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Found 7 results

  1. I can't get enough of them and never know what I will find. Everyday is like Christmas. Recently I acquired some 16mm childbirth films from the 1940's. They were labeled 'baby being born.' They turned out to be a bonanaza. The views of 75 year old surgical rooms and dress is fascinitning in itslef, but there is so much more. The anesthesiologist continually drips ether out of a bottle on a dust mask for knocking the gal out. Another clip has the assistant pushing the baby back in the vagina as it tries to come out. Intertitle says something like: Retarded birth to allow for episiotomy. Maybe they wanted more $$ for the episiotomy? Although in 1940's I don't think healthcare was run as a big biz as it is nowadays. Most likely the baby's head was too big for the mommy's birth canal and it was not greed. I have a bunch more in the childbirth series, all sort of things, different types of Caesareans, twins birth, breech birth, etc. They were part of the 50+ films I scanned over the last couple weeks. Still need to PP'em, but I put 2 from the childbirth series up at the I.A. for your perusal. nsfw https://archive.org/search.php?query=childbirth teoli If the Retroscan blows up or gets stolen, I got my money out of it anyway. 50 films = about $8,000 for scanning fees. Now I just need to get the other 1050 films scanned! But I'm not in a rush. Still holding out hope for a benefactor to buy me a cheap Lasergraphics scanner. So, I'm in no hurry to scan all the films twice. And due to no room to work, I had to stow the Retroscan to make room for the copy stand work that I am doing now. And that Retroscan is tiny, so you know I'm cramped. A Japanese / American guy I met, that took a trip to Tokyo, told me they don't go by square feet in Tokyo... they go by square inches! That sounds like me. I'm always looking to find some more square inches! My dream house would be a house with 40 or 50 chrome wire shelving units lining the walls. Getting back to that retarded birth... I may make a 'Retarded birth to allow for episiotomy' production company with the clip of the baby being pushed back in the vag . That would be crazy huh! I love adding some craziness to the films, certain films that is. The more business like films and films that require more respect get more conservative production companies. But it is fun 'having fun' with the films. And when you are underground you can do as you please. I came up with crazy production company names after seeing so many stupid production company names on films where they were trying their best to not be stupid. I thought to myself, "Jeeesus, couldn't they find a better name than that?" So I figured, let me have some fun with it.
  2. Purchased years ago. Provenance was Bob Monkhouse collection. https://archive.org/search.php?query=Mary+Pickford+Excerpts+Bob+Monkhouse Developed a liking for Pickford after seeing her in M'liss. Plus scanning and working with this film developed more interest in Pickford. She was something. Get a copy of Mary Pickford: Muse of the Movies from your library. Great early days Hollywood coverage. Pickford wanted to burn all her movies when she died. What a nut. She was worried people would make fun of them. OK, maybe not a nut, but just an egomaniac. David Mullen was connected with the film as well.
  3. https://archive.org/details/ucla-11th-festival-of-preservation-2002-d.-d.-teoli-jr.-a.-c.-25 76 pages
  4. https://hyperallergic.com/538404/momas-dave-kehr-on-film-preservation-and-why-theres-never-enough-money/ Marking its 17th edition this year, the Museum of Modern Art’s To Save and Project festival celebrates newly preserved and restored films, both from the museum’s collection and other archives and distributors from around the world. This year’s slate included the premieres of restorations of silent films by D.W. Griffith and Raoul Walsh, a collection of amateur films in the National Film Registry, a previously unreleased PSA about age discrimination from Night of the Living Dead director George Romeo, and more. To Save and Project represents New York’s biggest film preservation event of the year. Hyperallergic spoke to Dave Kehr, a curator in MoMA’s Department of Film and former film critic at the Chicago Reader and the New York Times, about this year’s festival. The conversation ultimately broadened into how To Save and Project has evolved over the years, how digital has radically changed restoration practices, the funding difficulties archives face, and the generational shift occurring in the film preservation field. This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity. * * *
  5. I tested Vitafilm film treatment to see what curative effects it has, if any, on film decomposing with vinegar syndrome. films tested: Kodachrome B&W stock Test results: https://danieldteolijrarchivalcollection.wordpress.com/2018/11/25/test-results-for-vitafilm-treatment-of-vinegar-syndrome-16mm-films/ Notice: Weblink is safe for work. Website is not safe for work. If you are offended by adult topics do not wander from the link and you will be fine.
  6. Los Angeles Edition of Symposium to Address Confluence of Film Restoration and Digital Technologies in Service of Future-Proofing Cinema’s Legacies for Generations to Come The Reel Thing, a symposium dedicated to addressing the preservation and restoration of audio visual collections, will open with the U.S. premiere of a new restoration of the Oscar®-nominated 1960 film “La Verite” (“The Truth”). Two additional new 4K restorations also will be shown during The Reel Thing, including the U.S. premiere of Howard Hawks’ “Scarface” and the world premiere of Alex Cox’s “Sid and Nancy.” The Reel Thing takes place August 24 - 26 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood. The event offers insight into the latest preservation and restoration efforts throughout the motion picture community, and brings together experts who are using the latest technologies to make cinema’s legacy accessible for future audiences. Registration is now open, with discounts for industry groups and students, at www.the-reel-thing.org. In addition to restored screenings at The Reel Thing, this year’s program addresses vital topics of interest to preservation and restoration professionals around the globe, including sessions on the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in repairing assets; the explosion of digital formats and how to manage deliverables; optical sound recovery; and modern workflow solutions for safeguarding projects. Case studies will examine the restoration of “Scarface” (1932), the silent film “Behind the Door” (1919), and “The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez” (1982). An in-depth look at how ACES was used to reformat and archive “The Troop” rounds out these discussions. Speakers are expected to include Nicholas Bergh, End Point Audio; film director Marcus Dillistone; Miki Fukushima, Paramount Digital Archive; Mike Inchalik, PurePix Images; Wojtek Janio, MTI Film; Inna Kozlov, Algosoft Tech USA; Jim Lindner, Media Matters LLC; Josef Lindner, Academy Film Archive, AMPAS; Simon Lund, Cineric, Inc.; Andy Maltz, Science and Technology Council, AMPAS; Alexander Petukhov, University of Georgia; Michael Pogorzelski, Academy Film Archive, AMPAS; Peter Schade, NBCUniversal; Linda Tadic, Digital Bedrock; Sean Vilbert, Paramount Digital Archive; and Jason Wall, Metromedia Radio.* An opening night reception will be followed by the screening of “La Verite.” Directed by acclaimed French director Henri-Georges Clouzot and starring Brigitte Bardot, “La Verite” follows the trial of a young French woman (Bardot) accused of her lover’s murder. The film was nominated for an Academy Award® for Best Foreign Language Film, and was a box office hit in France. “La Verite” was digitally restored at 4K by Sony Pictures Entertainment in partnership with The Film Foundation and RT Features. Created and co-founded by Grover Crisp and Michael Friend, The Reel Thing supports the programs and services of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). For more information and to register for The Reel Thing, go to www.the-reel-thing.org.
  7. Saw the restored 35mm Technicolor print at the Museum of Modern Art, yesterday. Quite a nice experience. Considering the age of the print, the George Eastman House did an amazing job. I'd like to know the specific history of the print and I'm really surprised there's no information on the restoration on it. I e-mailed the George Eastman House in the hope of obtaining some. If it was indeed struck at the time the film was first released, it's a 76 year-old print. There was one scratch on the right side of the frame which lasted about 10 minutes, which made me think this print was most likely projected at one time or another. I also saw some color shifting within scenes, and some shots were a bit more faded than others, but all this could have been due to the age of the print. But that was more prevalent in the first 40 minutes of the film than anywhere else. The shots that blew me away - which made up the majority of the film - were the ones that featured crisp contrast and lush colors. Very sharp print, too. Overall, a great cinematic experience.
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