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Brian Mekdeci

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About Brian Mekdeci

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    New

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  • Occupation
    Other
  • Location
    Toronto and Boston
  1. My apologies Bill, when you were asking about a 2K scan vs a 1080p scan, I was comparing both in the 16:9 ratio. A 4:3 2K scan is better than a 16:9 2K scan for Super 8 mm films (as others here have pointed out) even if the final output will be 16:9 1080p. In order of quality for scanning Super 8 mm: 1. 2K 4:3 (2048 x 1536 pixels) 2. 2K 16:9 (2048 x 1152 pixels) 3. 1080p 16:9 (1920 x 1080 pixels) ‚Äč
  2. 1080p and 2K are almost the same thing, from a resolution perspective, so you're right - it's not going to be a big difference in quality. 1080p is 1920 x 1080 pixels 2K is 2048 x 1152 is pixels. However, since 2K has a few more pixels than 1080p, scanning at 2K gives you some breathing room to do things like crop the picture a little bit and end up with a really clean, good-looking 1080p output for HDTV, Blu-rays, etc.
  3. My mistake - I think this should probably have been posted in the Grading, DI and Telecine forum instead of the Super 8mm forum. I have just made the identical post over there, so if I moderator wishes to delete/close this post, please do. I tried deleting this post, but I can't seem to find a way. My apologies.
  4. I've been lurking here for some time, reading and doing some research. I have thousands of hours of Super 8mm home movie footage taken from 1967 to 1990 that I am looking to get transferred. I'm dealing with amateur footage that is naturally shaky from the handheld camera, has occasional focus problems, lots of panning around etc. LOTS of poorly lit indoor shots. The film itself is *ok* but it has some dirt, scratches, etc., that you would expect from 30-40 year old films that have been handled / stored by Average Joes. It also has lots of splices. After doing some research here, I c
  5. I've been lurking here for some time, reading and doing some research. I have thousands of hours of Super 8mm home movie footage taken from 1967 to 1990 that I am looking to get transferred. I'm dealing with amateur footage that is naturally shaky from the handheld camera, has occasional focus problems, lots of panning around etc. LOTS of poorly lit indoor shots. The film itself is *ok* but it has some dirt, scratches, etc., that you would expect from 30-40 year old films that have been handled / stored by Average Joes. It also has lots of splices. After doing some research here, I c
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