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Jesse Andrewartha

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Everything posted by Jesse Andrewartha

  1. Hi! I'm looking for an Oxberry 16mm or super16mm shuttle. Let me know if you have one for sale! Cheers! -Jesse-
  2. Hmm, I don't agree... I like the idea that it's open. No freaking out... I storyboarded it this way and so was absolutely planned. I see your point that it could be really tightened up and that there's unnecessary footage in that shot. Noted. Simply put, my metering was poor; I was aiming for a deadline and by the time film was processed, telecined and returned, there was no time left to reshoot. Had to make do with what was there. Alot learned about my technique. Thanks, but I can't take the credit for the music. The original score was done by the band 'Thailand' for this film. He did a wonderful job... and in 48 hours! tuneinthailand dot blogspot dot com ha! Well, that wouldn't make it sound very appealing :) Thanks for your input... I really appreciate it.
  3. Storyboarded, shot and edited over the course of four months from April to July. Here are some details: Camera: Bolex H8 RX4 with ESM motor crystal sync, lens: 5.5mm Switar, 24fps Underwater housing: Bolex Film: R8 Tri-X and 100D. Processing: Niagara Labs Telecine: John Gledhill, Bitworks Inc. NLE: Kdenlive (a bit buggy, but it handles sequential jpegs so much better than FCPX) Enjoy and let me know if you have any comments, criticism or suggestions for the future... thanks! 5 SECONDS: ADVENTURES IN UNDERWATER HOCKEY
  4. Storyboarded, shot and edited over the course of four months from April to July. Here are some details: Camera: Bolex H8 RX4 with ESM crystal sync, lens: 5.5mm Switar. Underwater housing: Bolex Film: R8 Tri-X and 100D. Processing: Niagara Labs Telecine: John Gledhill, Bitworks Inc. NLE: Kdenlive (a bit buggy, but it handles sequential jpegs so much better than FCPX) Enjoy and let me know if you have any comments, criticism or suggestions for the future... thanks! 5 SECONDS: ADVENTURES IN UNDERWATER HOCKEY
  5. I wouldn't consider DIY as a saving in cost... I've priced out 35mm as well as 16mm reversal and negative, and it just does not stack up financially. Consider this... if you're shooting 16mm in 100' spools, and you have a lomo reel, that's two/three litres of chemicals per load. Each liter of chemicals cost $30, so you're already out $90 or you'd have to buy bulk... but that costs hundreds of dollars for each batch, there's issues of scale in terms of physically storing 50 gallons of each solution and the chemistry goes bad if not used within a few months. Plus the cost of equipment, drying space and environmental effects. If you get a extra-low volume processing unit, like a morse, you'll use much less developer, but you'll have extended processing times and more chance of uneven development... so there would be a learning curve to perfect your technique. So then it's about what you're willing to sacrifice.... money or time. Even if you bought an automated processing machine, they usually need a certain amount of feet to be processed to function well, otherwise chemistry crystallizes and clogs up rollers, goes bad and ruins your film. The average shooter will never have enough film to keep that machine in tip-top shape day in day out. In the end, if you want to DIY you have to want to do it for the joy of the process or want a specific effect not obtainable from your typical processing house. Nothing beats 14c - 21c per foot... -Jesse- Just re-read your post, and wanted to address specifically your desire to do test rolls DIY, and thought I'd add one more thing... if you're doing DIY you'll have more issues with quality control... if I'm doing test rolls I want to know that all processing variables are minimised.... doing my own development introduced some pretty wild curveballs, UNLESS you have a specific quality control pipeline for your processing and follow it rigorously. -Jesse-
  6. There IS antihalation backing in practically all modern 35mm still films, but it's not rem-jet. Motion picture films and still stocks have different processing and formulations but have the same features... I think one of the only film without an anti-halation backing now is b+w infrared. -Jesse-
  7. You're going to go through alot of film and chemicals with bad results until you stop and do some research. Developing color negative as a black and white neg? You need to know the rules before you break them. I'm all for you experimenting, and it sounds like you're having fun. But your questions problems are basic photoprocess issues that would be easily solved with an afternoon's reading. Get some information, try again with more understanding and you'll know what you're looking at, what you should expect to find and dramatic improvement in your results. A personal example: I developed a hybrid C-41/E-4/C-22 for 2443 color infrared film back in 1996... definitely not standard processing, but I did one months research and formulation before I put film to bath, and then the first images were of color charts and densitometry tests... boring, but it ended with consistent results and predictable processing, and some pretty pictures. -Jesse-
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