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Found 5 results

  1. https://archive.org/details/storagepreservationmotionpicfilmteolijr.a.c.39
  2. Someone told me that the original Star Wars had faded red and all that is left are digital copies. Do you think that is true? I imagine the dye transfer films should be pretty good for color. But what about the films that were not Technicolor IB? In my archive I have Kodachrome 16mm going back to 1939 that looks pretty good. I had read the early Kodachrome version faded. I've found a few early 1938 samples of Kodachrome that faded somewhat and they verify Kodak changed the formulation.
  3. The Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) has announced a robust program for its annual conference, which brings together over 600 experts to share perspectives on the latest methodologies and technologies being used in the acquisition, preservation, restoration, exhibition and use of audiovisual media. The event runs Nov. 30 to Dec. 2 at the InterContinental New Orleans, and is preceded by two days of workshops, including a Community Archiving Fair, a Hack Day, and a presentation of The Reel Thing, a technical symposium that explores recent restoration projects. A detailed schedule and session descriptions can be found on the AMIA conference website: www.amiaconference.net. Over 40 seminars will address topics such as the management of efficient transfer and migration workflows; strategies for licensing archives; updates on tools and processes in annotation, metadata, and modeling; approaches for handling and protecting rare elements; and case studies on the preservation of important analog and digital collections. Screenings will include AMIA’s Archival Screening Night – a program of rarely seen clips from archives around the world; “Dawson City: Frozen in Time” followed by a Q&A with director Bill Morrison; and “Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People,” a documentary offering devastating insights into the origins of stereotypic images and their development at key points in U.S. history. This year, AMIA shines a spotlight on efforts being made to preserve and provide access to underrepresented archives. Specialists from Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Asian/Pacific American Institute, Israel Film Archive, Jack G. Shaheen Collection and the Shoah Foundation, to name a few, will share their experiences and offer their expertise. Highlights include: · The New Preservationists: How Documentary Filmmakers are Excavating Rare Media Artifacts to Tell Their Stories – A new emphasis on archival-based programming from Netflix, Amazon, HBO, Hulu, ESPN, and other international players has shined a new light on archives. With Academy Award® and Emmy®-nominated filmmaker Robert Stone and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Shola Lynch, this session will explore the craft of the archive-inspired film and show how these projects themselves are vehicles for preservation efforts. · Reel News: Broadcast Videotape and the Historical Record of Resistance – A significant portion of moving image records from U.S.-based social movements in the 20th century, including the struggle for African American, Chicano/a, LGBTQ, and civil and human rights, exists on endangered 2-inch videotape. This panel will screen footage and illuminate the vital, socially relevant content emended on tapes, while providing attendees with strategies for developing initiatives at their own institutions for preserving this material and presenting it to the public. · Let the Computer and the Public do the Metadata Work! – The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), with Pop Up Archive, has created more than 71,000 transcripts of historic public broadcasting recordings using the open source Kaldi speech-to-text software. At this panel, WGBH will share a game called FixIt to crowdsource correction of speech-to-text generated transcripts, and panelists will discuss potential computational linguistic tools and methodologies to enhance discoverability of digital media collections. · The Great Migration: A Public Digitization Workflow – The Great Migration is a public digitization program initiated by the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Visitors are invited to bring their home movies, on any format, to the museum and have them inspected and digitally scanned by NMAAHC media preservation staff. This session highlights how museum preservation efforts and public education coalesce, revealing basic steps for personal digital archiving while building the nation's largest research collection of African American home movies. “Every year, AMIA’s annual conference brings together the largest gathering of the restoration/preservation community who are making incredible progress in their work to ensure treasures from the past are accessible for the future,” said AMIA President Andrea Kalas. “AMIA members are the cultural caretakers of important audiovisual media, and this event marks an incomparable opportunity to learn and connect with a worldwide contingency of professionals in the field.” To register, visit the AMIA Conference website for full details: http://www.amiaconference.net/
  4. The Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) announces that Dennis Doros, co-owner of Milestone Films, has been elected president of the international association by AMIA members. Doros will be inducted into office at the annual AMIA Conference in New Orleans (Nov. 29 – Dec. 2), when he will begin a two-year term. He succeeds Andrea Kalas, who has led the organization forward for the past two years. AMIA members have also elected three new directors to the Board of Governors: Casey Davis Kaufman, senior project manager for the WGBH Media Library and Archives and project manager for the American Archive of Public Broadcasting; Andrea Leigh, moving image processing unit head at the Library of Congress National Audio Visual Conservation Center; and Yvonne Ng, senior archivist at WITNESS, an organization that supports people using video to protect human rights. They join board members Jayson Wall of The Walt Disney Studios, consultant and doctoral student Lauren Sorensen, doctoral student/field scholar Melissa Dollman, John Polito of Audio Mechanics, and Teague Schneiter from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. AMIA is the world’s largest professional organization dedicated to the acquisition, description, preservation, restoration, exhibition and use of audiovisual media. The association’s programs help members stay abreast of the latest methods and technologies, ensuring that our cultural treasures are accessible for future generations. The AMIA membership includes archivists, educators, librarians, digital asset managers, technologists, collectors, genealogists, filmmakers, historians, consultants, studio executives, environmentalists, distributors, and broadcasters from around the world — all of whom are actively engaged in the art and science of media preservation and presentation. Doros comments, “I am deeply honored to have the opportunity to serve AMIA, an organization that has meant so much to me both personally and professionally. The friendships, connections, and camaraderie I have found here have helped me discover, research, and preserve some of the most challenging and rewarding projects of my career. I am inspired on a daily basis by this passionate and supportive international community. I know that working together, we can bring greater diversity, fairness, and outreach to our field while saving a lot of great moving images for generations to come.” Doros began his career at Kino International in 1984, where he was responsible for restoring Erich von Stroheim’s Queen Kelly and Raoul Walsh’s Sadie Thompson, both starring Gloria Swanson. In 1990, he co-founded Milestone Films with his wife, Amy Heller. Working with film archives and labs around the world, they have restored and distributed a wide range of independent films that include works by Shirley Clarke, Charles Burnett, Margot Benacerraf, Billy Woodberry, Kathleen Collins, Marcel Ophuls, and Kent Mackenzie. Filmmakers Martin Scorsese, Barbara Kopple, Steven Soderbergh, Thelma Schoonmaker, and author Sherman Alexie have worked with Milestone to promote special restoration projects. For the past 12 years, Doros has been a consultant to Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Doros and Heller have been awarded the National Society of Film Critics’ Film Heritage Award five times and first Special Archival Award; the International Film Seminars’ Leo Award; the NY Film Critics Circle’s Special Award twice; the LA Film Critics’ first Legacy of Cinema Award; and a Film Preservation Honors award from Anthology Film Archives. Doros served three terms on the AMIA Board of Directors, and was the 2016 winner of AMIA’s William S. O’Farrell Volunteer Award in recognition of his contributions to the field. For more information, visit www.amianet.org.
  5. LOS ANGELES (August 15, 2016) - The 38th edition of The Reel Thing, a three-day symposium addressing audio/visual restoration and archiving, will explore the constantly evolving ecosystem of film and digital restoration and preservation. This year's program will examine legacy film restorations and showcase modern technologies being used to futureproof collections and keep them viable for future display and distribution formats. The event will take place August 18-20 at the Academy's Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood. In addition to discussions with industry leaders, premiere screenings of several restored films are scheduled, including the original, uncensored version of John Huston's BEAT THE DEVIL; Marlon Brando's single directorial project ONE-EYED JACKS; and Robert Altman's MCCABE AND MRS. MILLER. Created and co-founded by Grover Crisp, executive vice president of asset management for Sony Pictures, and Michael Friend, director of digital archives and asset management at Sony Pictures, the event supports the programs and services of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). "At The Reel Thing, our presenters continue to demonstrate the recovery of the achievements of the first century of cinema even as we assess the challenges presented by the first decades of digital moving image culture," says Friend. "Ever-more effective tools are being devised to address the mechanical and optical challenges of film restoration, and significant new technologies for the long-term preservation of digital data are rapidly evolving. At the center of this activity, technicians, archivists and the rest of the subjective human audience for cinema continue to examine, refine and redefine our understanding of the notion of preservation for both analog and digital moving image art." "It is an exciting time for the archival community as we address the changing technologies that help to preserve collections and our cultural heritage, whether it is film, audio, video or any flavor of digital you choose," notes Crisp. "Our audience is interested in the problems and potential solutions surrounding how we can cope with the issues we encounter in this still hybrid analog/digital landscape we find ourselves in." Presentations at The Reel Thing will feature expert-guided discussions on such topics as UHD/HDR, scanning, color correction, frame rate adjustment, color space and gamut. Case studies on the approach to preserving legacy films in higher quality standards and the processes applied will highlight several panels. Audio restoration will also be explored, looking at the latest technologies in sound. Speakers are expected to include: Michael Pogorzelski, Academy Film Archive; John Polito, Audio Mechanics; David Marriott, Lynette Duensing and Craig Rogers, Cinelicious; Lee Kline and Ryan Hullings, The Criterion Collection; Chris Reynolds, Deluxe Entertainment Services Group; Steve Kochak, Digital Preservation Laboratories, Inc; Wojtek Janio, Fixafilm; Andrew Oran, FotoKem; Gilles Barberis, L'Immagine Ritrovata; and Snowden Becker, UCLA, among others. For more information and to register for The Reel Thing, go to www.the-reel-thing.org. The symposium offers several registration options, as well as discounts for certain industry groups and students.
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