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  1. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has chosen two honorees to be feted for their body of work at the 33rd ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Robert Richardson, ASC will receive the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award, and Jeff Jur, ASC will be bestowed the org’s Career Achievement in Television Award. The presentations will be made at the annual ASC Awards gala on February 9, 2019, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. The event will also pay tribute to the society’s centennial in 2019. ASC President Kees van Oostrum notes, “Celebrating the accomplishments of exceptionally talented cinematographers like Bob Richardson for his innovative approach to feature films, and Jeff Jur for his brilliant interpretations in the world of television drama, is especially important in today’s day and age of cinematography. As we celebrate our 100th anniversary, I cannot imagine better role models, as both have inspired us, and their work continues to embolden the next generation of cinematographers.” Richardson’s extensive career has spanned nearly four decades and counting. Along the way, he has garnered three Academy Awards® for his cinematography on Hugo (2012), The Aviator (2005), and JFK (1992), in addition to six Oscar® nominations (The Hateful Eight, Django Unchained, Inglourious Basterds, Snow Falling on Cedars, Born on the Fourth of July, Platoon) and four BAFTAs (Hugo, Inglourious Basterds, The Aviator, Platoon). He has worked alongside some of the most renowned director’s in cinema, including Oliver Stone, Martin Scorsese, and Quentin Tarantino. His most recent film is A Private War, in select theaters now, with Once Upon a Time in Hollywood slated for release next year. Richardson began shooting documentaries in the 1980s. His photography on Crossfire for an English TV station caught the eye of Stone, who enlisted Richardson for Salvador. That led to Platoon, and the beginning of a prolific credit list that includes Wall Street, The Doors, A Few Good Men, Natural Born Killers, Casino, Nixon, The Horse Whisperer, both Kill Bill movies, The Good Shepherd, Eat Pray Love, and Live by Night, among others. Born in Massachusetts, Richardson fell in love with movies and studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, before advancing to the American Film Institute in the late 1970s. He apprenticed with such legendary cinematographers as Sven Nykvist, ASC, FSF and Nestor Almendros, ASC, and continues to amass feature and documentary credits, demonstrating amazing artistry in everything he shoots. Jur has received numerous accolades for his wide range of television credits. He collected Emmy® Awards for his artistry on HBO’s Carnivale (2004) and for HBO’s Bessie (2016), in addition to another nomination for Carnivale in 2005. Jur’s work has also been recognized by the ASC, having won Outstanding Achievement Awards for the Showtime movie Last Call (2003) and Carnivale (2004), and earning nominations for Carnivale (2006), ABC’s Flashforward (2010), and Bessie. Jur studied film at Columbia College in Chicago. After school, he stayed in Chicago, where he was a gaffer and assistant cameraman on commercials, industrial films and documentaries. He photographed a number of American Playhouse telefilms, including Any Friend of Nicholas Nickleby Is a Friend of Mine from 1980 to 1984. In between TV projects, he went on to shoot feature films, such as Dirty Dancing, The Big Picture, The Last Seduction, How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Panic, Joy Ride, and My Big Fat Greek Wedding, among others. Jur’s prolific resume includes episodes of the series Invasion (ABC), Dirty Sexy Money (ABC), Perception (TNT), Dexter (Showtime), Resurrection (ABC), Halt & Catch Fire (AMC), Colony (USA), The Catch (ABC), Westworld (HBO), Lodge 49 (AMC), and How to Get Away With Murder (ABC). He also has an impressive list of television movies from Running Mates (HBO), Zooman (Showtime), Murder: Live! (NBC), and First Time Felon (HBO), to Alone (Showtime), On Thin Ice (Lifetime), and Reconstruction (NBC). For information regarding the 33rd ASC Awards, visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333.
  2. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) named the 2018 Student Heritage Award winners during a ceremony at the organization’s clubhouse in Hollywood on October 13. Three student filmmakers were honored for demonstrating exceptional abilities in cinematography based on their submitted work. The competition is designed to showcase rising talent and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. The 2018 winners are: ASC Sol Negrin Student Heritage Award – Graduate Category: Steven Breckon for A Place to Stay, American Film Institute (AFI) ASC Gerald Hirschfield Student Heritage Award – Undergraduate Category: Matthew Hayward for The Latent Image, Columbia College Chicago ASC Haskell Wexler Student Documentary Award: Alejandro Cortes Sanchez for Adrift, School of Visual Arts NYC A panel of ASC members judged the entries, and the winners were selected from 13 nominees. “The future of cinematography promises to be exciting, especially after seeing the level of work coming from this year’s submissions,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “The skill and artistry of the next generation should be an inspiration to all of us who create and capture images every day.” The ASC Student Heritage Awards are unique, as they also celebrate the memory of revered cinematographers and are re-named for esteemed ASC members each year. Negrin was nominated for five Emmy Awards — three for his work on the detective drama Kojak, one for the telefilm The Last Tenant, and one for an episode of the series Baker’s Dozen. His cinematography in television commercials also earned four Clio Awards. Negrin received the ASC Presidents Award in 2010 in recognition of not only his expertise behind the camera, but for being an ambassador of the art and craft of cinematography. Hirschfeld was honored with the ASC Presidents Award in 2007. His reputation for being a precise, exacting perfectionist led to his first major feature assignment, shooting the Cold War drama Fail-Safe for director Sidney Lumet. He would go on to shoot some 40 feature films, including The Incident, Goodbye Columbus, Cotton Comes to Harlem, Diary of a Mad Housewife, Young Frankenstein, Two Minute Warning, The World’s Greatest Lover, The Bell Jar, Neighbors, My Favorite Year and To Be or Not to Be. Wexler began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian throughout his career. He earned an Academy Award® in 1966 for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and a second Oscar® in 1976 for Bound for Glory. He also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. Many ASC Student Heritage Award winners have gone on to have successful careers in filmmaking, and several have been invited to be ASC members themselves. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, and follow them on Instagram (@the_asc), or join American Cinematographer on Facebook, Twitter (@AmericanCine), and Instagram (@american_cinematographer). The 33rd Annual ASC Awards take place February 9, 2019. The student winners will be commemorated during the gala as well.
  3. The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is now taking submissions for the television competition of its 33rd Annual ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography. The event, which will also salute the organization’s 100th anniversary, takes place February 9, 2019, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland, and winners will be announced in all categories. Three categories comprise the TV awards: • Episode of a Television Series – Commercial (half hour and one hour) • Episode of a Television Series – Non-Commercial (half hour and one hour) • Motion Picture, Miniseries, or Pilot Made for TV The deadline to enter is November 5 by 5 p.m. (PT). To qualify, shows must have a premiere broadcast date in the United States between November 1, 2017, and October 31, 2018. Entry forms can be downloaded at here on the ASC website. In addition to the TV awards, the ASC gala in February will recognize the year’s best feature film cinematography, as well as lifetime honorees. For a complete timeline of the 33rd ASC Awards, visit this link.
  4. Winners Hail from AFI, LMU and USC LOS ANGELES (October 16, 2017) – The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) announced their annual Student Heritage Award winners Saturday night during a presentation at the organization’s clubhouse in Hollywood. Three student filmmakers were singled out for demonstrating exceptional abilities in cinematography. The competition is designed to highlight the work of emerging talent, and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. The 2017 winners are: ASC Andrew Lesnie Student Heritage Award, Graduate Category Favienne Howsepian from the American Film Institute (AFI) for “Snowplow” ASC Andrew Lesnie Student Heritage Award, Undergraduate Category Logan Fulton from Loyola Marymount University (LMU) for “Widow” ASC Haskell Wexler Student Award, Documentary Category Connor Ellmann from University of Southern California (USC) for “Forever Home” A panel of ASC members judged the entries, and the winners were selected from 13 nominees. “The level of cinematography we see coming from students these days seems to get more exciting and visually challenging each year,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “It’s a testament to the quality and commitment of the younger generation of cinematographers, and promises an exciting future.” The ASC student awards are named in honor of Lesnie and Wexler, revered members of the organization. Lesnie won an Oscar® for best cinematography for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. His work on Doing Time for Patsy Cline earned an ACS Award of Distinction, as well as won the Australian Film Institute and The Australian Film Critics’ awards for best cinematography. He also won the ACS Cinematographer of the Year Award twice, for You Seng and Babe. Wexler earned Academy Awards® for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Bound for Glory, and received additional nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. In 1992, he was honored with the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award. The ASC Student Awards were inaugurated in 1999, with the Documentary category added in 2012. Past winners include Lisa Wiegand, ASC; Lukas Ettlin; Masanobu Takayanagi, ASC; Nelson Cragg; and Benji Bakshi, among many others who have become directors of photography or carved out careers in the filmmaking industry.
  5. Organization to Laud Russell Carpenter, Russell Boyd, Alan Caso and Stephen Lighthill at Annual Gala LOS ANGELES (October 5, 2017) – In recognition of their special contributions to the art of cinematography, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has named four honorees who will be feted at the 32nd ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Russell Carpenter, ASC will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award; Russell Boyd, ASC, ACS will earn the org’s International Award; Alan Caso, ASC will be bestowed the Career Achievement in Television Award; and Stephen Lighthill, ASC will take home the Presidents Award. The presentations will be made at the annual ASC awards gala on February 17, 2018, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. “These artists have accomplished a compelling array of visuals throughout their careers, reaching levels of excellence that inspire cinematographers around the world,” says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. “Not only have they excelled in the art and craft of cinematography but demonstrated leadership and mentorship in their daily work on and off the set.” Carpenter received an Academy Award® for his ground-breaking work on James Cameron’s Titanic (1997), which took home a total of 11 Oscars®. The film also earned best cinematography awards for Carpenter from the ASC and Chicago Film Critics. The cinematographer began his career shooting documentaries and educational films. His breakthrough film, The Lawnmower Man (1992), demonstrated pioneering computer graphics in filmmaking. He’s gone on to photograph a range of genre films including Hard Target, True Lies, The Indian in the Cupboard, The Negotiator, Charlie’s Angels, Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle, Parched, Awake and 21, among others. Carpenter also shoots commercials, creating compelling visuals for such brands as Lexus, AT&T and Microsoft. Most recently, he contributed his cinematographic talents to Peyton Reed’s Ant-Man, and D.J. Caruso’s xXx: Return of Xander Cage. Carpenter is currently shooting the Disney picture, Nicole, with director Marc Lawrence before moving on to the Avatar sequels for Cameron. Boyd is an Oscar® winner for his compelling visuals on Peter Weir’s Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003). He reigns from a small town in Victoria, Australia, where he aspired to be a press photographer but got his start at a weekly Melbourne news program, performing a variety of tasks. After shooting numerous commercials for a production company in Sydney, Boyd transitioned to narrative filmmaking, working with Weir several times during the early days of his career. In addition to Master and Commander, the cinematographer and director have collaborated on Picnic at Hanging Rock, The Last Wave, Gallipoli, The Year of Living Dangerously, and The Way Back. Boyd’s credits also include a wide range of feature and television projects, including Tender Mercies, A Soldier’s Story, Cobb, Tin Cup, Doctor Doolittle, and Ghost Rider. Caso has compiled over 50 television credits, earning two Emmy® nominations for his work on Six Feet Under (2001), as well as nods for Into the West (2005) and George Wallace (1997). The latter also took home an ASC Award, with additional nominations bestowed by the organization for Frankenstein (2004) and Into the West. Caso’s cinematographic contributions to television have made an impact on the annals of the small screen, including The Good Old Boys, Tour of Duty, Blackout Effect, Widows, Running Mates, Master Spy: The Robert Hanssen Story, Blackbeard, Big Love, Dexter, The Americans (pilot), and Hawaii Five-O. His feature credits include First Sunday, Reindeer Games, Muppets From Space, Top of the World and Ed. He is currently directing photography on the TV series For the People for ABC, and recently shot the upcoming pilot for NBC’s Reverie. Lighthill began his career shooting network news and documentaries, including contributions to Oscar®-nominated documentary Berkeley in the ‘60s, Gimme Shelter, and CBS’ 60 Minutes. In recent years, he returned to documentaries with Boffo! Tinseltown's Bombs and Blockbusters, and The Alzheimer's Project: Caregivers. Lighthill’s credits also include independent features and television, such as PBS’ Over-Under Sideways-Down, Hot Summer Winds, Shimmer, HBO’s Vietnam War Story, Earth 2 for NBC, and Nash Bridges for CBS. His contributions to the industry include many years on the ASC Board of Governors, serving as president from 2012–2013, and the National Executive Board of the International Cinematographers Guild (ICG). In 2010, he received the Deluxe Bud Stone Award for Outstanding Educational Contributions to the Art and Craft of Cinematography from the ICG, and the 2010 SMPTE Kodak Educational Award for outstanding contributions in film production education. He is also a regular jury member at the Camerimage cinematography festival in Poland. Lighthill is currently the Senior Filmmaker in Residence: Cinematography at the American Film Institute (AFI) Conservatory. For information regarding the 32nd ASC Awards, visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333.
  6. Organization Sets 2018 Date for Annual Awards Gala The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has opened its call for entries in the television categories for the 32nd Annual ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography, which will be held February 17, 2018, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. The ASC is now accepting submissions in three categories: (1) Episode of a Television Series – Commercial; (2) Episode of a Television Series – Non-Commercial; and (3) Motion Picture, Miniseries, or Pilot Made for TV. The deadline to enter is November 1 by 5 p.m. (PT). To qualify for the ASC TV Awards, shows must have a premiere broadcast date in the United States between November 1, 2016, and October 31, 2017. Entry forms can be downloaded on the ASC website at www.theasc.com/asc/awards/entry-forms. Winners in the television categories at the 31st ASC Awards included Fabian Wagner, ASC, BSC for Game of Thrones, Tod Campbell for Mr. Robot, and Igor Martinovic for The Night Of. In addition to the TV awards, the ASC gala in February will also honor excellence in feature film cinematography, and recognize cinematographers and filmmakers for their contributions to the art and craft of filmmaking throughout their career. For a complete timeline of the 32nd ASC Awards, visit www.theasc.com/asc/awards/dates-deadlines.
  7. LOS ANGELES (December 13, 2016) - Honoring one of Hollywood's biggest icons, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) will bestow their Board of Governors Award on director Denzel Washington on February 4, 2017, during the 31st ASC Awards at Hollywood & Highland's Ray Dolby Ballroom. The organization presents the accolade to individuals in the industry whose body of work has made significant and indelible contributions to cinema. It is the only ASC Award not given to a cinematographer, and is reserved for filmmakers who have been champions for directors of photography and the visual art form. The director made his directorial debut with Antwone Fisher (2002). His second feature, The Great Debaters, followed in 2007. Washington's current project is the critically acclaimed film Fences, written by August Wilson and based on his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, which will be released on Christmas Day. In addition to producing and directing the movie, Washington reprises his original Tony Award®-winning role alongside Viola Davis. "Denzel Washington is an amazing director and actor, and a conscious force in these challenging times," notes ASC President Kees van Oostrum. "A true artist is empowered by the era they live in, and he expresses an awareness of the world around us through his work. It is that strength of character that we honor with the ASC Governors Award." Washington has starred in over 50 films and television shows, in addition to his theater roles and directing credits. He received his first Academy Award® for the historical war drama Glory (1989) and a second for the crime thriller Training Day (2001). He began his career in New York theater productions, and rose to fame when he landed the role of Dr. Phillip Chandler on the NBC long-running hit television series St. Elsewhere. Washington's other television credits include The George McKenna Story, License to Kill and Wilma. When Washington crossed over into the world of film, he garnered critical acclaim for his portrayal of real life figures. He earned his first Oscar® nomination for Cry Freedom (1987), as South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko. From there, he went on to portray Muslim minister and human rights activist Malcolm X in Malcolm X (1992), boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter in The Hurricane (1999), football coach Herman Boone in Remember the Titans (2000), and drug kingpin Frank Lucas in American Gangster (2007). He also starred in Much Ado About Nothing, A Soldier's Story, Crimson Tide, Devil in a Blue Dress, and Inside Man. Washington was mostly recently seen in Antoine Fuqua's remake of The Magnificent Seven and before that, they teamed up for The Equalizer. The actor also appeared in 2 Guns and Unstoppable. Washington is a recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award, which was presented to him at the 73rd Golden Globe Awards earlier this year. He received a Golden Globe nomination yesterday for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture-Drama for Fences. Previous recipients of the ASC Board of Governors Award include Ridley Scott, Barbra Streisand, Harrison Ford, Julia Roberts, Christopher Nolan, Warren Beatty, Francis Ford Coppola, Sally Field, Morgan Freeman, Ron Howard, Sydney Pollack, Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, among many others.
  8. LOS ANGELES (October 17, 2016) - The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) honored three student filmmakers tonight at their annual student awards presentation, held at the organization's clubhouse. The competition is designed to highlight the work of emerging talent, and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. The winners are: ASC Vilmos Zsigmond Student Heritage Award, Graduate Category Andrew Jeric from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts for Prisoner ASC Vilmos Zsigmond Student Heritage Award, Undergraduate Category Emmett Sutherland from the Art Center College of Design for Closer ASC Haskell Wexler Student Award, Documentary Category Colin F. Shepherd of the Rochester Institute of Technology for Into the Microscope A panel of prestigious ASC members judged the entries. Jeric, Sutherland and Shephard were selected from 18 nominees for demonstrating their exceptional abilities in cinematography in their submitted works. "It's exciting to see the incredible level of artistry coming out of film schools," says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. "It was difficult to choose among the large pool of talent, but these students have achieved what our members saw to be a professional level of visual storytelling. We hope to encourage them to continue on their career path in filmmaking." The ASC Student Heritage Awards are renamed annually in memory of an extraordinary ASC member. This year, the awards are dedicated to two cinematic legends: Zsigmond and Wexler. Zsigmond won an Academy Award® for Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and earned additional nominations for The Deer Hunter (1979), The River (1985) and The Black Dahlia (2007). He also won an Emmy® for shooting the HBO movie Stalin (1993). Wexler began his career shooting documentaries and remained a passionate documentarian. He earned Academy Awards for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) and Bound for Glory (1976), and also received nominations for One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (shared with Bill Butler, ASC), Matewan and Blaze. In 1969, Wexler wrote, directed and shot Medium Cool, which is studied by film students worldwide for its cinéma vérité style. The ASC Student Awards were inaugurated in 1999, with the Documentary category added in 2012. Past winners include Lisa Wiegand, ASC; Lukas Ettlin; Masanobu Takayanagi, ASC; Nelson Cragg; and Benji Bakshi, among many others who have become directors of photography or carved out careers in the filmmaking industry.
  9. LOS ANGELES (October 13, 2016) - The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has announced the honorees for the 31st annual ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Edward Lachman, ASC; Ron Garcia, ASC; Philippe Rousselot, ASC, AFC; and Nancy Schreiber, ASC will be recognized for their contributions to the art of cinematography at the organization's awards gala on February 4, 2017, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. Lachman will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award. Garcia will be bestowed with the Career Achievement in Television Award. Rousselot earns the International Award, and Schreiber will take home the Presidents Award. "The work of these individual cinematographers is varied, yet it all exemplifies a stellar level of achievement," says ASC President Kees van Oostrum. "As a group, they also are a prime example of great careers in the industry and, over the years, they have set creative standards of the highest order." Lachman is a revered and award-winning cinematographer who has photographed over 90 titles in narrative, experimental and documentary forms. He has collaborated with directors such as Todd Haynes, Steven Soderbergh, Robert Altman, Paul Schrader, Todd Solondz, Sofia Coppola, Werner Herzog, Wim Wenders, Volker Schlöndorff, Ulrich Seidl, and Jean-Luc Godard, among others. Lachman's work with Haynes on Carol (2015) and Far From Heaven (2002) garnered him Academy Award® nominations, and the HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce (2011) earned him an Emmy® nomination. He has also received the Golden Frog for Carol, the Silver Frog for Far From Heaven, and the Bronze Frog for I'm Not There (2007) at Camerimage, as well as the Director/Cinematographer Golden Frog with Haynes (2011). He is the only American to receive the prestigious Marburg Camera Award in Germany for his body of work. Other accolades for Lachman include Independent Spirit Awards for Far From Heaven and Carol, the British Society of Cinematographers Award for Best Feature Film with Carol, and many honors from film critic associations and film festivals throughout his career. Lachman's many memorable credits include Wiener-Dog, Paradise, Howl, Life During Wartime, Import/Export, A Prairie Home Companion, Ken Park (which he co-directed), Erin Brockovich, The Virgin Suicides, The Limey, Selena, Mi Familia (My Family), Light Sleeper, London Kills Me, Less Than Zero, and Desperately Seeking Susan, to name a few. His next project is the upcoming Haynes film, Wonderstruck (2017). In addition to narrative features, Lachman has consistently contributed to the documentary genre, shooting Don't Blink - Robert Frank, Collapse, Soldiers of Music, Mother Teresa, Ornette: Made in America, In Our Hands, Lightning Over Water, and La Soufrière. He also directed the documentaries In the Hearts of Africa, Life for a Child, Cell Stories, and Report From Hollywood. Lachman is also known as a visual artist who has had installations, videos and photography at The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Ludwig Museum in Germany, and many other museums and galleries throughout the world. Garcia has collected Emmy nominations for Murder in the Heartland (1993) and The Day Lincoln was Shot (1998), both of which received ASC Award nominations. He earned additional nods from his peers in the ASC for Thomas Carter's Divas (1996) and the pilot of Twin Peaks (1991). In 1991, Garcia won a CableACE Award for HBO's movie El Diablo and another CableACE Award nomination for Peter Markle's Nightbreaker. His long list of memorable credits includes TV hits such as Rizzoli and Isles, the first season of the current CBS series Hawaii Five-O, Numb3rs, Providence, Gilmore Girls, EZ Streets, Michael Mann's Crime Story, and the pilots for L.A. Takedown and Stingray. He photographed numerous television movies, including Alien Nation: The Udara Legacy, Mutiny, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Baby, Deliberate Intent, Brave New World, and Diane Keaton's Girl With the Crazy Brother, among others. Rousselot earned an Academy Award for A River Runs Through It (1993), as well as an ASC nomination. Furthermore, he was Oscar-nominated for Hope and Glory (1987) and Henry & June (1990), with the former also receiving a BSC Award. His award-winning body of work includes Dangerous Liaisons (1988) and The Bear (1988), which garnered ASC nominations, and Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles (1994), which won a BAFTA and BSC Award. Additional credits include The Miracle, Remember the Titans, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Planet of the Apes, Antwone Fisher, Sherlock Holmes, Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows, The Nice Guys, and the upcoming Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. A native of France, Rousselot won his first Cesar Award (France's equivalent of an Oscar) for Diva (1981), and earned additional trophies for Thérèse (1986) and Queen Margot (1994). He's compiled around 70 credits, working with renowned directors such as Tim Burton, Stephen Frears, Neil Jordan, Robert Redford, Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington, among many others. Schreiber is a Detroit native who, after receiving her psychology degree at the University of Michigan, moved to New York and worked her way up from production assistant to gaffer. Early in her career, she was gaffer on the Academy Award-nominated documentary The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir for co-directors Shirley MacLaine and Claudia Weill. As a cinematographer, Schreiber has an eclectic list of narrative film and television credits as well as commercials, music videos and documentaries. Her work includes Your Friends and Neighbors, The Nines, Visions of Light, In Plain Sight (pilot), HBO's The Comeback, episodes of ABC'S The Family, and the new FX series Better Things. Schreiber's cinematography in Chain of Desire earned her an Independent Spirit Award nomination (1994), which she followed with an Emmy nomination (1996) for her work on the documentary The Celluloid Closet. She landed on Variety's 10 Cinematographers to Watch before taking home the coveted Best Cinematography Award at Sundance for November in 2004. She previously shared a Sundance Cinematography Award on My America... Or Honk if You Love Buddha (1997). In addition to serving on the ASC Board of Governors, she was on the board of Women In Film (WIF) and is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Schreiber has taught advanced cinematography at the American Film Institute and, between shooting, continues to guest lecture at film schools in California, New York, and around the world. For information regarding the 31st ASC Awards, visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333. (Oscar and Academy Award are registered trademarks of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. Emmy is a registered trademark of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.)
  10. LOS ANGELES (September 15, 2016) - The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has set February 4, 2017, as the date for their 31st Annual Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography. Daryn Okada, ASC will serve as awards chair, with Lowell Peterson, ASC, as co-chairman. The ceremony will take place at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. The ASC will honor excellence in feature film and television cinematography, along with recognizing several cinematographers and filmmakers for their contributions to the art and craft of filmmaking throughout their career. The organization has also officially opened the submission process for the television competition. The ASC is now accepting entries in three categories: (1) Episode of a Television Series - Commercial; (2) Episode of a Television Series - Non Commercial; and (3) TV Movie/Miniseries/Pilot. The deadline for submissions is November 1 by 5 p.m. (PT). To qualify for the ASC TV awards, shows must have a premiere broadcast date in the United States between November 1, 2015, and October 31, 2016. Entry forms can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/ascawardstventryform on the ASC website. The timeline for the 31st ASC Awards is as follows: September 14 - Student Award Nominees Announced October - Honorees Announcement for Lifetime Achievement Award, Career Achievement in Television Award, International Award, and Presidents Award October 15 - Student Award Winners Announced November 1, 5 p.m. PT - Deadline for Television Entries November 22 - Television Nominations Announced December - Board of Governors Award Recipient Announced December 1 - Spotlight Award submissions due December 12 (week of) - Nominations Ballots sent (Theatrical Release Only) December 31 - Awards year ends (Theatrical Release Only) January 6 - Deadline for Theatrical Nomination Ballots January 9 (week of) - Spotlight Nominations Announced January 10 - Theatrical Nominations AnnouncedJanuary 23 - Spotlight Award Final Ballots Due January 28 - ASC Open House January 30 - Final Polls Close (Theatrical Release Only) February 4 - 31st Annual ASC Awards Show Last year's ASC Awards winners included: Emmanuel Lubezki, ASC, AMC (THE REVENANT); Vanja Cernjul, ASC, HFS (CASANOVA); Pierre Gill, CSC (MARCO POLO); Adam Arkapaw, ACS (MACBETH); and Mátyás Erdély, HSC (SON OF SAUL). John Toll, ASC, Lowell Peterson, ASC, Bill Bennett, ASC and Ridley Scott were also honored at the awards gala for their body of work. Chartered in January of 1919, the ASC is defined by their reputation of excellence in advancing the art of visual storytelling. Currently, the ASC has more than 360 active members and 200-plus associate members, all from various sectors of the industry that support the skilled art and craft of filmmaking. Membership and associate membership is achieved through invitation only. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com, or join American Cinematographer on Facebook and Twitter (@AmericanCine).
  11. LOS ANGELES (January 14, 2015) - Award-winning actress-director-producer-writer-singer Barbra Streisand will receive the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) 2015 Board of Governors Award. The Oscar®-winning filmmaker and entertainer will be honored during the 29th Annual ASC Outstanding Achievement Awards gala here on February 15 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza. "Barbra Streisand's accomplishments across the entertainment industry are unparalleled, and we look forward to celebrating her groundbreaking contributions to the art of filmmaking," said ASC President Richard Crudo. "The three films that Ms. Streisand directed have earned 14 Academy Award® nominations, and her skill in working with cinematographers in achieving her vision is a hallmark of her directorial work." She is the only artist to achieve Oscar, Tony®, Emmy®, Grammy®, Directors Guild of America, Golden Globe®, and Peabody Awards, as well as a National Medal of Honor, France's Légion d'honneur, the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award, and the Kennedy Center Honors. Streisand won a Best Actress Oscar for FUNNY GIRL (1968), which was her first role in a motion picture. She also was honored with an Academy Award as the composer of the song "Evergreen" for her production, A STAR IS BORN (1976). She has starred in such memorable films as THE PRINCE OF TIDES (1991); HELLO, DOLLY! (1969); ON A CLEAR DAY YOU CAN SEE FOREVER (1970); A STAR IS BORN; and THE MIRROR HAS TWO FACES (1996). In 1983, Streisand became the first American woman to direct, write, produce and star in a feature-length motion picture, YENTL. Her directorial debut won her Golden Globes for Best Director and Best Motion Picture, and the film earned five Oscar nominations. Streisand also directed, produced and starred in THE PRINCE OF TIDES and THE MIRROR HAS TWO FACES, which together earned nine Oscar nominations. Streisand returned to the big screen in 2004, after a hiatus, to star in MEET THE FOCKERS, which became the highest grossing live-action comedy film at that time. In addition to the two Oscars she has on her shelf, Streisand earned three additional nominations. Her multiple awards include five Emmy Awards, three Peabody Awards, and 10 Grammy Awards including Grammy's Lifetime Achievement and Legend Awards. She also has earned a record 12 Golden Globes. In the field of recording, she has sold more albums than any other female artist among a long list of achievements, including her recent feat of becoming the only artist to achieve No.1 albums in six consecutive decades. The ASC Board of Governors Award is given to an individual who has made extraordinary achievements in advancing the art and craft of filmmaking. Previous recipients include Harrison Ford, Julia Roberts, Christopher Nolan, Warren Beatty, Francis Ford Coppola, Sally Field, Morgan Freeman, Ron Howard, Sydney Pollack, Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, among others. For more information regarding the ASC Awards, visit the ASC website at www.theasc.com, or call 323-969-4333.
  12. HBO's Game of Thrones Leads the Pack LOS ANGELES, November 19, 2014 - Highlighting excellence in television cinematography, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has named its nominees for the organization's 29th Annual Outstanding Achievement Awards. The winners will be announced on February 15, 2015, at a gala held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza. The nominees are: For an Episode of a Regular Series: P.J. Dillon for Vikings, "Blood Eagle" (History) Jonathan Freeman, ASC for Boardwalk Empire, "Golden Days for Boys and Girls" (HBO) Anette Haellmigk for Game of Thrones, "The Children" (HBO) Christopher Norr for Gotham, "Spirit of the Goat" (FOX) Richard Rutkowski for Manhattan, "Perestroika" (WGN America) Fabian Wagner for Game of Thrones, "Mockingbird" (HBO) For a Television Movie, Miniseries, or Pilot: David Greene, CSC for the TV movie The Trip to Bountiful (Lifetime) John Lindley, ASC for the Manhattan pilot (WGN America) David Stockton, ASC for the Gotham pilot (FOX) Theo Van de Sande, ASC for the TV movie Deliverance Creek (Lifetime) "Our members had a very difficult time choosing these nominees from such an incredible field of submissions," says ASC President Richard Crudo. "They have done superlative work in a very challenging medium, and we salute them." This is Freeman's eighth nomination. He has won four ASC Awards for Game of Thrones (2014), Boardwalk Empire (2012, 2011), and Homeland Security (2005), with additional noms for Taken (2003), Strange Justice (2000) and Prince Street (1998). Stockton previously won for his work on Eleventh Hour (2009) and earned nominations for the Alcatraz pilot (2013), Chase (2012), and the Nikita pilot (2011). Also receiving prior recognition are Greene for Beauty and the Beast (2014), Haellmigk for Game of Thrones (2014) and Lindley for Pan Am (2012). Dillon, Norr, Rutkowski, Van de Sande and Wagner are first-time nominees. HBO leads the pack with three nominations, followed by Fox, Lifetime and WGN America with two each. The History Channel rounds out the networks represented. For information regarding the 29th ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333.
  13. John Bailey, Bill Roe, Phil Méheux and Matthew Leonetti to be Feted at Annual ASC Awards LOS ANGELES (September 23, 2014) - John Bailey, ASC; Bill Roe, ASC; Phil Méheux, BSC; and Matthew F. Leonetti, ASC will be recognized by their fellow cinematographers during the 29th Annual American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) Awards for Outstanding Achievement on February 15, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Century City. Bailey will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award, Roe the Career Achievement in Television Award, Méheux earns the International Award, and Leonetti will be recognized with the Presidents Award. "These four individuals have set the standard for excellence that push us all forward in this industry," says ASC President Richard Crudo. "Their artistry and skill reflects in their body of work as well as in their lives and relationships with colleagues. We are proud to honor them." Bailey's work encompasses a long list of memorable and award-winning films. After apprenticing as a crewmember with such notable cinematographers as Néstor Almendros, ASC; Vilmos Zsigmond, ASC, HSC; and Don Peterman, ASC, he went on to earn his first narrative credit in 1978. His work on Ordinary People (1980) and The Big Chill (1983) earned critical acclaim, and he went on to receive a Spirit Award nomination for his cinematography of Tough Guys Don't Dance (1987). He has subsequently compiled more than 70 credits with directors such as Robert Redford, John Schlesinger, Michael Apted, Lawrence Kasdan, Wolfgang Petersen, Ken Kwapis, Stuart Rosenberg, and many others. His accomplishments include American Gigolo, The Pope of Greenwich Village, Silverado, Mishima, The Accidental Tourist, Groundhog Day, In The Line of Fire, As Good As It Gets, Incident at Loch Ness, Big Miracle, The Way Way Back, and the upcoming The Forger and A Walk in the Woods. Bailey is also an ardent mentor to the next generation of filmmakers. He frequently participates in lighting workshops, seminars and screenings. At UCLA, he has served as a Regents Lecturer, a special teaching assignment given by the UC Board of Regents, as well as the Kodak Cinematographer in Residence for the School of Theater, Film & Television. He has also judged the annual Kodak Scholarship Program for several years. He's previously been honored by the Society of Camera Operators (SOC) with their President's Award, at International Cinematographers Guild (ICG) events with the Kodak Mentor Award and Technicolor Cinematography Journalist of the Year, and Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Big Bear Lake and Ojai Film Festivals, among other accolades. Currently, he is fulfilling vice president duties at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and writes a well-respected blog for the ASC, "John's Bailiwick," on all aspects of art. Roe, who is being honored for his achievements in television, has been nominated for three Primetime Emmy® Awards for his work on The X-Files and Faith of My Fathers. The ASC has nominated him nine times, for which he won two back-to-back awards for The X-Files (1999, 2000). Since 1997, Roe has shot nearly 200 television episodes contributing to Castle, Brooklyn South, Las Vegas, Day Break, Robbery Homicide Division, Mad Men, and such pilots as Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, The Mentalist, and Eastwick. Earning the international accolade, Méheux's work spans four decades, shooting prominent films such as The Long Good Friday, The Fourth Protocol, GoldenEye, The Mask of Zorro, Entrapment, Bicentennial Man, Around the World in 80 Days, The Legend of Zorro, and Edge of Darkness. Méheux won the British Society of Cinematographers' (BSC) Best Cinematography Award for his work on Casino Royale (2006), and was also nominated for a BAFTA. Méheux served as president of the BSC from 2002 to 2006, and has been a member of the organization since 1979. Leonetti's recognition is for his impressive cinematographic contributions and dedication to the ASC. Beginning as a camera operator, Leonetti quickly became a full-fledged cinematographer shooting iconic films, including Poltergeist, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Weird Science, Jagged Edge, Star Trek: First Contact, Dawn of the Dead, The Butterfly Effect, and Rush Hour 2. Forty years after his first role as director of photography on Bat People (1974), Leonetti continues to shoot, including the upcoming Dumb and Dumber To. For information regarding the 29th Annual ASC Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography, visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333.
  14. Trio will be Presented Awards at Annual ASC Gala (LOS ANGELES, CA) Dean Cundey, ASC; Eduardo Serra, AFC, ASC; and Richard Rawlings, Jr., ASC will be recognized by their peers during the 28th Annual American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) Outstanding Achievement Awards on February 1, 2014, here at the Hollywood & Highland Ray Dolby Ballroom. Cundey will receive the ASC's Lifetime Achievement Award; Serra will be presented with the International Achievement Award; and Rawlings will pick up the org's Career Achievement in Television Award. "Anyone who has been in the presence of these three brilliant and talented individuals should count themselves lucky," notes ASC President Richard Crudo. "Dean, Eduardo and Dick have each had an immeasurable impact on our art form, and we're proud to have the opportunity to honor their outstanding craftsmanship." Cundey first attracted widespread attention when he collaborated with John Carpenter on the production of Halloween (1978). The two filmmakers continued to work together on such memorable films as The Fog, Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween II and III, and Big Trouble in Little China. For his work on Robert Zemeckis' landmark, live-action film Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), Cundey garnered both Oscar® and BAFTA nominations. Zemeckis and Cundey also teamed up on the beloved Back to the Future trilogy, Romancing the Stone, and Death Becomes Her. Cundey earned his first nomination from his peers at the ASC for Steven Spielberg's Hook (1991), and a second one for his gripping imagery of Ron Howard's Apollo 13 (1995). He also earned the Society of Operating Cameraman's President's Award in 1999. Cundey's credits also include such notable films as Jurassic Park, What Women Want, Garfield, The Holiday, The Spy Next Door, Jack and Jill, Crazy Kind of Love, and the upcoming releases Walking with the Enemy and Carry Me Home. "Dean has continually raised the bar with his magnificent imagery, and I'm certain he will continue to do so for many years to come," says ASC Awards Chairman Lowell Peterson. "He has compiled an incomparable body of work that has made a meaningful and indelible impression on the art of filmmaking. This award is a symbol of our respect and admiration for both the man and his work." Serra earned his first Academy Award® nomination for Iain Softley's The Wings of the Dove (1997), which also netted him a BAFTA Award. In 2004, he received Oscar® and BAFTA nominations for Peter Webber's Girl with the Pearl Earring. His work on such films as Jude, Map of the Human Heart, What Dreams May Come and Funny Bones is highly acclaimed. Serra has over 50 feature films to his credit, including A Promise, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 and Part 2, Blood Diamond, Beyond the Sea, Unbreakable, and The Widow of Saint-Pierre, among others. In 2004, for his services to enhance Portuguese culture, he was presented with the prestigious Order of Prince Henry the Navigator, one of the highest honors given by his native Portugal. Rawlings grew up in Hollywood, under the tutelage of his father, Richard Rawlings, Sr., ASC. He worked alongside his father for years, learning the industry from the ground up. His first TV series as director of photography was in 1978 on the cultural phenomenon Charlie's Angels. He went on to shoot such memorable series as Matt Houston, Stingray, L.A. Law, Boston Public, Gilmore Girls and Desperate Housewives, among others. Rawlings telefilm credits include Halley's Comet, Spring Awakening and Gidget's Summer Reunion. He has earned Emmy® nominations for the series Ohara (1987), Paradise (1988), Reasonable Doubts (1991), and the television movie Big Dreams & Broken Hearts: The Dottie West Story (1995). Rawlings also earned an ASC Outstanding Achievement Award for Paradise in 1989, and another nomination for the series in 1990. In 1993, he received his third ASC Award nomination for the telefilm When No One Would Listen. For information regarding the 28th ASC Outstanding Achievement Awards, visit www.theasc.com or call 323-969-4333. # # # (Photos of the ASC honorees are available upon request.) About The American Society of Cinematographers The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the art of filmmaking. Since its charter in 1919, the ASC has been committed to educating aspiring filmmakers and others about the art and craft of cinematography. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com. Join ASC on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/The.ASC and American Cinematographer magazine fan page at http://www.facebook.com/AmericanCinematographer. (Oscar and Academy Award are registered trademarks of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences.) (Emmy is a registered trademark of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.) Media Contacts: ignite strategic communications 818.980.3473 Sally Christgau, sally@ignite.bz Lisa Muldowney, lisa@ignite.bz
  15. Game of Thrones, Hunted, Wilfred and Great Expectations Win in TV Categories LOS ANGELES - Roger Deakins, ASC, BSC; Balazs Bolygo, HSC; Kramer Morgenthau, ASC; Florian Hoffmeister; and Bradford Lipson claimed top honors in the four competitive categories at the 27th Annual American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) Awards for Outstanding Achievement, which was held here tonight at the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland. Deakins won the ASC Award in the feature film competition for SKYFALL. Bolygo and Morgenthau tied in the one-hour television episodic category for Cinemax's HUNTED and HBO's GAME OF THRONES, respectively. Hoffmeister won the TV movie/miniseries award for PBS' GREAT EXPECTATIONS, and Lipson was the recipient of the half-hour television episodic category for FX's WILFRED. The ASC Award for best feature was presented by Emmy®-nominated actor John Slattery. Deakins, who was regrettably not able to attend, has previously won ASC Awards for THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION (1995) and THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE (2002). His other ASC nominations include FARGO (1997), KUNDUN (1998), O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU? (2001), NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (2008), THE ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES BY THE COWARD ROBERT FORD (2008), REVOLUTIONARY ROAD (2009), THE READER (2009), and TRUE GRIT (2011). He also received the organization's Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011. The other nominees in the feature film category were Seamus McGarvey, ASC, BSC (ANNA KARENINA), Danny Cohen, BSC (LES MISERABLES), Claudio Miranda, ASC (LIFE OF PI), and Janusz Kaminski (LINCOLN). Actor David Zayas, also known as Sgt. Batista on DEXTER, announced Bolygo and Morgenthau had tied for the Outstanding Achievement Award in the one-hour television category. This is the first tie in ASC Awards history. Bolygo, a first-time ASC nominee, won for the "Mort" episode of HUNTED. This is the first win for Morgenthau, who has been previously nominated for THE FIVE PEOPLE YOU MEET IN HEAVEN (2005), LIFE ON MARS (2009) and BOARDWALK EMPIRE (2011). Tonight's award is for the GAME OF THRONES episode "The North Remembers." The other nominees in the one-hour television episodic series category were Christopher Manley, ASC for AMC's MAD MEN ("The Phantom"), David Moxness, CSC for FOX's FRINGE ("Letters of Transit"), Mike Spragg for Cinemax's STRIKE BACK (Episode 11) and David Stockton, ASC for FOX's ALCATRAZ (Pilot). Oscar®-nominee Mary McDonnell presented the Television Movie/Miniseries Award to first-time ASC nominee Hoffmeister for the PBS Masterpiece presentation of GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Nominated along with Hoffmeister were Michael Goi, ASC for FX's AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM ("I am Anne Frank: Part 2"), Arthur Reinhart for History Channel's HATFIELDS & MCCOYS, and Rogier Stoffers, ASC for HBO's HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN. TWO BROKE GIRLS' Matthew Moy presented the half-hour television category award to Lipson, who was a first-time ASC nominee for the "Truth" episode of WILFRED. Nominated alongside Lipson were Ken Glassing for FOX's BEN AND KATE ("Guitar Face"), Goi for NBC's THE NEW NORMAL ("Pilot"), Peter Levy, ASC for Showtime's HOUSE OF LIES ("Gods of Dangerous Financial Instruments"), and Michael Price for ABC's HAPPY ENDINGS ("Four Weddings and a Funeral (Minus Three Weddings and One Funeral)"). Oscar®-winner Angelina Jolie presented the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award to Dean Semler, ASC, ACS who earned an Oscar® and an ASC Award for Kevin Costner's DANCES WITH WOLVES (1991). In 2007, his work on Mel Gibson's APOCALYPTO earned him a second ASC Award nomination. Semler's nearly 70 feature credits include such memorable films as CITY SLICKERS, LAST ACTION HERO, WATERWORLD, THE BONE COLLECTOR, WE WERE SOLDIERS, XXX, BRUCE ALMIGHTY, THE ALAMO, GET SMART, 2012, DATE NIGHT, SECRETARIAT, Jolie's directorial debut IN THE LAND OF BLOOD AND HONEY, PARENTAL GUIDANCE, and the upcoming MALEFICENT. The ASC International Award was presented to Robby Müller, NSC, BVK by director Steve McQueen and actress Nastassja Kinski who worked with him on the film PARIS, TEXAS. Kinski noted, "Seeing Robby work on that film made me want to know all about the camera - how it catches light, images, and feelings. How it serves as the window to each film." Müller was unable to attend the event, and McQueen and Kinski accepted the award on his behalf. The Career Achievement in Television Award was presented to Rodney Charters, ASC, CSC (24) by Sir Robert Harvey, mayor of Waitakere City in New Zealand. The ASC Presidents Award was given to Curtis Clark, ASC (THE DRAUGHTSMAN'S CONTRACT) by Stephen Burum, ASC. Last year, Emmanuel Lubezki, ASC, AMC won the ASC feature award for THE TREE OF LIFE. The American Society of Cinematographers was chartered in January 1919. There are more than 300 active members of ASC, and 150-plus associate members from sectors of the industry that support the art and craft of filmmaking. Membership and associate membership is by invitation based on contributions that individuals have made to advance the art of visual storytelling. For additional information about the ASC, visit www.theasc.com. Join ASC on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/The.ASC and American Cinematographer magazine fan page at # # # Media Contacts: ignite strategic communications Lisa Muldowney - 760.212.4130 / lisa@ignite.bz Sally Christgau - 415.238.2254/ sally@ignite.bz
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