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darrin p nim

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About darrin p nim

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    Cinematographer
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    Los Angeles, Ca from Portland, Or

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    http://www.darrinpnim.com
  1. This. Most people will receive the lens in the left hand but it really is the discretion of the 1st as he/she may want to put the lens on with either hand. Thought, it's common for the left hand as most matte boxes swing to the dummy side and access is easiest from the smart/operator side. For me, mount with the left hand, lock with the right hand.
  2. Exactly, what I refer to as less out of focus may be attributed to the fact the the background will appear larger or smaller depending on the focal length/FOV. Making things more or less discernible. Because the bokeh of lens can't necessarily be quantifiable, only in relation to itself in focus compared to the size of the frame. Make sense? But even if the DOF is somewhat similar, numerically they show the DOF of a wider lens will always result in a background image/bokeh that appears to be more in focus even if it's only fractions of inches. :)
  3. While this looks to be true, this is misleading to what you are trying to answer. In regards to depth of field and how the bokeh effect would be resolved by going with a wider lens and maintain the same frame/composition. While you have proven that the DOF/area in focus may be about the same at the compensate distances whar you haven't proved is that the background/bokeh hasn't change. If the back ground is a flat plane at the same distance behind the actor/talent/object in focus the resulting image/bokeh would be less out of focus on the 25mm than the 50mm.
  4. Reluctantly, because I wasn't extremely descriptive in the language I used to discuss with them. Said conversations had taken place a couple years ago, I'm sure they wanted to get me off their backs. :D
  5. Walter you are right. I did fail to address the purposes and differences in using the two. Although, I did state my opinion, I failed to complete the statement with the information you provided. My original thoughts were so set on the screen itself that I forgot to recognize the importance of the subject in front of the screen and the other plentiful factors involved. But Walter, I had never stated "never", like you so previously quoted: "While one man expresses his desire to 'never' shoot blue, to tell folks that they should never is simply naive." I had stated that, "I had learned, that for digital/high definition material, to strongly avoid using blue screen." though i guess it depends on your interpretation of that statement. And I may be splitting hairs here but I had felt in my previous typing that "avoid" was not a definitive more so suggestive. I should be more careful when using such terms for fear of misconception. I don't believe Blue screen should be never be used. As mentioned, testing has shown blue can key out easier. I will admit that the choice is situational and everything should be taken into consideration. Honestly, if I do come off naive, it is not purposeful. I'm still learning with the rest of us. I did, however, unfortunately put myself in a situation where I felt I had the quality resources to make a proper assertion. I apologize for misinforming or shortly informing anyone.
  6. I think Saul and I are a little confused by what Mr. Pearl said. I think for the most part, we three, You, Saul and I agree that it helps to supplement the screen with additional color. Though Walter, as far as saying "to say as a generality that one should never use blue is nieve." is a little presumptuous. From my readings, namely the article in American Cinematographer with Cinematographer Eric Adkins, studies and accounts from more skilled 600 Cinematographers and mentors, I have come to my personal understanding that Green is a far more efficient key. Green is carried in the Luminance channel "Y" and for most digital/high definition cameras the Luminance channel carries the most information. Rendering it, in my opinion, better for keying but then again I'm no VFX artist. Just from my experience, the VFX artists that I've had a chance to ask (which are only a couple) have reluctantly said Green is preferred with digital media. So that's beyond my naivety, if that were the case. As for Iga, I don't believe it would be in your best interest to speak to production about renting a F950 and SR Deck. As like you said would be a financial issue. I would suggest, if at all possible, to request a Green screen. It would be a more affordable and logical replacement. Just my opinion.
  7. I apologize in advance if this is not what your are requesting but lens diopters will help increase close focus for your K3 zoom lens. Partially discussed in: http://www.cinematography.com/forum2004/in...showtopic=33034
  8. You mean using daylight (blue) balanced or CTB-gelled tungsten (resulting in greenish hue) lights for chroma key green screen with the camera set to 5600K or daylight balanced film? I have never had any problems doing it that way, I may have been lucky. I too am a little confused by this comment. Daniel, are you also referring to NOT using Kino Flo's Greenscreen and Bluescreen globes, in the sense that they would match and enhance with the corresponding screen? I had learned, that for digital/high definition material, to strongly avoid using blue screen. Especially with a 3:1:1 color space/sampling, which I believe the F900R has. I believe this was proven with the film, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, which was shot on the F900. Blue is the noisiest channel in digital/high definition. Now if you went with the F950 to an HDCAM SR Deck I believe you'll give your self 4:4:4 color space/sampling but if that's even possible. :)
  9. Thanks Chris. I knew your were some where on here. I don't post a lot, I tend to read more, so that's probably why you haven't seen me around. You know, I wanted to call some people from LA out but it would have been such a hassle to make it out for free. Gas compensation was non-existent. So I had to rely on a student crew to work for me, which was fine, they were very hard working when they decided to show up. This shoot was a mess, I doubt you would of had much fun. I really can't put together a great synopsis because the film is more of a "slice of life". The film is about an artistic young man named Noah who takes care of his grandmother, Mima, while attending college and working. He grows tired and forgetful of her needs but always seems to passively accomplish them. He gets fired from the restaurant he works at but is given a job opportunity from the guest he last serves, Ted. Ted show's his interest in Noah. Noah re-examines his financial situation and one day call's Ted. Ted meet's with him at night and picks him up in his car. Ted explains to Noah the job opportunity is similar to escorting and Noah reluctantly listens. Things escalate further than Noah predicted and he finds himself in a bind. Ted beats Noah up and rapes him whilst unconscious. He is thrown out from the car and left to find his way home. There, he scrubs himself clean in the shower where he begins to soak in his misery (hah literally). He then finds his way to his grandma where he realizes he needs her more than she does him. End of horrible synopsis. It is a dark themed film, the thick of the drama being in the car dealt with the rape scene, which was very intense and chilling. I've never even worked on a set that touched this subject and have only seen so many in films that have. So it was a little adventurous for me. The House location was very simply lit nothing extravagant compared to the Restaurant, which needed to exude higher class. The rape scene took place on a rural road which I felt had to have no real motivated sources, no street lamps, nothing. Just a car in the middle of a empty rural road. I wanted to light the wide exteriors with BFLs on a Condor but production cut that. So I went with a little different of a route. Much of that interior was soft light and darkness. I wanted to contrast this scene with the previous car scene (shown in frames 5 & 6) which occurs right before in a parking lot. The above stills are only some from the film, and were more for production than to show my work. Noah seen in frames 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, & 10 Mima/Noah's Grandma seen in frame 4 Ted seen in frames 5, 8, & 9 Jonathan/Noah's Boss seen in frame 7 Frame 1: Noah in his bedroom painting. Frame 2: Gets ready for an interview in his bathroom (frame is an awkward frame, facially.) Frame 3: Noah putting together a list of business to call. Frame 4: Last shot of the film, camera is sliding left to right, Noah enters from left of frame and Mima invites him to a loving hug. Frame 5: Ted arrives at the parking lot and picks Noah up. Frame 6: Noah waits for Ted in his car. Frame 7: Jonathan smells cigarettes and warns Noah. Frame 8: Ted begins to get serious in the the car, Noah becomes worried. Frame 9: Ted explains the opportunity. Frame 10: Noah just got fired, Ted speaks of a job opportunity. No questions? Comments? The EX1 and P&S worked finicky with each other. The focus ring on the EX1 had to be continually be checked and realigned, as the focus length display would show what looked to be right but often wasn't. Ughh. At times I was looking at my 1st AC with a puzzled look, she's very talented and she gave me grief when I had. Lol. Umm. I don't feel like typing much more. End of rant.
  10. Thanks Chris. I knew your were some where on here. I don't post a lot, I tend to read more, so that's probably why you haven't seen me around. You know, I wanted to call some people from LA out but it would have been such a hassle to make it out for free. Gas compensation was non-existent. So I had to rely on a student crew to work for me, which was fine, they were very hard working when they decided to show up. This shoot was a mess, I doubt you would of had much fun. I really can't put together a great synopsis because the film is more of a "slice of life". The film is about an artistic young man named Noah who takes care of his grandmother, Mima, while attending college and working. He grows tired and forgetful of her needs but always seems to passively accomplish them. He gets fired from the restaurant he works at but is given a job opportunity from the guest he last serves, Ted. Ted show's his interest in Noah. Noah re-examines his financial situation and one day call's Ted. Ted meet's with him at night and picks him up in his car. Ted explains to Noah the job opportunity is similar to escorting and Noah reluctantly listens. Things escalate further than Noah predicted and he finds himself in a bind. Ted beats Noah up and rapes him whilst unconscious. He is thrown out from the car and left to find his way home. There, he scrubs himself clean in the shower where he begins to soak in his misery (hah literally). He then finds his way to his grandma where he realizes he needs her more than she does him. End of horrible synopsis. It is a dark themed film, the thick of the drama being in the car dealt with the rape scene, which was very intense and chilling. I've never even worked on a set that touched this subject and have only seen so many in films that have. So it was a little adventurous for me. The House location was very simply lit nothing extravagant compared to the Restaurant, which need to exude higher class. The rape scene took place on a rural road and I felt had to have no real motivated sources, no street lamps, nothing. Just a car in the middle of a empty rural road, much of that scene was soft light and darkness. I wanted to contrast this scene with the previous car scene (shown in frames 5 & 6) which occurs right before in a parking lot. The above stills are only some from the film, and were more for production than to show my work. Noah seen in frames 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, & 10 Mima/Noah's Grandma seen in frame 4 Ted seen in frames 5, 8, & 9 Jonathan/Noah's Boss seen in frame 7 Frame 1: Noah in his bedroom painting. Frame 2: Gets ready for an interview in his bathroom (frame is an awkward frame, facially.) Frame 3: Noah putting together a list of business to call. Frame 4: Last shot of the film, camera is sliding left to right, Noah enters from left of frame and Mima invites him to a loving hug. Frame 5: Ted arrives at the parking lot and picks Noah up. Frame 6: Noah waits for Ted in his car. Frame 7: Jonathan smells cigarettes and warns Noah. Frame 8: Ted begins to get serious in the the car, Noah becomes worried. Frame 9: Ted explains the opportunity. Frame 10: Noah just got fired, Ted speaks of a job opportunity. No questions? Comments? The EX1 and P&S worked finicky with each other. The focus ring on the EX1 had to be continually be checked and realigned, as the focus length display would show what looked to be right but often wasn't. Ughh. At times I was looking at my 1st AC with a puzzled look, she's very talented and she gave me grief when I had. Lol. Umm. I don't feel like typing much more. End of rant.
  11. Hello fellow members, I don't usually do these and I probably won't go well into detail about the project but I just recently shot a short for a graduating Director friend of mine, Daniel Ross Noble. I was thinking of doing a "live" journal on here of the shoot but it was very tiring and falling apart at points. It was becoming difficult to salvage the film. Pick ups are mostly likely in order. On top of that my brother and cousin were/are in town, so I had to juggle them. I think they enjoyed being on set. Also this film was shot entirely in Ventura and some nights I drove back to Los Angeles in order to sleep at my apartment and returned the following day. Tiring. Well, to shed some light, I am a graduate of Brooks Institute, I have been out for a year. I have rarely shot much since graduation. I've been studying and learning every day I'm on set and off. I've lately been extremely eager to shoot and this opportunity came around. I've have been some what lucky to have worked enough the last couple of months to take some time off of for this shoot, as I have been very very eager to shoot. *Synopsis coming soon* This shoot was a student shoot as far as everyone but myself, even though many would still consider me on that level hadn't they known me. Shot in 4 days, 1 day, 1 day to night, and 2 night shoots. So this was difficult to work under such limitations. My gaffer was a good friend of mine that is graduating in less than a week, Mike Viera III, who played also as my key. I appreciate his hard work and his crew, as they and myself worked for free. I did however felt I had to micro-manage a little, as Mike has only worked as my Gaffer once before on a music video over a year ago. The actors were great aside from one who production found difficult to work with, even though he was very talented. Here are some stills from the shoot that are slightly timed in Photoshop by myself. This film was shot on the Sony EX1 with the P&S Technik and Zeiss Superspeeds. I originally did not want to go with the Superspeeds, I wanted to go with the Standard speeds as the glass is a little better and they are cheaper to rent. This film was very low budget. I ended up cutting out a hand full of rentals that would have made production much more easy, a Condor for a night exterior scene, and some other things. I ended up purchasing some rentals and some expendables in order to make this shoot work. Money that I most likely won't get back from production. We'll I honestly don't know much else to say so if you have any questions please feel free to ask. Enjoy.
  12. I also worry about this, not because I feel threatened but more because of the mentality that will come attached to it. I'm personally "bugged" by RED, having developed two new cameras when the RED One hasn't been close to being perfected.
  13. darrin p nim

    "Calibre"

    Well, I've been researching and can't seem to find any information proving anything other than EI 800 but I have given in and am shooting with the Superspeeds. Ughh... I'm just not a fan of the Superspeeds. I just have a gut feeling that with my gamma and matrix settings, I'll be rating the camera at EI 500 before attachments; putting me closer to EI 200 (according to P&S Techniks website listing a 1.2 stop loss of light). And Ideally, I'd like to shoot at a T2 maybe T2/2.8 but I don't feel confident enough to stick with the Standards. What were you're gamma settings for the camera on this shoot? Did you notice a change in sensitivity when shooting 720P versus 1080P? I heard that 720P is a 1/2-1 stop(?) more sensitive than 1080P. I've yet to test this.
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