Jump to content

"Paradise and Reunions" - Super 16mm Kodak Vision3 500T 7219 w/o Filters and Measured for ISO 100/200


Recommended Posts

Hello again, good folks!

It's been a - long while.  Covid has been pretty rough on a lot of us.  I know for me, personally, it wasn't easy going 15 months not being able to see friends and family for so long.  So, once I was fully vaccinated and able to start traveling again, I made a point of taking my super 16mm modified Krasnogorsk-3 with me and film 400 feet of Kodak's Vision3 500T stock of my outings.  

And lo and behold, I actually got a lot more shots in focus this time!  Was it because my skill as a one-mand-band camera operator and focus puller had improved?

Lol, nah.  It was just because I was able to stop the lens down so much, even when metering at ISO 100 and 200.  And also because the 500T stock is friggin' POWERFUL.  I mean, seriously, I was overexposed anywhere from 1 to 3 stops for a lot of these shots, and even shooting directly into the mid-afternoon sun on a gorgeous summer day here in Pennsylvania, the stock didn't lose the information.  Granted, it was overexposed, but when scanned on an HDR scanner like Colorlab's Lasergraphics Scanstation, all that highlight information is still actually there, and you can pull it to your heart's content, or just let it roll off beautifully into overexposure, as can be seen with my pretty heavy grade here.  

One thing I also learned is that my Krasnogorsk is not so good at slow-motion.  I've read what others have had to say here on this forum about the K3's registration, and - yeah, it's really not a steady camera.  Like, at all.  The only way it's viable is with some heavy assistance from DaVinci Resolve's Stabilizer, and even that's not a Magic Bullet 100% of the time.  So, the next time I decide I want to shoot slow-mo on my K3, just - stop me, please.  

I will say, though, I still love how so much of this footage turned out.  I'm definitely getting more confident in loading and unloading my K3, and film remains insanely easy to color grade.  All the shots here, in terms of color, were made in 4 serial nodes in DaVinci.  I did cheat a little - I used DaVinci's Deflicker tool to remove the flicker inherent in the footage due to the K3's spring-wound motor variance shooting at speed, and it worked a treat for basically 99% of all shots, save for the slow-mo shots and specific spots in others, but it absolutely made much of this footage look like it was shot on a crystal sync motor, which made me really happy.  

All in all, this was a great test for me of the 7219 stock in bright, sunny summer daylight conditions.  I do wanna test the stock out more in more dimly lit night interior and exterior settings, but that'll be for another day. 

In the meantime, hope you enjoy watching!  Included is my graded version and the ungraded version for anyone to tinker around with in terms of grading.  

Music is also made by me!  Professional composer here, too.  

Thanks so much for stopping by, folks!  Have a good one!

Best,
Adam
 


 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

Forum Sponsors

Visual Products

VidGear.com - Broadcast Video Warehouse

FJS International

Film Gears

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Serious Gear

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Cinematography Books and Gear



×
×
  • Create New...