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Best way of obtaining green/yellow/blue florescent tint?


Viggo Söderberg
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Hello!

I'm working on a student film and I want the film to look very dirty and underground. I like the green/blue tint of florescents as well as that yellow tint from sodium lamps? My school only has LED lights. Is my best bet to gel these lamps? What gels would I need to obtain the right tint in that case? Or should I try finding pratical florescents? 

We'll be shooting on an Alexa Mini.

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Sure, you can gel LED's cyan or yellow.

Cool White fluorescents are around 4700K with a green tint, so they only look cyan (blue-green) when the camera is set to 3200K, at 5600K setting, they look slightly yellow-green.  Sometimes I'll use a daylight LED and add 1/2 Green to them for a Cool White look when the camera is near 3200K.

In the case of a sodium vapor look, I'd start with a tungsten LED plus gel.

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13 hours ago, David Mullen ASC said:

Sure, you can gel LED's cyan or yellow.

Cool White fluorescents are around 4700K with a green tint, so they only look cyan (blue-green) when the camera is set to 3200K, at 5600K setting, they look slightly yellow-green.  Sometimes I'll use a daylight LED and add 1/2 Green to them for a Cool White look when the camera is near 3200K.

In the case of a sodium vapor look, I'd start with a tungsten LED plus gel.

Another Fluorescent question - 16mm - Cinematography.com

And that would create this kind of quality to the light? If I have som Kino Flos with 5500K tubes, could I combine gels to create that look as well?

And if I were to buy practicals what would I need to think about? Because I'd prefer to have some in the frame. I live in Sweden so light frequencies can vary between Europe and the US from what I know. We usually film things in 25fps here with 180 shutter angle (what I've heard is that with European frequencies we need to use 172,8 shutter when we use 24fps). There's so many light tubes to choose from and many of them are LEDs now adays. I don't know what features I should be looking after to get the green- and cyan-tinted tubes.

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Yes, you can gel a fluorescent tube, add green to a daylight tube for a cyan color cast when the camera is set close to 3200K.

Most household LED practicals are either daylight or cooler or close to tungsten, some even warmer. They are labeled as such. Most have a mild green cast (unfortunately) and some of the daylight ones are really too blue.  Just carry a still camera set manually to 3200K white balance to the store and take a picture of the lamp turned on if they have a display section. But also think about whether the design allows you to neatly gel the fixture or globe if necessary.

LEDs tend to have less flicker issues compared to a fluorescent.

There also also colored light bulbs, some tungsten, some compact fluorescent, some LED -- a common one is a deep yellow "bug light" color.
 

Screen Shot 2020-10-14 at 10.04.30 AM.png

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