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Found 5 results

  1. Hello, I was wondering, how close the Vision 3 films are to each other? Of course the sensitivity and grain differ, but are there much if any differences in terms of colour, contrast and perhaps sharpness too? After all they are being advertised as being intercuttable. If the obvious things like grain are not taken into consideration, would it be impossible to distinguish the different Vision 3 stocks from each other? To a slighty other thing, if the Vision 3 films are very similar, does it make a lot of sense to have 4 stocks that practically look the same? It shouldn't be a big thing to add an extra stop of ND or an 85 filter. Kind regards, Valter
  2. Mornin' everyone. That's my first post here at the site, so I'll try to be pretty clear (sorry bout the english, from Brazil in here). The thing is, we'll be shooting a college thesis film (a thriller themed short-film) this next semester. One of the locations is the living room/ kitchen of a country house. I'll get two setup's at it, the first one will be basically natural light with a bit of reflected backlight (we'll shoot with a steadi going round, so I'm trying to avoid any possible physical interference). My doubt would be what set or what kind of equipment I use for the second moment. The character will be entering an eerie aura, he's returning to the house after some weird stuff happens at the outside. What I want to do is a set that get the interior much darker than the first time, but not too much, so it can be clear that he's at daytime. Wanna use a strong marking contrast, but not to defined lines, I'll post a reference image so you guys can understand my point. Just for the knowing, the camera will be a Sony F-55, shooting at 2k, and we got plenty of lighting equipment to choose, so basically there is no strong limitation to what type of light we can use. Well, guess thats it, if you guys could get me any help it would be great! Thanks!! The reference, from 007 Spectre (bad quality, but great lighting) :
  3. Hi everybody, So at my school I'm going to have the luck to be the DP of a small short in 35mm. The worflow is this : Shoot 35mm the negative is developped and transfered in both mediocre HD for editing and decent 2K for grading and finishing. I know more or less how contrast works when you get a positive from the negative, that is : shooting the same negative at various EI + the positive give different looks (deeper blacks, more or less contrast in the shadows, less grain, more saturation etc etc) So I wonder how this applies when you scan the negative directly. I'll have a 500T, what if I rate it at 250 ? The guy from the lab told be he scans according to the middle gray chart (if we shoot one) What about things like blacks, whites, contrast, visible grain, saturation ? Thanks guys !
  4. Hey, I have read in several places that slower stocks yield a more contrasty look. Does anybody have any experience with this? Would Kodak 50D be noticeably more contrasty than, say, 250D? I am shooting a scene during an overcast day and am thinking that using 50D over 250D would give the image more contrast, as I am worried that the light may look too flat on the actor's faces. Alternatively, might it be better to go with a less contrasty stock and reserve option to add contrast in the grade?
  5. Hey, I have read in several places that slower stocks yield a more contrasty look. Does anybody have any experience with this? Would Kodak 50D be noticeably more contrasty than, say, 250D? I am shooting a scene during an overcast day and am thinking that using 50D over 250D would give the image more contrast, as I am worried that the light may look too flat on the actor's faces. Alternatively, might it be better to go with a less contrasty stock and reserve option to add contrast in the grade?
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