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Tyler Leisher

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About Tyler Leisher

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  • Occupation
    Director
  • Location
    El Segundo, CA

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  • Website URL
    http://www.TylerLeisher.com
  1. I do have a HDTV, 16:9... I'd hate to see how it looked on a 4:3 cropped TV, the people wouldn't even be on the screen. I'll try to take a screenshot or photo of it to show what I'm talking about though. Additionally I should mention, I'm talking about the new show on NBC.
  2. Hey all, I was watching the show Prime Suspect, and something that they seem to LOVE to do is to do an over the shoulder shot but frame the subject in focus 1/4 to 1/2 out of the frame.. cutting them in half, essentially. I assume since this is a network TV show that it isn't just sloppy cinematography, it must be a choice to get a certain effect. Is there any specific type of emotion or effect that framing a shot like this is supposed to elicit?
  3. When you move a file away from where Avid knows, it won't be able to find it anymore so you have to reconnect the media. To do this: Select the graphic in the bin. Go to the Batch import from a "Clip" drop down menu. DO NOT select offline only. Select the file in the options box Choose select file location and browse to the correct media file.
  4. I'll be honest that I'm too young to know what Avid Cinema is/was. I'm thinking it was the old version of Avid Media Composer. Either way, the four that you should be checking out are: Avid Media Composer, the 5th version just came out and you can get a software only version for like $2,500. Check Avid.com Final Cut Pro, Final Cut Studio is like $1,000 but you can get just Final Cut Xpress for like $300 I think. Check Apple.com Adobe Premiere Pro. Now its like billionth version (It's in Creative Suite 5, which started after like version 9), Premiere Pro used to be looked down on but with CS5 it's picking up traction and might be of interest to you. Sony Vegas Video. Vegas isn't awful, but it's not great either. I haven't looked into the price of Vegas, but it might be worth looking into. Mac Based: Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro Windows Based: Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro, Sony Vegas Video
  5. Hey all, I am working on (slowly) building a home based edit suite, mostly for offline work or web based content. Was hoping to get some advice on the next piece of hardware I should buy. Right now, I have the following: + Macbook Pro 17" 2.66GHz i7 + Samsung 22" Monitor (with adapter to plug into Macbook) + G-Tech G-Raid 1 TB Drive + Wacom Pen Tablet + Awful Speakers (Got them for free, probably cost $30-50 at best buy) + Sennheiser 280 HD headphones + Contour Shuttle Pro + External Dock Encloser, for duplicating drives to give to clients Right now I've been mostly doing stuff on the mac then backing up to the G-Tech drive for archive. But I'm looking to up my work load away from purely web based stuff and more towards the indie film market, or the higher end web market. Most of the stuff I cut nowadays is either done on the HVX200 or DSLR like the 5D or t2i. It might be a pipe dream, but I'd like to be able to offer offline RED editing. I'm looking to spend about $600-700 on new equipment this month, and this is what I'm looking into but I'm not sure which is more important. Eventually I am going to upgrade to a Mac Pro, but for the time being I want to continue working off my MBP. Potential New Items: - RAID System, CalDigit VR or similar RAID system - Audio Mixer (Behhringer Xenyx 1202FX - Audio Monitors / Speakers (KRK Rockit 5s) - Apple Magic Mouse - Power Backup System - Additional Monitor/TV for use as a viewing TV or client monitor (something like a 32" TV with colors calibrated more appropriately) That is about all I can think of that I might need at this time, the Mac Pro is coming down the pipe in around a year with a Kona card, sound card, etc. I also plan on buying some Tape Decks and Card Readers, but that is also way down the line. I'm mainly looking for what should be my next upgrade to my baby suite.
  6. I was planning on buying the Rebel T2i at the end of September/beginning of October, but a friend of mine said that Canon might be releasing a new HDSLR in the near future and that might drive down the price of the T2i. What are your thoughts, should I buy it now for $900 or wait and see if the price drops?
  7. Do you do an md5 of each video file or an md5 of the entire folder?
  8. I thought they did this with mannequins and then added in the hanging stuff and breaking glass and wire removals later. This was actually made to loop on the new Phillips 21:9 TV that has environmental illumination. It wasn't meant as a short film for the sake of being a short, but more of a technical demonstration for the TV.
  9. Hey all, I'm working on learning to be a Digital Loader/2nd AC, and for my current job I ingest a lot of HD footage from P2 Cards and 5D/7Ds. Up until now, I've just been checking the directory file size and number of files copied but I dont think thats the most efficient (or real) way of checking. So, I'm curious if there are any standard industry proven ways of checking these to make sure: - The video from the P2 was transfered to the hard drive without problems (Checksums dont match of .mxf vs .mov when ingested.) - FIles have been copied from one drive to another I know that MD5 Checksumes are normally the standard, but I'm not sure how to go about getting a checksum of an entire folder (including subfolders) on a mac. Should I do a checksum of each file and then compare to the same file? Is there a faster way of generating multiple checksums? I'm also curious what you guys use to backup in the field in terms of an array, are you using a Drobo or G-Raid type RAID system, or do you have a custom built machine to handle that? Any other tips or advice you have for me would be great as well.
  10. Hello all, I'm looking for a bit of career advice from you guys, hopefully you can help me out. ABOUT ME: My dream job is to one day direct adventure/fantasy features. I know that the best way to get into the directing field is to direct spec commercials, music videos, etc.. but at the moment none of that pays the bills and I've got new wife that I need to provide for. I'm young enough so that I can make a career change without a lot of hassle (That is, no kids, no major mortgages, etc). For the past five years I've been doing PA work, Coordinating work and AD work. Most of which has opened my eyes more than anything and shown me that I don't want to be doing the logistics of filmmaking, I'd rather be able to be creative in my work. I've done some searching, and gotten my potential careers down to these three: Cinematography, Editing, Production Design. I feel capable of learning any of the technical and other necessities of each field, and I feel artist enough to work in any. I've been working with computers since I was 8, my parents were both designers and I've been interested in cameras and lighting for five years. The Real Question With all that being said, is any of those jobs better to get into if I'd like to direct one day? I know that I won't have time to direct side projects, but if I can't direct I'd like to work in a job that leaves me the opportunity to one day, if I'm lucky, get the chance to direct and to best prepare me to do the job. Is it better to start as a DP to learn the lenses, cameras, movement, how the look effects the mood and how the camera can change the pace, etc? Better to start as an editor to find out what works in post production and what makes a story work in the edit, how pacing works, etc? Or is it better to start as a designer, and get myself thinking creatively and artistically and have a broader sense of the overall look of a film? Thanks for the advice and the help, I really appreciate it and I'm glad to have a place like this where I can get real help from people in the industry.
  11. It'll never happen for films.. games maybe, but not films. If you give someone the ability to look around in any direction you take away the cinematic quality of it... the director, Editor and cinematographer craft the image on the screen, they decide the angle, which shot you see when and that builds the drama, it makes jokes more funny, it makes horrors more scary. How scary would Psycho, be if you could see on the other side of the shower curtain before Hitchcock wanted the reveal? How scary would something be if you were waiting to see the killer jump out, but instead of waiting and there being any suspense, you just saw the killer slowly walk up behind him?
  12. Just curious what you all think of this... will the Stereographer and Cinematographer always be different jobs? I haven't done much work in 3D, but I keep hearing the word and how important Stereographers are becoming. Is it something that on the day, the Stereographer is going to be handling something else while the cinematographer is handling the lighting and setups? Or do you think any good Cinematographer is going to have to learn about stereography
  13. Hm, the role of the DIT sounds really interesting. Something that's definitely up my alley. I do have one question though, traditionally the 2nd / Loader role was the way in, the foot in the door, etc. Is that the same way with the DIT? From the sound of it, the DIT is more like above or on par with the 1st AC in terms of set heirarchy. Should I start to learn more about the job and try to get in as a DIT/Data Manager or try to find some set to 2nd on (or both)?
  14. So I'm reading books on film camera crews and the various team members and what they do, but with the rise of digital production I'm curious if those positions have changed. For example, the 2nd/Loader, do they still have a purpose or are they more data managers now? I've heard talk about a position called DIT, but haven't heard much about it. If someone could be so kind as to break down what the crew members for the camera department do on a digital film, I'd appreciate it.
  15. Another great book: The Complete Film Production Handbook In fact, in that book they have a specific area for "Pre Production Checklist," It's a UPMs dream book.
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