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Sekonic 758D vs 758 Cine


Orlin S
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Hi there,

 

I'm looking for a new light meter. I'm pretty sure that the Seconic 758 Cine, would be the best choice for me, but today i went to a used equip store and i found used sekonic 758D in a very good condition, for half it's retail price. So my question is, does it worth spending twice for the Cine version ?

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Well, I dont use it day in day out lately - so I find myself struggling with my memory on how to use it...

 

That being said, the obvious factor of the cine over the standard is the shutter angle adjustment and the direct fps entry option - that way you're not having to think about calculating the shutter speed, which can take time if you're changing either often ... then again, with some individuals that actually works against you as you have a layer of control abstraction removing you from the reality of the exposure. Feel free to use that as justification that the standard version is still a good choice laugh.gif.

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First, thank you very much for your response. Second, when I use the shutter speed, instead of FPS by simply typing the 2x fps value ( 25fps = 1/50....120fps = 1/240) i'll get the corect exposure for 180 degree right ?

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Funny thing I just bought mine, I couldn't afford/not really wanting to fork out that much, I'm a Cinematographer and Photographer so I went for L-758D I find that It's best for both worlds, if you can afford the Cine then by all means get it, but you can defiantly be ahead by using the D or DR.

 

I apologize if this isn't what your asking but It sounds like you want to convert Shutter degree to shutter speed.

 

1/32 = 270

 

1/48 = 180

 

1/50 = 172.8

 

1/60 = 144

 

1/96 = 90

 

1/120 = 72

 

"(24 x 360) / Shutter Angle (i.e 8640 / xx where xx is xx degrees).

 

So the shutter speed for 144 degrees:

 

8640 / 144 = 60 (i.e 1/60th sec)"

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Funny thing I just bought mine, I couldn't afford/not really wanting to fork out that much, I'm a Cinematographer and Photographer so I went for L-758D I find that It's best for both worlds, if you can afford the Cine then by all means get it, but you can defiantly be ahead by using the D or DR.

 

I apologize if this isn't what your asking but It sounds like you want to convert Shutter degree to shutter speed.

 

1/32 = 270

 

1/48 = 180

 

1/50 = 172.8

 

1/60 = 144

 

1/96 = 90

 

1/120 = 72

 

"(24 x 360) / Shutter Angle (i.e 8640 / xx where xx is xx degrees).

 

So the shutter speed for 144 degrees:

 

8640 / 144 = 60 (i.e 1/60th sec)"

 

Thx for the answer. I always try to keep the 180 degree when shooting, because of the motion, so i was curios if it's the same, when i enter for example 180 degree + 120 fps On 758 CINE version, and when i just put 25 fps and 1/240 shutter speed On 758D version. I should get the same result right ?

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1/240 on a D will give you the same result as 180deg and 120fps on a cine yes

 

Not sure about "25 fps and 1/240 shutter speed On 758D version" - you cant enter 25fps on the D version, and that combo would imply a shutter angle smaller than 180deg...

Manual says, that u can enter these frame rates : 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 18, 24, 25, 30, 32, 36, 40, 48, 50, 60, 64, 72, 96, 120, 128, 150, 200, 240, 256, 300 and 360 f/s. But still I think that setting fps is not necessary when u enter the correct shutter speed.

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You can enter those on the D ?

 

oh wow ... wasn't aware - jeez just get the D - especially if you're sticking with 180deg shutters...

 

and yes the correct shutter speed is the correct shutter speed so go figure wink.gif

I wasn't aware that it could either, can some one confirm this

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I'm actually so surprised atm, its real you just have to keep scrolling till it goes into fps, the exposure is based on 180degree shutter angle and for non cine meters just change your ISO sensitivity to -1/3 for 160 degrees and +1/3 220. Nice find.

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Sure its not a combination manual ?

 

(too lazy to find it and checktongue.gif)

[L-758DR/758D]

The following Cine Speeds will be displayed:

2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 18, 24, 25, 30, 32, 36, 40, 48, 50, 60,

64, 72, 96, 120, 128, 150, 200, 240, 256, 300 and 360 f/s.

[L-758CINE]

The following Cine Speeds will be displayed:

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 25, 30, 32, 36,

40, 48, 50, 60, 64, 72, 75, 90, 96, 100, 120, 125, 128,

150,180, 200, 240, 250, 256, 300, 360, 375, 500, 625,

750 and 1000 f/s.

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PAge 39 of the manual as well, you can create filter compensations. when on set I've found those tremendously helpful. sure its just small math, but very simple to see certain exposures at literally a glance and switch betwen filter compensations

Edited by Mark Baluk
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Yeh, seems strange indeed !

 

I consider myself lucky as I got my cine when they first came out through a Hong Kong outfit who seemed to price the models with only a $10 difference - but heck even $10 is quite a lot considering the lack of extra functionality...

 

Even the cine makes big jumps in fps, 40 to 48 for instance - not that the difference between 44fps and either of those speeds is that great in terms of exposure. Summed up succinctly as: 'meh'

 

Still though, that 'cine' tag is pretty cool looking - and only the cool kids have that rolleyes.gif

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  • 3 years later...
  • Sustaining Member

I'm not sure you'd want to, to be honest. I have the Cine. And although I like having a combined spot and incident meter in one, The L-758C must have one of the worst user interfaces ever created. Every single function you want to access, requires a literal finger ballet to press all of the various buttons required to access and adjust anything.

 

Want to adjust your exposure compensation for filters? Sure, your only option is to shift things in 10% of a stop increments - which means you'll be spinning that dial for minutes just to plot in a couple of stops of exposure compensation.

 

It's just horrid.

 

And when you can't use all of these fancy features that you're paying so much for (because they're simply to awkward to access quickly and efficiently), well... what's the point in paying so much?

 

Problem is, is there a better option for a combined meter? One that's as compact, but easier to operate?

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  • Sustaining Member

Interesting. Thanks Sat I'll look into it. I actually would be open to a trade if it meant getting less Meter-Rage on set.

 

And AA batteries would be a dream - trying to find the bloody CR123A (or whatever they're called) batteries that the L-758 needs is a nightmare.

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