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Found 3 results

  1. According to Larry Smith's interview on American Cinematographer : Kubrick framed Eyes Wide Shut in the standard 1.85:1 format, primarily using a set of Zeiss Superspeed T1.3 spherical prime lenses, but occasionally opting to employ Arri’s T2.1 variable prime lenses or a zoom. (...) The results of the two-stop force-development are clearly evident in the film’s FIRST major setpiece (...) The scene was lit almost entirely with a huge wall of ordinary Christmas lights (...) " They were very low-wattage (...) The effect is obviously enhanced by the force-developing, which made the lights ap
  2. I oftne see DP's using china balls or space lights to bring up the ambient light in the room. Essentially, bouncing a light off the ceiling (I assume) does the same thing. I've been bouncing to bring up ambient but considering china balls. What are the advantages, if any, of using a china ball instead? Just that you have more control over the spill/throw by adding skirts? Is there any difference in the quality of light that is put out?
  3. Hi So, I'm shooting a job next week on our in-house semi seamless background. Cameras: 2 (3)x Canon 5D3, would love to not go under F 4.0 since the shallow depth is a bit too much for me below that for this situation. The setup is 4 girls discussing a topic, seated in a couch and two chairs. The film will end up being in black and white, but I would like to light it as to get a slight drop off of the light from the girls to the background, to make them stand out. As you can see on the photos, we have quite a few rigging options, but I havent really figured out exactly what to do wit
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