Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Roger Deakins'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Cinematography Forums
    • General Discussion
    • News & Press Releases
    • Lighting
    • Camera Operating
    • AC's & DIT's
    • Grip & Rigging
    • Visual Effects Cinematography
    • Grading, DI and Telecine
    • Students and New Filmmakers
    • Cameras Systems and Formats
    • Lenses & Lens Accessories
    • Camera Accessories & Tools
    • Film Stocks & Processing
    • Books for the Cinematographer
    • Cinematographers
    • In Production
    • On Screen
    • Cine Marketplace
    • Business Practices
    • Jobs, Resumes, and Reels
    • Please Critique My Work
    • Regional Cinematography Groups
  • Not Cinematography
    • Producing
    • Directing
    • Sound
    • Editing
    • Off-Topic
    • Forum Support

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Skype


Location


My Gear


Specialties

Found 5 results

  1. How did Roger Deakins keep the scene and the characters so organized and easy to follow during the chase scene in the last act of 1917? The chase begins just after George MacKay strangles the German soldier (about page 91 in the script). It seems like an impossible cinematographic challenge—low, shadowy lighting, constantly moving camera, all the characters about the same size and shape; yet it's clear the whole time who is doing what. Were there any particular techniques used? You can watch the sequence here: https://www.youtube.com/embed/wlbJZQQJ528
  2. Hi everyone! My name is Michael Lau, and I work for Sepia Films, an independent film production company based in Vancouver and LA. As big fans of this community, we are so excited to tell you about our documentary KEEPERS OF THE MAGIC, which spotlights cinematographers such as Roger Deakins, John Seale, Gordon Willis, Vittorio Storaro, Bruno Delbonnel, and Philippe Rousselot. It is being released across the US on August 7th through VOD (US Satellite/Cable), IVoD (iTunes, Google Play, etc.) and Home Video (Amazon). KoTM is both an homage to the great films of our time and a personal exploration of the artists that created them. It features candid interviews and intimate insights into the work of these legendary cinematographers amongst others (including Directors George Miller and Sam Mendes) as they discuss their careers and most memorable movie moments. The film is the passion project of Vic Sarin, an eminent DP/Director in his own right, who wanted to celebrate the masters of this largely unsung art form. You can find more information here: https://www.imdb.com...2/?ref_=nv_sr_1 And a link to the trailer here: . Our goal is to give cinematographers the recognition that they seldom receive; but to do so, we need to reach as many people as possible. Please don't hesitate to ask any questions! Michael
  3. Could some of you tell me why is Roger Deakins so much admired, so popular and so loved? At first, I thought that much of his popularity comes from his noticeable online presence, and that colourists, people in digital manipulation of images, and indie filmmakers loved him more than cameramen, but there’s much more to it than that. I had to ask after seeing this post by David Mullen: Why is Roger Deakins so special? What are some of his trademarks? What is he known for? What is some of his greatest work in your opinion, both whole films and particular scenes? What is it in his work that fascinates people so much?
  4. Variety did an article with a Roger Deakins interview regarding Hail Caesar and his return to film. I'm kinda stunned by what he said. "So regarding shooting film, did the old anxiety come back, worrying about whether you got the shots while waiting on the lab reports and whatnot? Well, you know, it’s like they say riding a bike. I can’t ride a bike myself, but I’m sure it’s the same. It’s fine. We did have some problems. We had some stock issues and stuff like that, which was really disconcerting. And I’ve heard that’s happened to a lot of people lately, you know, stock and lab problems. That’s unnerving. I mean I never really remember having those kind of problems before. But it makes me nervous now. I don’t want to do that again, frankly. I don’t think the infrastructure’s there." Do you ever find yourself trying to convince the Coens to go digital? I think they were. I don’t really know, but apparently Ethan at some point was talking about shooting the next film digitally. And then it turned around. They’re really debating it. I was in Albuquerque shooting “Sicario” and they were talking about it and they said, “I don’t know how you feel about it, but I think we want to go on film.” And I said, you know, “I don’t mind. I’ll shoot it on a cell phone if you like. I don’t mind. I really don’t.” Maybe one of these days they’ll go that route. Oh, I think they will. As I say, just the technical problems with film, I’m sorry, it’s over. I don't get it, what are those problems with film stocks is he even talking about, availability or something?! (I think I read him commenting on that somewhere before that). Quite a few projects lately are being shot on film without any problem whatsoever, hell, there are a few of them in Sundance right now. I don't know, it kinda sounds to me like he just got used to digital and that going back to film for him feels like a step back, he does sound really biased to me and blaming the infrastructure (once again which seems to be working just fine for many folks) to justify not shooting on film anymore.
  5. I was wondering what you think contributes to making a cinematographer better than average, and even truly great. In terms of not only the success of his career, but also his craft, self discipline and general habits we might learn from. Roger Deakins, Emmanuel Lubezki, Gordon Willis come to mind, but also anyone you personally admire who might not be as well known. Share your thoughts, and also feel free to post about any time you met a cinematographer who you feel is a role model to you, and what kind of impression they made.
×
×
  • Create New...