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Adam Weinberg

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About Adam Weinberg

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  • Occupation
    Cinematographer
  • Location
    New York
  • My Gear
    Sony A7S, Sony A7RII, Canon C100
  1. i'm shooting a music video mostly in 60P with lip sync, and want to be able to timecode slate it so, for example, i can shoot a 15 second segment mid-way through the song and know exactly where to slot it into my edit. the tricky part of course is that my camera's framerate is 60P while the project framerate will be 24P. i won't have access to a proper professional slate with timecode (not that i'm sure it would help?) - i was planning on holding up a laptop running timecode from the song to use as a slate. the issue is, if i'm playing back the song on set at 250% with timecode so that it matches the 60P being recorded on my A7S, that timecode obviously won't match the A7S footage when everything is slowed down to 24P. i'm wondering if my solution (though definitely not frame-accurate) is as follows: - export a video file of the song at 24P with a timecode overlay. - re-import that video into my editor and increase speed by 250% so the timecode is sped up as well. - play back that sped up video with sped up audio / timecode on set - slow everything down by 40% for editing and have a rough idea of where footage should fall in the timeline. any advice, better methods of doing this? note: i am using outdated editing software (FCP7) if that makes a difference to this workflow..
  2. i think we're going for the gnats gonad aesthetic actually, it's a music video :P thanks for the tips!
  3. haha. people. thanks for all the advice but .. the 120FPS shots are part of what will be a mostly 60P shoot, lots of tight shots with appropriately tight lighting, and most of the 120FPS shots will be MACRO. i don't need to shoot with 1 or 2Ks for macro work! :P i know light rentals are cheap, i just can't even begin to get into all the logistics .... i'm simply curious which sensor better handles noise at ISOs 2000 through 3200, it's just something i'd like to take into account! :P but i guess that's an awfully specific question and i should just find a way of determining this on my own..
  4. haha nope, rental! looking for feedback from someone specifically who has used 120FPS in relatively low-light with both the FS7 and Red.
  5. i would assume a Dragon sensor is more sensitive? a Dragon is a possible rental for us but the most important thing is the cleanest sensor at between 2000 and 3200 ISO at 120P in either 2k or HD. FS7 or Dragon seem like the best options for the budget ($400 to $500 per day tops for camera) based on my research but unfortunately don't have the budget for camera tests.
  6. as inexpensive as light rentals may seem, more lights are most likely not in the budget. maybe i can add on a 1k tungsten but it's doubtful. i know i'll have to shoot with a low aperture.. i was planning on shooting the 120FPS footage at a max of F2. my big question is just which sensor will have a better image (subjective, i know) / better noise handling in 120FPS at somewhere around 3200 ISO, a Dragon or a Sony FS7?
  7. apologies, couldn't figure out how to delete!
  8. thanks for the tip - unfortunately that's out of budget as i know both FS7 / Dragon owners and will be able to get discounted rates .. not enough Varicam35s out in the wild yet :P and yeah i know 120FPS is pushing it with that lighting gear but i need to give it a shot.. i may be able to light pretty close to talent and get away with something closer to 3200 ISO..
  9. I have a studio shoot coming up in which I need to shoot a bunch of 120FPS footage with limited lighting (probably no more than a 2' 4 bank Kino and 2x 1x1 LEDs). I unfortunately don't have the budget to do much camera testing, and I'm wondering if there is a consensus as whether the Sony FS7 or a Red Dragon will give me better high speed low light performance.. would appreciate any insight!
  10. EDIT - damnit, sorry I totally posted this in the wrong category.. oops I have a studio shoot coming up in which I need to shoot a bunch of 120FPS footage with limited lighting (probably no more than a 2' 4 bank Kino and 2x 1x1 LEDs). I unfortunately don't have the budget to do much camera testing, and I'm wondering if there is a consensus as whether the Sony FS7 or a Red Dragon will give me better high speed low light performance.. would appreciate any insight!
  11. thanks for your help david - glad to hear i haven't been oblivious to some strange focus technique for the past decade.
  12. wow - that's what i initially thought was the explanation seeing as you could use a Pro-Mist filter or something of that nature to flatter the subject .. but if this isn't a technique than i'm shocked at how often i've seen shots with this mistake make the cut in high profile films!
  13. hey everyone - first post here! so i thought i'd ask a question that has baffled me for years.. and might have a very simple explanation (i'm a professional cameraman who has been doing this for a decade, so i'm a little embarrassed to be asking): quite often in both large scale TV and film productions i'll notice on CUs of actor's faces with shallow DOF that the focal point is a good inch behind their eyes - the tops of the actor's ears are tack sharp, but their eyes and face are slightly softer. when i first started noticing this i assumed it was a mistake / sloppy focus pulling, assuming that an actor's eyes should always be their sharpest feature in a close up, but then i noticed this "technique"(?) more and more often and realized it must be intentional. it occurred to me that DPs might be going for a soft focus effect on the face because it's more flattering on the subject, but then .. why is this an effect i see so inconsistently, even within a particular film? curious how obvious of an answer this might be. be gentle, i'm self taught and never went to proper film school.
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