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Found 2 results

  1. Hello. I have been making short movies all my life. Went to Pittsburgh filmmakers and shot a couple 3 min long films in 16mm. In 2007 I bought a canon hv20. It's a hdv camcorder that takes the old, small tapes. Anyway, here's my thoughts. The 16mm film I did (the one that turned out well and not grossly overexposed) looked phenomenal to my eyes. I''d/I've never done anything else that looked that good. It was done on Kodak 16mm color neg 200t. I used a bolex from school with ordinary, non zoom lenses. So, ff to 2007. When I took a few videos with hv20, I was floored by the quality. I compared it to the 16mm film I did. The 16mm still looked better, and handled colors better. However, with the hv20, after tinkering with it a while , I've gotten COMPLETELY mixed results. I've learned that if you're shooting on video, everything has to be PERFECT to get the same quality every time. It's almost as if the stars have to be right to remain consistent. I mean, I have lit it well and it looks like crap, and I've lit it poorly and it looks great. Vice-versa. I just got back some 16mm b and w reversal I shot with a bolex. Looks good. however, after comparing it to a few of my "good days" footage with the hv20 (b&w in post), the hv20 clearly stands out. So now I'm shaking my head, confused more than ever. The HDV tapes are exceedingly cheaper than film and do produce excellent image quality... if everything is done absolutely perfect every time. How do I do this? I just don't know what I'm doing wrong to get some things looks great and some things that look like a 1980s videocam.
  2. Sachtler, part of Vitec Videocom, a Vitec group company, has released the next upgrade to its renowned FSB product line with its brand new ENG 75/2 D HD tripod. This high-quality tripod for ENG professionals is the latest design from Sachtler, who has been the partner of choice for camera operators for more than 50 years. Supporting a very wide payload range up to 35kg/77.2lbs, the ENG 75/2 D HD guarantees precise camera operation. The 75 mm bowl tripod offers operators the most robust and durable option providing the ease of use and quick set up vital for all ENG applications. The new aluminum tripod weighs just 3.1 kg/6.8 lbs, optional as ground and mid spreader versions, and incorporates premium Sachtler features such as easy and accessible controls and the high torsional stiffness required to deliver the ultimate professional performance for broadcasters. The tripod is the ideal companion for Sachtler's renowned range of FSB fluid heads, notably the FSB 6 and FSB 8, designed for all users of DSLR and HDV camcorders. Features of the FSB product family include Sideload or the Touch & Go mechanism that allows for super-fast connection of the camera to the head. When used in conjunction with the FSB 8 head, it is ideal choice for shooting in fast moving news set-ups - with a wide payload range of 1 to 10 kg (2.2 - 22lbs), and tried and tested Sachtler features such as the unique Speedbalance mechanism that enables even faster and finer counterbalance of the camera system. In addition, the robust tripod has been built to operate in an extreme temperature range of -40/+60 degrees centigrade (-40/+140 Fahrenheit). Tobias Keuthen, Sachtler's Global Brand Manager, says, "Even faced with extreme conditions in ENG applications, our tripods are extremely resilient and break-proof. Each tripod has been designed for ease of use, so camera operators can go from using the tripod to shooting from the shoulder in a matter of seconds. "This new ENG 75/2 D HD tripod allows trouble-free shooting in every environment with improved features that will provide all the control and flexibility required to deliver a best-in-class Sachtler performance." Sachtler will showcase the new tripod at their booth (#C6025) at NAB 2014.
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