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Found 10 results

  1. Good evening from Spain! I have a shooting in two weeks where they want a rear projection, it's an exterior day and we have a 6500 lumens projector and a 300x225 cm retroprojectable screen. Will I need more lumen output in the projector in order to have my image sharp? I've done this before but not in shootings, just in live events, where the projection quality is not mandatory to be clean and sharp. I will pack some additional large black cloth to try blocking sun going through the screen, but I'd appreciate some more tricks! Thanks a lot and happy new year!
  2. Hi everyone, thanks for looking through and the advice ahead of time. I have a shoot fast approaching and I'm debating the best way to light my exterior scene for an upcoming commercial. We will begin shooting early morning and we will see a family enter an amusement park from one angle where the sun is backlighting them - and then we will need to reverse the camera to see their POV. It will be a very sunny day I'm sure with no clouds so we should get some nice backlight. I'm debating however whether to front lit with a large ultra bounce (20x20 or 12x12) using the sun to light the family of 4 as they walk in (Wide - Full shot of family - then MID CU of each member). OR if I should also blast some M40s/M90's into the ultra bounce OR light them using 2 of these lights with diffusion frames or softboxes over them. The location has access to 63 amp power so we could run cables to take this power. I want a high key commercial look but want to go down the wisest route here. I have attached a sketch (actual location) in order to get a better idea.... I also plan to use a Job at the back of the family at the end of the street for an establishing shot... Also after I get this I will have to move the camera around facing a street of performers so they will all be front lit by the sun. I could film this first in order to get a more pleasant look with the sun being lower (Maybe use the Frames with Diffusion in case of any camera shadow if need be) and then film the family. Reference Picture attached... Any thoughts you may have on this or experience with similar setups would be super. Cheers all!
  3. Hello Everyone, My name is Vicken Joulfayan, and I am a new member here! I am a graduate student at the New York Film Academy in the Masters in Filmmaking program but my focus is primarily on cinematography. I am the DP for seven master thesis film projects, two of which are scheduled to be shot in the next several weeks, and am in need of advice for lighting. Although I have researched a lot and have a general idea of how to light each project, I need your advice in deciding which exact equipment to rent. The projects have budgets but they are minimal. I've embedded links to the first two projects I am working on in June, and they include the location image and overheads. Project 1 : https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByO5kv_UG9-NQkxDekNQdHZRdkE/view?usp=sharing For the bedroom night scene, we are recreating rain outside the window ( the space is visible in the picture, which is almost 3 feet, and then there is 6 feet downhill grass. The light will be put there at the bottom of the slope). Project 2: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByO5kv_UG9-NSnd3eDdLbUNnRjg/view?usp=sharing I am trying to keep it as simple as possible when it comes to lighting this one if it is a possibility. For both projects during day and night scenes, all the locations have big windows. I was thinking of 1.2hmi? par? or maybe Led even? Example aputure lightstorm ls1s) and additional fill IF needed inside, and practicals. Would I need a bigger frame than a 4x4 if i have exterior shots ( backyard shots)? I want to be able to see inside( characters) well exposed yet also have the outside location exposed ( outside logically more but still clear) without having the need to light so much additional light inside (tosco scrim black). Would a small LED be effective to create eye-light? Also we get 10 tiffen filters of our choice, Iwas planning to get these after research: - IR ND 1.2 / 1.5 / 1.8 - ND.6 ND.9 soft grad - Black pro mist 1/8 1/4 1/2 - Soft fx 1/2 - 1 + there is this grant where i can chose 6 full rolls or equivalent from LeeFilters that i am applying for. What do you guys recommend as primary to have!? cto, and ctb i think would be sad to have full rolls of! My choices are: 1- OPAL 2-GRID CLOTH 1/4 .. 3- HIGHLIGHT 4- ND 5- + - green. ? Equipment: Red Scarlet Mysterium X, EF mount. Lens given from school : Rokinon I also have the option of renting (POSSIBLY ) either zeiss CP.2 ,Canon Cine primes or Leica R cine mod. Which do you advise?! I really appreciate any feedback! Thank you in advance! Best, Vicken Joulfayan (818)224-9124 Vicken@joulfayan.com
  4. Good day, For a low budget short I will have many day exterior scenes (in moving and parked car and on the street) where I initially thought using only scrims, reflectors and negative fill, because I was afraid adding light would slow us down too much. But we are in winter and being in the mountains the weather (and light) can change very dramaticaly in very little time so I thought that if I took only one single but very powerful artificial source it could not slow us down so much and would up the results noteably. I figure a 6 or 8K would fit every shot (as I can always bring down it's power, but I obviously cannot raise the light of a smaller source) and we would not have to rent more fixtures. (less fixtures, fewer people to physically manage the light, fewer generators, smaller truck, faster shooting) Let's suppose physical space is not a matter: if I need the light it "lower" I could simply move the source further away before it hits the 8x8 diffusion. But: Is there something I miss? Is this (less fixtures ... faster shooting) a "valid formula" without overly compromising the result? (We will shoot on SRIII, Super16, Vision3 200T) Thank you in advance for any advice or shared experiences!
  5. Hi Guys. I'm new here and relatively new to lighting for film. I'm hoping this forum will guide me and help me improve my lighting techniques. I'm shooting a small corporate on Saturday and there is one shot on which I would appreciate your suggestions. I have not had a chance to recce the location but have been sent this photo from the client. The scene must look like daytime, but unfortunately due to a tight schedule it is likely to be shot at dusk (best case) or in total darkness (worst case, hopefully not as I will then be battling exterior sodium street lighting too). As you can see the room is quite small. The key shot I'm concerned about will be a wide from slightly to the right of the photographed position (against the back wall). It will take in three people sat on the sofa looking at a photo album and must include the window. There is a vertical blind that can be drawn across the window and be either partially or fully closed, but obviously it must be sufficiently backlit to look like daylight outside. A relatively soft look is desired. There is no budget to hire in extra kit so this is what I have available to me to make the shot work: 2 x Arri 650w Fresnel 1 x Arri 300w Fresnel 2 x 55w (200w eq) Energy Saving Daylights w/China Balls 2 x Bicolor 1x1 Litepanels 1 x 1m lastolite style reflector Plenty of Gels & Diff Will be shooting on a Red Epic with Samyang cine lenses. I have had some thoughts on how I might go about lighting this but I'm seeking the wisdom of more experienced folk. I'd be interested to hear what different approaches you guys might take towards achieving a soft daylight effect under these circumstances. Thanks.
  6. Starting a feature this week and the director wants a very "yellow springtime" look to our lighting. Mostly the highlights. Attached is a photo and isn't the best because the female is blonde as is probably natural backlight but this is the the rough tone. So my question is: to get that warm almost sunset color without getting too red/orange, has anybody played with more yellow color correction on daylight lit scenes? So on our HMI's instead of adding CTS or CTO for a little end of day glow playing more with yellows. I've but aside (from LEE) 100 Spring Yellow 767 Oklahoma Yellow 101 Yellow 102 Light Amber 104 Deep Amber Has anybody played with these colors on bigger sources? (18kHMI / 6kHMI) I like the look of 100 Spring Yellow but am afraid will start to feel green when blasting with a big unit.
  7. Hello, I'm working as a gaffer for a student film this January. The story is a drama/thriller that follows a man who dies and becomes trapped in a sort of limbo state of being. It's dark. It's fantasy. Our budget is very modest, but I'm very interested in using half hampshire on the windows for all day interior scenes - I love the blur it gives. However, those scenes make up only 30% of the film and the rest is night interiors. I'm wondering, can hampshire be used on windows at night to any great effect? I've looked into using dirty water and a spray bottle, but I imagine it will lack what the hampshire will deliver. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks, Jesse
  8. Hey Everybody, I'm new to the forum, but I was hoping to get some advice from you guys here. I was asked to light a night for day scene for the web series that I have been gaffing on. This isn't the biggest of problems since it is an interior scene. I've lit this place before, and I've only had to deal with making small windows appear to have sunlight coming in. But in this shoot the main character has a conversation in front of 2 glass doors. It is in a garden level business with the glass doors opening onto a patio area in the front. To top it off, the scene is supposed to take place at dawn. I can think of a couple ways of lighting this, one being more ideal on a visual standpoint but I am not sure if I have the lighting power to pull it off. I'll start with that one. Idea 1. Have 1-2 lights aimed through the windows to give the character his rim light while aiming all other lights on the patio. This would hopefully allow the background to not be totally blown out and it would create a more interesting shot. My biggest concern here is that we will also be able to see the dark buildings across the street. This all depends on the camera angle, but obviously the DP is not going to want to shoot down on the subject to avoid this. Idea 2. Use diffusion on the doors and blast light through them to give them a blown out look. Obviously this will make for a less interesting shot and I don't want this episode to look like a pile of trash as it is Ep. 1 and everything else we've shot has been looking stellar. Idea 3. tell the producers to go **(obscenity removed)** themselves because shooting in the actual morning would look dope as hell and they need to stop being cheap **(obscenity removed)** bastards. Personally I like the third Idea, but the DP and I have essentially already tried this. Any thoughts? I have all tungsten lights. 2 1k's Lowel DP kit with 3x500 w 200w tweenie 2 500w broad lights and a few more random lights the rest of the crew might bring. Hopefully i can get my hands on a couple 1.2 HMI's before this shoot, but it's up in the air. I'd also take Ideas for gelling the lights to make it look more morning like. I believe a more orange look here is pretty common, but i'm open to experimental ideas. Also not sure if it matters for sake of dynamic range, but we will be shooting on the FS 700.
  9. Hello all, I have a bit of a dilemma with a scene I am shooting where the director would like the lighting to change from night to day in one shot. The shot is in a (small) kitchen on a mid of a man sleeping at a table. We have a 400w HMI, 2k blonde as well as an 800w fresnel and 2 650's. We don't see the window in this frame which does help out a little. I was thinking of simply blacking out the window and then slowly letting the light come through starting at the top and moving down so the daylight hits the top of the ceiling first and then spills down to fill the room, then re creating the night light from outside, inside with one of the smaller lights. Does this sound like the right idea for the given situation? We could alternatively shoot when it's dark outside and then fake the daylight. Any comments would be much appreciated. Thanks, Tom
  10. Hi everyone, Very soon I'll be shooting a western short in the desert, mostly with HMI's, ultra bounce, and unbleached mus. My question to everyone is, will the warm color of the sand lower the overall color temperature of my daylight. I know we conventionally rate "daylight" between 5200k & 5600k. Right now I'm a thinking that the HMI's will appear too cool for day exteriors. Maybe the smartest thing to do is work with 4x4 mirrors and simplify things? Also, I'm contemplating using kerosene lamps and small tungsten units on flicker boxes for interiors. If anyone has experience shooting in the desert, specifically westerns, I would love to hear how they created their looks.
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