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Found 2 results

  1. Dear all, I once again need your advice on how to approach several night scenes that I'll be shooting in a week's time. The idea is to successfully construct a solid, uniform and believable nighttime ambience for the backgrounds (underexposed deep blue tones) and have dark silhouettes (or partially rimmed subjects) moving against them. In terms of providing a realistic, feasible reference, I guess I should mention the interior night scenes in Amour. The ideal result, however, would be something closer to the Skyfall fight scene in concept, but adjusted to the reality of the circumstances in which my story is going to take place (a family home without any big practical screens as backdrops). In terms of lighting, I was considering using daylight Kinos to construct the soft ambience, as mainly seen in the Amour stills. However, one possible issue that I might be having has to do with the camera + lens set-up. The MX sensor is notoriously underperforming in low light, and the only way to keep the shadows deep and noise-free is to shoot at ISO 320. Not only that, but being the space extremely tight we'll have to use a rectilinear 14mm lens at basically all times. Now, the only option I was given is a first generation 14mm Canon USM F2.8. I had a look at some tests, and optimal sharpness is achieved at around f8. How much light do you reckon I'll need? Are x2 Kinos for ambience + x1 575 HMI + occasional tungsten practicals going to be enough to light the interiors? Also, on a related note, are any of you guys aware of any way I could potentially battery-power fluorescent light tubes? In my head, it would make sense if a battery unit connectable to this mount existed. However, I can't seem to find anything of sorts on the internet. Let me know your thoughts, and as always, thank you very much for your time. Best, Filippo
  2. Boxx TV’s Meridian is Behind the Scenes on Oscar®-Nominated Films LOS ANGELES, February 20, 2013 — Three of this year’s Academy Award®-nominated films chose Boxx TV’s Meridian Wireless Microwave Broadcast System for reliable, 4:2:2 uncompressed video with zero delay. The Meridian was the system of choice for Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, Sam Mendes’ Skyfall and Kathryn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty, capping a busy year for the company headquartered in the UK, along with its reseller Boxx Communications in Los Angeles. “We are extremely proud that our technology contributed to the amazing stories told in these Oscar®-nominated films,” says Scott Walker, co-founder of Boxx TV. “We understand that everything is important during production. Image quality, reliability, and zero delay are all crucial. The Meridian provides high-image quality consistently, and is highly reliable whether you are shooting in high-desert heat on the hunt for Bin Laden, moving through a free-wheeling Tarantino project, or following the action of a legend like Bond. Working with the production teams of these incredibly accomplished films was an honor and a great experience.” For those situations that demand high-quality, zero-delay HD and SD live transmission, the Meridian is an affordable alternative to traditional COFDM systems with unprecedented success. The Meridian system uses license-exempt channels. Django Unchained’s five Oscar® nods include Best Picture and Best Cinematography, for last year’s Oscar® winner, Robert Richardson, ASC. There were two Boxx Meridian systems and handheld receivers used during the production of the multi-nominated Tarantino project. Skyfall grabbed a total of five nominations, including one for Best Cinematography for Roger Deakins, ASC, BSC. The production used five zero-delay Meridian systems, simultaneously, in conjunction with ALEXA cameras supplied by ARRI Media UK. Also earning five Oscar® nominations, Zero Dark Thirty used three systems and handheld receivers. The film’s Oscar® nods include one for Best Picture. Their customers’ nominations come on the heels of one of the company’s busiest years on record. “It is great to be associated with Oscar®-nominated projects and we’re thrilled,” adds Mark Walker, owner of Boxx Communications. “That said, we worked on many great projects last year, from feature films, to live coverage of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade, to episodic television shows such as Revenge and Modern Family; and on breaking news stories on stations such KABC,KNBC and KTLA. We are dedicated to making sure that our clients have great images, no delay, and an incomparable ease of use every time.” For more information, visit www.boxx.tv or www.boxxusa.com
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