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Shooting test pics for Kodak Vision2 50D/7201 Super16mm - equivalent 35mm emulsion?


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The film is daylight balanced, and I have to use artificial light to shoot this project. I wanted to test out a couple different light sources/levels on a similar daylight film, even if it's not the exact emulsion. I want to be sure of the color registration before shooting the Super16. This project is using up an old 400ft load that's been sitting around, so it's a small enough project that I can't shoot a whole load of tests. Thanks though!

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probably the closest still film emulsion would be the portra 160. It might lie somewhere in between the NC and VC. The latest portra line is closest to the Vision 3 stock. Use daylight balanced lights inside. The stock, '01, is rather color forgiving.

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I would imagine that Ektar 100 is probably the closest equivalent to 50D. It was the first still film from Kodak that was based on their motion picture products - Ektar was introduced in fall 2008, while the Portra films were reformulated in late 2010 / early 2011. I usually rate Ektar 100 at 64 or 50.

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The general rule for exposing old film is that you subtract one stop of speed for every decade past the expiration date in order to compensate for base fog. The expiration date for film is typically 2 to 3 years after manufacture; higher-speed films are affected significantly more quickly than slower films, and color films are affected more so than black and white. I've seen 25 ASA black and white film from the 1970s exposed 40 years later and come out looking great, so 50 ISO color film that's only 5 years old should have negligible loss of speed given proper storage.

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It's been stored at a very stable, dry "room temperature" for 5 years so it sounds like I'm ok. I'll probably overexpose it just a half stop or something anyway.

 

 

One more dumb question - when I'm shooting single frames of film, as in making a stop-motion film, I meter as if I'm shooting with a still camera loaded with 50 ISO film, right?

 

forgive me, I am super rusty on this camera (XTR-PROD), as I haven't shot anything other than still film in 5 years.

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It's been stored at a very stable, dry "room temperature" for 5 years so it sounds like I'm ok. I'll probably overexpose it just a half stop or something anyway.

 

 

One more dumb question - when I'm shooting single frames of film, as in making a stop-motion film, I meter as if I'm shooting with a still camera loaded with 50 ISO film, right?

 

forgive me, I am super rusty on this camera (XTR-PROD), as I haven't shot anything other than still film in 5 years.

 

 

You'll have to find the manual for that camera and figure out what the shutter speed is at single frame. Unlike a still camera with a shutter that evenly sweeps across the film in a straight line, your motion picture camera shutter is a triangle cut out of a wheel. So, you can get equivalent shutter speeds to still, but it's pretty rare to be able to specifically set the shutter speed itself like you do with a still camera. Many have a variable shutter so that you can adjust the "shutter angle", which is the size of the cut-out in the wheel. But, you still need to calculate the "shutter speed" base on how fast the wheel spins and how big the angle is.

 

Here's a decent link about shutter angle.

 

http://provideocoalition.com/freshdv/story/shutter_speed_vs_shutter_angle

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  • 2 weeks later...

OK, so the manual says that "during single frame operation, each frame is 1/4 second exposure". The standard shutter angle on the XTRprod is 180 degrees. Nothing in the manual about adjusting the shutter angle for still frame shooting, so I'm going to assume I don't have to.

 

I'm going to meter my lighting using the "4" setting on my spot meter (4 as in 1/4 sec, the meter displays 500 for 1/500 sec exposure so I'm guessing the 4 means 1/4 sec exposure).

 

So 1/4 sec exposure at 50 ISO *should work...

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