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Found 6 results

  1. I hope an app I developed may be useful to cinematographers. Sundial shows essential solar and lunar data + allows you to create alerts for 20 sun/moon events including sunrise, solar noon, sunset, dusk, moonrise, and the full moon. It is for iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. http://www.sundialapp.com/ I'm a film lover and have thought the alert feature might be useful on a film set, as tool to help to remind you of changing light conditions other than "looking around." The alerts are calculated and generated on the device without a server, and work without an Internet connection (such as on a remote set). Sundial is free, with a one-time in-app purchase (currently USD$2.99) to unlock some features/restrictions, including the ability to jump to any location/date (assist in shoot planning) and enable more than one alert. I welcome any feedback! Thank you. -Mike
  2. Lots of discussion on the why of shooting with an iPhone, but I'm wondering about how. As in how do you create lighting that will let you get a good meaty picture and lots of subject separation using an iPhone. Expressiveness is a topic for another day. Specifically where would you start with light levels, ratios, color temps, and the rest? I presume you would set light levels so the camera could be shot at its native ISO value, but beyond that: Would you go very hard source light? Ultra diffused? Religiously keep your ratios at 2:1 or eliminate the fill and let the shadows fall where they may? How about colors? With the limitations of the iPhone sensor would it be best to define shapes with contrasting colors (solid-colored costumes against relatively plain cool backgrounds) or would it be better to keep everything homogeneous (beige on beige on beige).
  3. Well, this is not how to shoot video, but still photographs, and it's been out there for about two weeks now. I wanted to ask you what do you think about it. Certainly none of you need this, but specifically I wanted to know what's up with this "lower the exposure" when shooting during golden hour? In my view, the photo would've looked much better if they let the exposure alone, even if the part of the face are overexposed. (BTW, does that golden hour look a little bit like not yet golden hour? I think that at one point it's as if you can just about see that someone has just warmed up the light a bit in postproduction or the camera changed white balance in that instant.) https://www.apple.com/iphone/photography-how-to/ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHFlHpPjgk72JW5vfYlzycSgG_Z6EV4hK
  4. Hey Guys, This may be a very dumb question, but how does apple film their app and iPhone commercials without the hands shaking while holding the device? Here is an example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szrsfeyLzyg At first I thought they utilized two separate layers, one for the hand holding the device and one for the finger swiping, and comped the two together. The layer with the hand holding the device almost appeared to be a still image, but what confused me was that I saw shadow movement on it when the finger swipes... Do they have a rig attached to the phone to keep it steady or stabilize the footage in post? Do they green screen and then comp? -Sam
  5. CREATING SHOT LISTS - THERE'S AN APP FOR THAT Create flexible shotlists for your next film with StoryFlow – available now on iOS for the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. Designed for directors and cinematographers working on independent and short films, the StoryFlow app lets you create lists of scenes and shots for an unlimited number of movies. Now you need never miss that important shot. Features include: * Easily reorder shots. * Create ‘shoot days’ and add shots to each, so you know which shots you need to get on which day. * When you’ve added all the shots for a scene, you can lock them. At that point, each shot has a fixed shot number. (Unlock at any time.) You can still reorder the shots according to the order in which you're going to shoot them, but the numbers won't change. * Number shots alphabetically (1A, 1B, 1C, etc) or numerically (1.1, 1.2, 1.3) – useful if you’re using some types of recorder, such as the Atomos Ninja. * View shots by the order in which they appear in the script, or in the order you want to shoot them on the day. * Create a new project by importing a Final Draft (.fdx) script via Dropbox. StoryFlow automatically creates the lists of scenes and shots straight from the script. * Export a Production (project) via email – for other people to import, or to use on another device. Exports include all data and images. Importing a Production file is done via Dropbox. * Add a photo to each shot for simple storyboarding. You can shoot a picture on your device or choose one from your photo library. * Mark each shot as ‘done’ while you’re shooting, for a quick check of your progress through the day. * Set highlight colours for productions and scenes – for example, to indicate the status of each. * Export your shotlists (in either script or shoot order) to a spreadsheet file and send via email – to your crew or yourself. * User-definable shot types (CU, MS etc) and lenses. Build and use these lists across all productions. You can also export them (via email) for use on other devices running StoryFlow. StoryFlow was created by film-makers for film-makers. All features are included in the one-off price of $7.99 - no in-app purchase or subscription required. Go to: http://www.zolascope.com/storyflow (where you'll find full online instructions) or find the app in Apple's iOS App Store at: http://bit.ly/storyflow.
  6. Looking for an iPhone/iPad mobile app that can give me relatively accurate spot color temperature metering. Any good ones out there? Which ones do you use?
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