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Viktor Keene

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About Viktor Keene

  • Rank
    New

Profile Information

  • Occupation
    Other
  • Location
    Los Angeles, CA
  • My Gear
    Panasonic DVX100A I picked up on Craigslist for $200!
  • Specialties
    Screenwriter looking to shoot some of his own material.
  1. Freya, thanks for the detailed response. Ok, I think I understand a bit better "... on some shots you might want to accentuate the reds and on other shots you might want to accentuate the green channel in the way you desaturate the footage. A bit like putting B&W filters on the camera only doing it in post." Got it. I do remember in a film production class I took several years ago the mentioning of using filters when doing B/W film photography to accent different aspects of the B/W picture. So that makes total sense why I want to retain the option to do that in post. And thanks for pointing me in a good direction for microphones. A few "filmmakers" I know teased me about buying a Mini-DV cam and told me I should at the bare minimum get a HD DSLR, even a used one for $400-500 like a Canon T2i or T3i. But I'd have to get a more powerful computer, and I'd have to explore a real way of getting decent sound. Which would mean doing the dual system sound thing with a clapper/sticks which is frankly beyond the scope of my limited budget and patience. So that is another reason I thought the DVX for $200 was the Craigslist deal of the century. It's also a professional audio recording section too. What's the point of having pretty pictures if you can't hear the actors? I will start looking for some decent used xlr microphones for the camera right away (starting with your suggestions above) now that I have a better understanding of why I should try and get a "normal" color picture laid down to tape before I convert to B/W. I know I need to get out there and shoot tests. Simply wanted to try and wrap my head around the reasoning behind certain methods before getting out there and actually doing it. Thanks Freya and Chris for the responses. Very appreciated! V.K.
  2. Hey Chris, thanks for the response. Yes, that is what I have been hearing. But wouldn't turning down the color in camera gain "something" over leaving it on the normal defaults. My reasoning being if the color is turned down, wouldn't that ask less of the CCDs and image processing computer, and allow more focus on pure luminance? Even if the difference was on the order of simply 1 percent "better" B/W... That'd for sure be worth it. V.K.
  3. "I should shoot in color and convert to B/W in post. Lots of people are claiming that gives me the most options. And the Panasonic actually will force me to shoot color anyway because while I can control lots of picture settings... there is no B/W setting." At least that seems to be the prevailing opinion. But to get right to my question... if I turn down ALL the color information settings I can in camera, will I get a better B/W end result than simply converting more normally acquired color footage? It would make sense, right? The less color processing the camera has to do before it lays the signal down to tape, could mean a better image when it goes to B/W later? Possibly? V.K.
  4. Hello everyone. My name is Viktor Keene, and this being my first post to this forum, please go easy on any and all naivete presented herein. I'm a writer looking to shoot some of my own material and I recently purchased a DVX100A off Craigslist for $200. I know it's now a HD world (with 4K right on the horizon) but my research shows lots of well received films have been shot on the DVX100 series. And right now my computer would struggle with editing HD. I'm a writer, so I don't need massive computing power. Hence my computer is a bit behind the times, but for sure fast enough to do some work in SD. I've googled the heck out of this camera, done lots of reading on other forums and what I'm hearing is if I want to actually do some B/W work with this camera, I shoot should in color and convert to B/W in post. Lots of people are claiming that gives me the most options. And the Panasonic actually will force me to shoot color anyway because while I can control lots of picture settings... there is no B/W setting. My question is, if I'm NOT ever going to want to present my footage in color, are there some settings in camera that will deliver a better B/W conversion down the line rather than simply shooting a "more normal" picture profile. With color not at all being a consideration. I would want the cleanest original footage I can get my hands on in camera, right? Any and all thoughts are welcome. Thanks. V.K.
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