshops, including a Community Archiving Fair, a Hack Day, and a presentation of The Reel Thing, a technical symposium that explores recent restoration projects. A detailed schedule and session descriptions can be found on the AMIA conference website: www.amiaconference.net. Over 40 seminars will address topics such as the management of efficient transfer and migration workflows; strategies for licensing archives; updates on tools and processes in annotation, metadata, and modeling; approaches for handling and protecting rare elements; and case studies on the preservation of important analog and digital collections. Screenings will include AMIA’s Archival Screening Night – a program of rarely seen clips from archives around the world; “Dawson City: Frozen in Time” followed by a Q&A with director Bill Morrison; and “Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People,” a documentary offering devastating insights into the origins of stereotypic images and their development at key points in U.S. history. This year, AMIA shines a spotlight on efforts being made to preserve and provide access to underrepresented archives. Specialists from Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Asian/Pacific American Institute, Israel Film Archive, Jack G. Shaheen Collection and the Shoah Foundation, to name a few, will share their experiences and offer their expertise. Highlights include: · The New Preservationists: How Documentary Filmmakers are Excavating Rare Media Artifacts to Tell Their Stories – A new emphasis on archival-based programming from Netflix, Amazon, HBO, Hulu, ESPN, and other international players has shined a new light on archives. With Academy Award® and Emmy®-nominated filmmaker Robert Stone and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Shola Lynch, this session will explore the craft of the archive-inspired film and show how these projects themselves are vehicles for preservation efforts. · Reel News: Broadcast Videotape and the Historical Record of Resistance – A significant portion of moving image records from U.S.-based social movements in the 20th century, including the struggle for African American, Chicano/a, LGBTQ, and civil and human rights, exists on endangered 2-inch videotape. This panel will screen footage and illuminate the vital, socially relevant content emended on tapes, while providing attendees with strategies for developing initiatives at their own institutions for preserving this material and presenting it to the public. · Let the Computer and the Public do the Metadata Work! – The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), with Pop Up Archive, has created more than 71,000 transcripts of historic public broadcasting recordings using the open source Kaldi speech-to-text software. At this panel, WGBH will share a game called FixIt to crowdsource correction of speech-to-text generated transcripts, and panelists will discuss potential computational linguistic tools and methodologies to enhance discoverability of digital media collections. · The Great Migration: A Public Digitization Workflow – The Great Migration is a public digitization program initiated by the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Visitors are invited to bring their home movies, on any format, to the museum and have them inspected and digitally scanned by NMAAHC media preservation staff. This session highlights how museum preservation efforts and public education coalesce, revealing basic steps for personal digital archiving while building the nation's largest research collection of African American home movies. “Every year, AMIA’s annual conference brings together the largest gathering of the restoration/preservation community who are making incredible progress in their work to ensure treasures from the past are accessible for the future,” said AMIA President Andrea Kalas. “AMIA members are the cultural caretakers of important audiovisual media, and this event marks an incomparable opportunity to learn and connect with a worldwide contingency of professionals in the field.” To register, visit the AMIA Conference website for full details: http://www.amiaconference.net/
  3. Los Angeles Edition of Symposium to Address Confluence of Film Restoration and Digital Technologies in Service of Future-Proofing Cinema’s Legacies for Generations to Come The Reel Thing, a symposium dedicated to addressing the preservation and restoration of audio visual collections, will open with the U.S. premiere of a new restoration of the Oscar®-nominated 1960 film “La Verite” (“The Truth”). Two additional new 4K restorations also will be shown during The Reel Thing, including the U.S. premiere of Howard Hawks’ “Scarface” and the world premiere of Alex Cox’s “Sid and Nancy.” The Reel Thing takes place August 24 - 26 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood. The event offers insight into the latest preservation and restoration efforts throughout the motion picture community, and brings together experts who are using the latest technologies to make cinema’s legacy accessible for future audiences. Registration is now open, with discounts for industry groups and students, at www.the-reel-thing.org. In addition to restored screenings at The Reel Thing, this year’s program addresses vital topics of interest to preservation and restoration professionals around the globe, including sessions on the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in repairing assets; the explosion of digital formats and how to manage deliverables; optical sound recovery; and modern workflow solutions for safeguarding projects. Case studies will examine the restoration of “Scarface” (1932), the silent film “Behind the Door” (1919), and “The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez” (1982). An in-depth look at how ACES was used to reformat and archive “The Troop” rounds out these discussions. Speakers are expected to include Nicholas Bergh, End Point Audio; film director Marcus Dillistone; Miki Fukushima, Paramount Digital Archive; Mike Inchalik, PurePix Images; Wojtek Janio, MTI Film; Inna Kozlov, Algosoft Tech USA; Jim Lindner, Media Matters LLC; Josef Lindner, Academy Film Archive, AMPAS; Simon Lund, Cineric, Inc.; Andy Maltz, Science and Technology Council, AMPAS; Alexander Petukhov, University of Georgia; Michael Pogorzelski, Academy Film Archive, AMPAS; Peter Schade, NBCUniversal; Linda Tadic, Digital Bedrock; Sean Vilbert, Paramount Digital Archive; and Jason Wall, Metromedia Radio.* An opening night reception will be followed by the screening of “La Verite.” Directed by acclaimed French director Henri-Georges Clouzot and starring Brigitte Bardot, “La Verite” follows the trial of a young French woman (Bardot) accused of her lover’s murder. The film was nominated for an Academy Award® for Best Foreign Language Film, and was a box office hit in France. “La Verite” was digitally restored at 4K by Sony Pictures Entertainment in partnership with The Film Foundation and RT Features. Created and co-founded by Grover Crisp and Michael Friend, The Reel Thing supports the programs and services of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). For more information and to register for The Reel Thing, go to www.the-reel-thing.org.
  4. LOS ANGELES (August 15, 2016) - The 38th edition of The Reel Thing, a three-day symposium addressing audio/visual restoration and archiving, will explore the constantly evolving ecosystem of film and digital restoration and preservation. This year's program will examine legacy film restorations and showcase modern technologies being used to futureproof collections and keep them viable for future display and distribution formats. The event will take place August 18-20 at the Academy's Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood. In addition to discussions with industry leaders, premiere screenings of several restored films are scheduled, including the original, uncensored version of John Huston's BEAT THE DEVIL; Marlon Brando's single directorial project ONE-EYED JACKS; and Robert Altman's MCCABE AND MRS. MILLER. Created and co-founded by Grover Crisp, executive vice president of asset management for Sony Pictures, and Michael Friend, director of digital archives and asset management at Sony Pictures, the event supports the programs and services of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). "At The Reel Thing, our presenters continue to demonstrate the recovery of the achievements of the first century of cinema even as we assess the challenges presented by the first decades of digital moving image culture," says Friend. "Ever-more effective tools are being devised to address the mechanical and optical challenges of film restoration, and significant new technologies for the long-term preservation of digital data are rapidly evolving. At the center of this activity, technicians, archivists and the rest of the subjective human audience for cinema continue to examine, refine and redefine our understanding of the notion of preservation for both analog and digital moving image art." "It is an exciting time for the archival community as we address the changing technologies that help to preserve collections and our cultural heritage, whether it is film, audio, video or any flavor of digital you choose," notes Crisp. "Our audience is interested in the problems and potential solutions surrounding how we can cope with the issues we encounter in this still hybrid analog/digital landscape we find ourselves in." Presentations at The Reel Thing will feature expert-guided discussions on such topics as UHD/HDR, scanning, color correction, frame rate adjustment, color space and gamut. Case studies on the approach to preserving legacy films in higher quality standards and the processes applied will highlight several panels. Audio restoration will also be explored, looking at the latest technologies in sound. Speakers are expected to include: Michael Pogorzelski, Academy Film Archive; John Polito, Audio Mechanics; David Marriott, Lynette Duensing and Craig Rogers, Cinelicious; Lee Kline and Ryan Hullings, The Criterion Collection; Chris Reynolds, Deluxe Entertainment Services Group; Steve Kochak, Digital Preservation Laboratories, Inc; Wojtek Janio, Fixafilm; Andrew Oran, FotoKem; Gilles Barberis, L'Immagine Ritrovata; and Snowden Becker, UCLA, among others. For more information and to register for The Reel Thing, go to www.the-reel-thing.org. The symposium offers several registration options, as well as discounts for certain industry groups and students.
  5. In anticipation of World Day for Audiovisual Heritage, filmadvocacy.org posted the following page: http://www.filmadvocacy.org/2013/10/25/unesco-world-day-for-audiovisual-heritage-choices-rights/ on Friday. Some interesting information in there, here is a quote from the page: "It is of the utmost importance that filmmakers around the world continue to have the ability to choose the mediums and technologies that best support the preservation of their works into the future. Well-tested and proven technologies that facilitate this goal must continue to remain available. UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage on October 27th, 2013 is an opportune time to highlight the critical importance of maintaining choice in how audiovisual works are preserved and presented, framed in terms relevant to the artistic rights of filmmakers. Article 19 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948 guarantees the Right to Freedom of Expression for all and underpins the right of filmmakers to choose the mediums by which they communicate their ideas through their works. This extends from production and postproduction, through exhibition and into preservation. Article 19 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948 Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers. It follows that attempts to limit choice of medium, to restrict diversity, and to narrow options in this area are not only culturally damaging and unjust – they contravene fundamental human rights." The above is just a part, you should read the whole page and the associated links before forming an opinion.
  6. The Digital Moving Image Archives Guide for Independent Filmmakers launched a few days ago: http://dmia.drupalgardens.com This website has been set up in collaboration with the Association of Moving Image Archivists and is modelled after filmforever.org but purely for digital imaging. Please check it out.
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