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Canon 1014 XLS lap dissolve - risky..?


Stephen Gordon

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I've been testing a recently acquired 1014 XLS before the return window expires.

So far everything checks out - fps at all variables, interval timer at all settings, self-timer at both 10 and 20 second settings - in short the electronics seem to be A-OK despite the camera being stored in a loft for 10 years!

I purchased it for two specific projects (weddings in low ambient light) after which I want to sell it as 'fully tested with film'. The only thing I haven't tested yet is the lap dissolve and my question is whether users of that camera have experienced problems with that function? It involves the camera's electronics rewinding the film in the cartridge and from what I've learned on this forum film stock in any current Kodak cartridge is not the same (thickness I think..?) as users would have been shooting when the camera was released. So maybe a difficult strain on the motor..? Has anyone done this recently with success?

I know dissolves can be easily accomplished in post with scanned film but I like the idea (potentially) of a time machine from the Seventies arriving back to the world for which it was intended in perfect working order! Hence my desire to test and report back.

Any thoughts appreciated!

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HI Stephen, the best advice I can give in this scenario is to test beforehand, especially if it's footage you plan to use as part of that wedding package. But to answer your question, it should work without issue if the camera is working properly. All the camera is doing when rewinding the film is shoving a small length of film back into the feed side of the cartridge, so the film is not actually rewinding onto the core. That is why it's limited in how far it will rewind. I've done it within the last year or so with my Canon using fresh film stock without any issue. You'll want to avoid doing those rewinds at the head or tail of the cartridge though to avoid issues. Make sure you've shot a few feet first or still have several feet remaining.

It's kind of funny because I'm on the forum tonight seeking advice on reloading Single-8 cartridges for almost the same reason: doing in-camera effects. Some might question the sensibility of this in today's world of editing but, in my case, I still enjoy shooting stuff for projection just for the fun of it. It's reason enough, I figure. Good luck!

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I haven't done dissolves recently on this camera, however I do know that it is a great and strong camera and I once did a lot of filming with a 1014XL-S, hours of footage. I used the lap dissolve several times and every time it worked perfectly. These days however I'd probably be inclined not to push my luck using in-camera functions such as this, and just do the dissolve digitally in post. A couple of years ago when I last filmed with my old 1014XL-S the cartridge jammed on me while just filming normally at 24fps. I soon fixed the jam though by taking out the cartridge and whacking it on my leg twice. Another thing to try if the cartridge jams is to turn the uptake wheel on the back of the cartridge clockwise until snug. All the best with it.

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Scott - Thank you very much indeed for that clear explanation of what is actually happening inside the cartridge! I will follow your advice exactly and BTW this is a 'test' cartridge to see what the 1014 XLS will do. So far the only control which does not work is the exposure compensation dial which will not rotate in either direction. Very reassuring to hear you've had success using the lap dissolve with current stock. I'm about 20 feet into the cart so will go ahead and try it out this weekend. I agree the whole point of S8 is the fun you can enjoy - I'm just sorry I can't be as helpful in relation to your own enquiry not having used Single 8. I hope the forum will provide an answer for you and thanks again.

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Hey Stephen, good look with your shooting. When you get the film back, let me know how it went. The Canons are great cameras. You may find you want to keep it, especially if you're incorporating Super 8 into your wedding video package. It's a fantastic bonus that people really seem to enjoy.

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19 hours ago, Stephen Gordon said:

Thanks Scott - I will certainly let you know the results (by posting into this thread I guess..?). And I think you are right: it's a beautiful piece of kit and if the results are good I'll be very reluctant ti let it go!

Hey Stephen, yeah update here, that way your results may help someone in the future. Cheers!

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