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Found 6 results

  1. BURBANK, CA (May 1, 2019) – There’s nothing small about the bicoastal post-production workflow provided by FotoKem for Universal Pictures’ and Legendary Pictures’ Little. FotoKem’s Atlanta and Burbank facilities supported the production from digital dailies through finishing with a full ACES finish for this fantasy comedy. From blockbuster producer Will Packer (Girls Trip, Night School, the Ride Along franchise) and director and co-writer Tina Gordon (Peeples, Drumline), Little tells the story of a tech mogul (Girls Trip’s Regina Hall) who is transformed into a 13-year-old version of herself (Marsai Martin), and must rely on her long-suffering assistant (Insecure’s Issa Rae), just as the future of her company is on the line. Martin, who stars in the TV series Black-ish, had the idea for the film when she was 10 and acts as an executive producer on the film. She is the youngest person to hold that title on a major Hollywood production. Principal photography for Little took place last summer in the Atlanta area. FotoKem’s Atlanta location provided digital dailies with looks developed by FotoKem colorist Alastor Arnold alongside cinematographer Greg Gardiner (Girls Trip, Night School) who shot with Sony F55 cameras. “Greg likes a super-clean look, which we based on Sony color science, with a warm and cool variant and a standard hero LUT,” says Arnold. “He creates the style of every scene with his lighting and photography. We wanted to maximize his out-of-the-camera look and pass it through to the grading process.” FotoKem responded to the sharp growth of production in Georgia, and entered the Atlanta market five years ago to offer on-the-ground support for creatives. “FotoKem Atlanta is an extension of our Burbank team with colorists and operations staff to provide the upfront workflow required for file-based dailies,” says Senior Vice President Tom Vice of FotoKem’s Creative Services Division. “Atlanta is an exciting place to be, and we’re thrilled to be part of that community.” When editor David Moritz and the editorial team moved to Los Angeles, FotoKem sent EDLs to its nextLAB dailies platform, the facility’s proprietary digital file management system, where shots for VFX vendors were transcoded as ACES EXR files with full color metadata. Non-VFX shots were also automatically pulled from nextLAB for conform. The online was completed in Resolve. The DI and the film conform happened concurrently, with Arnold and Gardiner working together daily. “We had a full ACES pipeline, with high dynamic range and high bit rate, which both Greg and I liked,” Arnold says. “The film has a punchy, crisp chromatic look, but it’s not too contemporary in style or hyper-pushed. It’s clean and naturalistic with an extra chroma punch.” Gordon was also a key part of the collaboration, playing an active role in the DI, working closely with Gardiner to craft the images. “She really got into the color aspect of the workflow,” notes Arnold. “Of course, she had a vision for the movie and fully embraced the way that color impacts the story during the DI process.” Arnold’s first pass was for the theatrical grade and the second for the HDR10 grade. “What I like about ACES is the simplicity of transforming to different color spaces and working environments. And the HDR grade was a quicker process,” he says. “HDR is increasingly part of our deliverables, and we’re seeing a lot more ACES workflows lately, including work on trailers.” FotoKem’s deliverables included a DCP, DCDM and DSM for the theatrical release; separations and .j2k files for HDR10 archiving; and ProRes QuickTimes for QC.
  2. Hey everyone, I recently have been attempting to understand ACES. Currently, I am using C-LOG footage from a C100 mk II, but I've noticed that the IDT for C100 C-Log isn't listed in the Resolve project settings. I've found a CTL file for this (presumably) on Canon's website, but I have no idea how to install that in the program, and the more I try to delve into ACES the more complicated everything seems to be. Does anyone have advice for this? Thanks!
  3. WHAT: 2015 Cine Gear Expo ACES Panel WHEN: Saturday, June 6th, 10:15 to 11:30AM WHERE: Sherry Lansing Theater, Paramount Studios DESCRIPTION: After years of research and development, ACES 1.0 has arrived. ACES enables DPs and directors to preserve the on-set creative intent and carry it into dailies, editorial, VFX, the DI and on into archiving. It does this, in large part, by addressing many of the long-standing color management issues facing today’s productions. Hear from hands-on filmmakers and technologists how ACES came into being, why it is important and how it impacts the creative and practical production process. Gain insight into how ACES can help simplify workflows, solve color reproduction issues on a wide range of displays, facilitate the integration of footage from multiple camera models and lenses, and provide a single color management standard. PANELISTS: Curtis Clark, ASC - director of photography; chairman, ASC Technology Committee; recipient, AMPAS Scientific and Technical Achievement Award (ASC-CDL); recipient, ASC Presidents Award Theo van de Sande, ASC - director of photography Award; nominee, 2014 ASC Award (“Deliverance Creek”) Bobby Maruvada - digital imaging technician and colorist John Daro - digital intermediate colorist, FotoKem (“Deliverence Creek”) Ray Feeney - ACES Project Committee co-chair, AMPAS MODERATOR: Mark Weingartner – VFX director of photography; chair, ICG National Training Committee; member, ASC Technology Committee Presented by ICG and ASC Technology Committee, in cooperation with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences
  4. Hi Guys, I’ve been running into some very strange discrepancies between grading in the ACES and YRGB colour spaces in Resolve, and was wondering if anyone might be able to shed some light on them? In a nutshell, what I’m seeing is the following: - in YRGB, images respond predictably to LUTs, but yield less subtle variation in skintones - in ACES, images become violently overexposed when applying LUTs, and contain boosted red tones - After correction, images in ACES appear to yield more accurate and nuanced colour reproduction Here’s the original log image (slog3 from a Sony F5) and it’s waveform. The exposure values for her skin and the wall in the background are sitting where I’d expect them to be: Now in YRGB mode, when I apply the LC709A LUT to the log image, exposure values are lifted to approximately where I’d expect them to go: LC709A is designed to mimic Alexa’s Rec709 output, and does a nice job of normalising slog3 images, it doesn’t crush the blacks though, so a slight contrast curve is needed to put the darker tones where they belong: There’s a slight overall green tint to the colour here, but it’s easily corrected out, and we have a normalised image. When apply a straight Filmconvert grade on top of the image, everything ends up right where we’d expect it to go without any further corrections or fine-tuning: When we flip Resolve over into ACES v1.0 mode though, and apply the same LUTs/Looks, we get very different results. (note I’m not using any IDT or ODT on the footage, merely grading it in the ACES colour space). Applying the LC709A LUT in ACES results in this: Exposure values blown sky high. Applying the straight Filmconvert look on top does the same thing, only worse: Now with some contrast curves, we can correct the ACES image back to normalised levels: However, there is an excessive amount of red in this normalised ACES image. Now for this scene, I had uncorrected 650w tungsten lights coming through daytime windows to simulate late afternoon light, and that would have increased the red in the image, but given the light wasn’t hitting the actress directly, it seems odd that the red levels are so boosted. With the excess red dialled out however, the ACES image yield more nuanced and appealing skintones. Here’s the corrected Filmconvert look, with the excess red removed and the exposure levels brought down to normalised levels: Compare that to the YRGB Filmconvert image, and you can see how much more nuanced and realistic the skintones look: And again, ACES with a straight Filmconvert look applied, brightness corrected and excess red removed: And the YRGB version: http://i.imgur.com/adukanA.jpg Again the skin looks much less wooden, and more realistic in the ACES version. The richer reds of her lips are more clearly defined from the skin on her face. Is anyone else experiencing similar strange responses to LUTs in ACES in Resolve? And does anyone know what might be causing the discrepancy? Any insights would be greatly appreciated. Cheers, Mark
  5. Hey everyone, I work for Central, a DI facility in Vancouver, and together with FilmLight and Dolby we're hosting an event in November about our work on Neill Blomkamp's Elysium. We'll be discussing our approach to VFX integration, using the ACES colour workflow, as well as some creative insight from our colourist, Andrea Chlebak, on creating the look. Elysium: Crafting the Future in DI November 14th, 6:30 to 9:30 @ Vancity Theatre RSVP and additional information on our Eventbrite page: http://elysiumcraftingthefuturevancouver.eventbrite.com/ Thanks! -Alex
  6. Hi there, I am new to the cinema DNG workflow and I just started working with the Ikonoskop a-cam-dii. Although I have been doing a lot of research on the subject, I would like to have some advice from someone with some experience in the field. My questions is the following: for projects that do not need massive color correction, would it be acceptable to throw away the DNG files after transcoding them to Prores 4444 or Prores HQ 422 and use these Prores files as the master files? What would the disadvantages be in this case, if any? Thanks
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