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Found 4 results

  1. Looking to purchase a 3 to 4 ton Grip truck ready to go with lights.
  2. Hi everyone, Again with some fundamentals about storytelling, with no doubt camera movements have a lot of effects on storytelling (dolly, Truck, panning, tilting, sliding, steadycam,..) or Handheld, how does camera movements effect the storytelling, what are the meaning of all those movements ? whats the difference for example between moving the camera toward the subject face in a fast way or in a slow way? when we use the camera steady on a tripod and when we slide it slowly ? what the difference between for example shooting an OTS handheld or steady on tripod or Sliding it ? there is a lot of camera movements does any one can advice on a book or an article discuss all those movements with their meanings please. Attached is screen shot from United 93, a very realistic movie from Paul Greengrass when he shot most of it handheld.
  3. Hello, I'm shooting a short film next month that has a few bicycling sequences, involving two characters - an older man and a younger boy. I'm working on finding an affordable, safe method that will give good results. I am shooting RED EPIC with Zeiss UP. A few notes about the coverage the director hopes to achieve: - Wide Shots in front of characters (biking towards camera) - closer shots (shoulder up MCU) on faces - wide shots on characters back (following from behind) - Profile bicycles on sidewalks A few factors to consider: the characters are going to be biking pretty slowly / casually. We are shooting in a small southern town, and the locations are all pretty smooth and well paved. This is a college thesis film, we're students so think micro with the budget. We have access to friends pick up trucks (and other automobiles). So my current plan of attack is to shoot from the bed of a pick-up truck. I was thinking securing a high hat and stabilizing with sand bags and ratchet straps. Here are the questions that arise: Is this approach the best given the budget restraints? Has anyone used a different method they would like to share? Going with this approach, what is the best way to stabilze a RED EPIC to a truck bed that will minimilize bump and shake and still allow me to operate and follow the action taking place? Does anyone have any pictures of rigs like this? I would love to see a concrete example of what I'm trying to achieve. Any adive for shooting the shots from behind the bicyclists - the only thing I could think of would be to drive the truck in reverse... I apoligize if this topic has already been discussed. I searched through the forums but didn't come across any results. ALSO: Here's a video with great smooth shots, it's a skateboard but I imagine the bicycles will move at a similar speed. -- -- wonder how this was done? Thanks. Drew
  4. Hello everybody, I'm new in this forum :-) I'm organising the making of a short film and, for a scene inside a lorry, I need it to look like it's raining outside. Browsing the web I've bumped into this topic, which I found really interesting. I've read that a possible solution (when you don't have a water source) is to use a watering can and connect one or two garden hoses with sprinkler rings. I though that then I could spray the water from the trailer over the front of the truck... the wind should then do the rest.... but apparently watering cans don't work that well, because they rely on gravity. Does anyone have any experience with this, or have any other suggestions? Thanks PS. The lorry would actually go downhill for the whole scene and the rain would have to last for about one minute.
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