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Pro-mist filter?


Jonathan Bel
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I was watching some episodes from the first season of law and order shot back in the 90's and I noticed in most, if not all the scenes, the luminous sources had coronas or halo-like glows while everything else in the scenes including the actors were sharp and unaffected. Would this be created with the use of a low density pro-mist filter, something like 1/4?

 

I'd like to replicate the look if I knew how.

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I was watching some episodes from the first season of law and order shot back in the 90's and I noticed in most, if not all the scenes, the luminous sources had coronas or halo-like glows while everything else in the scenes including the actors were sharp and unaffected. Would this be created with the use of a low density pro-mist filter, something like 1/4?

 

I'd like to replicate the look if I knew how.

 

Yes, something like that -- Fog, ProMist, etc. Ernest Dickerson shot some of the first season I believe and I remember he used the Harrison Diffusion filter for some of "Malcolm X", and that's also a very misty filter. Generally you'd use a light filter and a hot source in the frame to get more halation but less softening. If you can use a heavier filter, then the light doesn't need to be as hot to get halation but now you have more softening.

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I might do a screen test with some of the vivid8547 i have left and see what it gives me at different densities. when you said "hot source with filter", are we talking lights with higher temperature then rated for stock? if so, generally how much hotter. I noticed some of the fluorescents in the frames were as blown out white as the other scenes where it's obvious they were beaming HMI's through the windows. daylight tubes?

 

 

Yes, something like that -- Fog, ProMist, etc. Ernest Dickerson shot some of the first season I believe and I remember he used the Harrison Diffusion filter for some of "Malcolm X", and that's also a very misty filter. Generally you'd use a light filter and a hot source in the frame to get more halation but less softening. If you can use a heavier filter, then the light doesn't need to be as hot to get halation but now you have more softening.

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I might do a screen test with some of the vivid8547 i have left and see what it gives me at different densities. when you said "hot source with filter", are we talking lights with higher temperature then rated for stock? if so, generally how much hotter. I noticed some of the fluorescents in the frames were as blown out white as the other scenes where it's obvious they were beaming HMI's through the windows. daylight tubes?

 

No, "hot" as in bright.

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