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Found 9 results

  1. Well, this is not how to shoot video, but still photographs, and it's been out there for about two weeks now. I wanted to ask you what do you think about it. Certainly none of you need this, but specifically I wanted to know what's up with this "lower the exposure" when shooting during golden hour? In my view, the photo would've looked much better if they let the exposure alone, even if the part of the face are overexposed. (BTW, does that golden hour look a little bit like not yet golden hour? I think that at one point it's as if you can just about see that someone has just warmed up the light a bit in postproduction or the camera changed white balance in that instant.) https://www.apple.com/iphone/photography-how-to/ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHFlHpPjgk72JW5vfYlzycSgG_Z6EV4hK
  2. Creating Magic Hour on a Stage http://www.cinematographydb.com/2015/10/lighting-techniques-creating-magic-hour-on-a-stage/ Check out my latest tutorial on creating magic hour lighting from scratch on a sound stage. I learned all of these combine techniques from multiple DPs, gaffers, and key grips. I hope you find it helpful. The illustrations were created in Maya with a Plug-In that I'm developing for cinematographers to be able to shoot and light in 3D for preproduction. I'd love any feedback you have or suggestions for future topics. Cheers, Matt
  3. How to Control a Large Light Source http://www.cinematographydb.com/2015/11/how-to-control-a-large-light-source/ In this tutorial I share my process for lighting a scene with a large light source and then controlling the unwanted spill. I'd love your feedback on the tutorial and the illustrations. There has been some really great discussions on Reddit and directly on the post. Cheers, Matt
  4. Kino Flo Celeb: Augmenting Natural Daylight http://www.cinematographydb.com/2015/11/kino-flo-celeb-augmenting-natural-daylight/ I posted on this forum years ago when I was struggling with lighting a daylight loft music video. I didn't understand how to use large light sources and I didn't know what size HMI's I needed to balance the existing daylight. I wanted to share something that covered the concept of base exposure. I'd love to hear your feedback. Cheers, Matt
  5. Lighting Techniques: Chimera and 12×12 Diffusionhttp://www.cinematographydb.com/2015/10/lighting-techniques-chimera-and-12x12-diffusion/ I'm posting a new Cinematography Design Tutorial every Friday. This week I show a technique for creating a large light source. I'm starting with really basic/fundamental techniques and the moving into full on lighting setups. I'd love to get the feedback from the members of this forum. I've learned so much of what I know right here. Cheers, Matt
  6. This tutorial will teach you various techniques to sync audio and video in Adobe Premiere Pro and CC. Please like and subscribe for more tutorials.
  7. This quick tutorial will teach you a very simple technique to batch export multiple clips from Adobe Premiere Pro and CC. If you have any questions feel free to ask.
  8. Hey everyone! This is a continuation of the thread where I was asking for some ideas on how to filter my 9mm lens since the matte box was showing in the field of view. Please see the original thread (http://www.cinematography.com/index.php?showtopic=65936&hl=) as the suggestions and information contributed were quite helpful! (Thanks to Gregg, Miguel & Dennis.) DISCLAIMER: I haven't shot anything using this set-up yet, but it looks like it will get the job done. I am always hesitant to post any kind of tutorial, but I think this is pretty neat! So here's the solution I came up with :) ... Items required: -Alligator clips -Household pull-string with tassel at end -Gaffer's tape My first concern is always keeping all of my equipment in excellent condition. It was obvious that I would need to place the filter directly in front of my 9mm Cooke lens, but I really didn't want to put any kind of tape on the filter itself. So... 1- Fold 2 very small pieces of gaffer's tape onto each side of the filter with the non-adhesive sides touching the filter. These pieces act as a cushion so that the alligator clips never touch the surface of the filter. 2- Attach the alligator clip to the upper right-hand corner of the filter. 3- Put the pull-string through the circular notch on the front of the camera until it reaches the tassel. Tape the beaded end of the of the pull-string to the circular end of the alligator clip. This is your first fastener. 4- Pull the string back so that the filter is close to the lens and the tassel falls to the bottom of the camera on the left-hand side. Repeat steps 1 & 2, then tape the tassel end of the pull-string to the second alligator clip on the lower left-hand corner of the filter. This is your second fastener. 5- At this point, you may need to start attaching some gaffer's tape - first to the pull-string & then to the camera - for some tension. 6- Repeat steps 1 & 2, and attach the third (and final) alligator clip to the lower right-hand corner of the filter. This is your third fastener and it is a "floating clip" in that it does not get attached to the pull-string. Put gaffer's tape on the circular end of the alligator clip and attach it to the right-hand side of the camera. 7- Adjust for tension as needed. You should still have the ability to adjust the f-ring. Here are some pictures of the final product! Sorry I didn't take any step-by-step pictures, but I hope this helps for anyone with the same issue! It may not look sexy, but it seems like a pretty good rig for $5.00. Thanks for reading and comments/critiques are always welcome! Happy New Year!
  9. Finally finished writing my article after several months of research and tests. I'm putting it out there, so if anybody in the future is interested they can learn everything they need from this article to get them going. Article Includes: - The film advantages and disadvantages. - Development times. - Procedures. - Workarounds. And much more information. Thanks https://republicphoto.squarespace.com/s/ECN-DEV4.pdf
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