Jump to content

220° Shutter opening VS. Shutter speed??!?


Jari Hakli
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello!

 

I just aquired a Super 8 camera. It is a Sankyo, Sound XL-420 Supertronic.

 

As I understand it only runs with two options of ASA film settings (whicj is determined by cartridge) so I must compensate the aperture manually if I am to use different film speeds.

 

But now the thing I was wondering about, although I can manipulate aperture there is no way of changing "shutter speed" like in ordinary still photography cameras. In specifications it says 220° Shutter opening. What is that? And how does that correlate to the "shutter speed" of ordinary cameras (1/125, 1/250 etc.)??

 

Thanks a lot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:blink: OK, after some hard brainwork I got to the conclusion that my camera with 220 degree shutter has Shutter speed of about 1/40s at 24fps.

 

I read also here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shutter_speed

 

...that movies have about 1/48 - 1/50 s shutter speed with 165-180 Shutter angles, what amazes me is then how moving objects don´t seem to be more blurred, with motion blur. I mean when I take photo with still photo camera at those speeds (below 1/60) and I shake camera it is motion blurry. Hmm...

 

Well, well. The footage I´ve seen on Super 8 don´t seem som blurred when there are objects in motion. Maybe the Shutter dial also can spin faster, and faster and faster and faster and... hehe .. .. :D hehe... and slower, and slower, slower.. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Sustaining Member

Your frames definitely do have motion blur. Look at some film with strong magnification, and you'll see still images with some blur on fast moving objects. Fast moving objects blur when you look at them with your eyes in the real world, too. If you shoot with a very small shutter angle and reduce the motion blur, it destroys the illusion of motion. You see sharp still images, sort of a high speed slide show. Remember "Saving Private Ryan"?

 

 

 

 

 

-- J.S.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your frames definitely do have motion blur. Look at some film with strong magnification, and you'll see still images with some blur on fast moving objects. Fast moving objects blur when you look at them with your eyes in the real world, too. If you shoot with a very small shutter angle and reduce the motion blur, it destroys the illusion of motion. You see sharp still images, sort of a high speed slide show. Remember "Saving Private Ryan"?

 

Aaah, OK-ok! I understand. Thanks for the info.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I had a Sankyo xl-620, it was the first super 8 I'd shot with, and a GREAT camera.

Very fast lens, 1.2 lens, plus the 220 deg. shutter. Great for low light.

 

One of the most interesting features was the ability to set the counter manually on the camera. So you could remove the film, and replace it with a different (which you may have already shot 10' on) cartridge, and adjust the counter by just using a pen (or something pointy) to dial in the counter.

 

Very cool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

Forum Sponsors

Visual Products

DMX-iT

FJS International

Film Gears

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Serious Gear

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Cinematography Books and Gear



×
×
  • Create New...