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Found 10 results

  1. DDTJRAC I got a few old photo albums in the Archive. You find some interesting things in them. But you need space to store albums and some $. While they are not overly expensive, interesting ones can go for a few hundred dollars each. Here is a photo from one of the European photo albums. Yearbooks are another interesting area of collection. Since there are so many yearbooks, I tried to concentrate most of my yearbook collection scope to women's colleges. This idea came about as an offshoot of my collections on flappers and bobbysoxers. Many of the yearbooks have collage pages and I made a separate collection just of the yearbook collages. Smith College 1949 Bryn Mawr 1939 Bryn Mawr 1960 - sometimes the girls would do some pre-Photoshop trick photography. <><><><> Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Small Gauge Film Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Advertising Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. VHS Video Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Popular Culture Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Audio Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Social Documentary Photography
  2. Post cards are an interesting area of collection when it comes to documenting history. You see a lot of things that you never knew existed and are not easy to find photos of otherwise. Especially if you get RPPC. Back in the day people would have short runs of RPPC's printed and send them off to their family and friends. I've been working on scanning a collection of cards from Southern California beach areas going back to 1900. Here are some from 1911, the Ship Cafe in Venice, CA. <><><><> Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Small Gauge Film Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Advertising Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. VHS Video Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Popular Culture Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Audio Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Social Documentary Photography
  3. Photo: Solomon D. Butcher via L.O.C. Back in the day, if a gal didn't have a broom or it got worn out, she had to make one or have hubby make one or buy a new one in town. It was her job to keep the house clean and she had to do it with whatever tools she had. Once a tool becomes worn out it is not efficient to use, it wastes time and energy. Sometimes hubby was off trapping for months on end and a drive to town was a major undertaking only done a few times a year or less for those in the wilderness. It was up to her a lot of the time to make do with what she had at hand. So, when she got a new broom or apron it was a big deal, versus having to make one. And getting a newfangled stove was like hitting the jackpot, compared to cooking over the hot fireplace in the summer. A stove made it easier to bake bread rather than using a Dutch oven in the fireplace. (Dutch oven = cast iron pot with lid.) And she would have to bake bread almost daily. The rich families had 2 stoves. One for winter cooking indoors and one for outdoors summer cooking. They could even have a separate summer kitchen building. If not rich, the stove would be moved outdoors for summer cooking. That is where the phrase 'Pa stoved his back' came from. Pa would hurt his back moving the heavy cast iron stove outdoors. Before washing machines, I've read a woman could spend 6 hours with her hands in the wash water doing clothes by hand when it was wash day. So, it was a most welcome present getting a washing machine for a Christmas. Nowadays, the gals would be pissed if they got a broom or washing machine for a Christmas present...but not in the old days! We take a lot of things from granted now. When electric lights first started to replace gas lights, electric wall sockets were not widespread as yet. Maytag was one of the early washing machine makers. Thor was said to be the first commercial electric washer sold in the USA. You could even power some machines with a water motor. Ads from 1909 - 1917 Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Advertising Archive. <><><><> Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Small Gauge Film Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Advertising Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. VHS Video Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Popular Culture Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Audio Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Social Documentary Photography
  4. At The Foot Of The Flatiron 1903 LOC D. D. Teoli Jr. A. C. : D. D. Teoli Jr. A. C. : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive An interesting tidbit of history from 120 years ago in 1903. On a windy day, at the foot of the Flatiron building in NYC. The Flatiron Building was built 1-year earlier in 1902. Film via LOC with added music. <><><><> Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Archival Collection Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Small Gauge Film Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Advertising Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. VHS Video Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Popular Culture Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Audio Archive Daniel D. Teoli Jr. Social Documentary Photography
  5. Hello! Sorry if this isn't the right section of the forum for this type of question. I've been doing some reading on the history of motion picture cameras and something got me curious about the mechanics used in them. It seems some early film cameras used the geneva wheel mechanism for advancing the film for exposure. And a lot of projectors have used the same mechanism for decades more. But apparently it didn't took long for camera designers to move away from the geneva wheel to use pull down claws of various forms. I imagine there is some reason for that. First I assumed it could be that pull down claws are more precise or durable, but it seems that projectors kept being designed with geneva wheels through out the XX century. And I got the impression that projectors need the same precision and probably even more durability than cameras, as they might run for a lot more hours overall. Considering the the geneva drive appears to be a lot easier to design, manufacture, assemble and repair, does anyone has an idea on why that happened? The only reason I can imagine is noise, maybe the claw mechanisms are overall more silent. That would explain why the geneva drive on cameras was more common in the early days before sound for film was developed. Also, if anyone has any recomendation of any book or text regarding the history of development of the mechanics of film cameras I'd love to learn more about that!
  6. I decided to check out the history of film stocks and their different formats, and I realized that there are no actual full-frame movie stocks that were ever developed or used for cinema back in those days. Full-frame as we cinema people interpret it today, from what I understand, came from digital manufacturers making sensors based on the 135mm film stock dimensions made for Photography: -Which are ~35mm wide in its negative and ~24mm tall negative(which is approximately the actual width of negatives on Super35mm film stocks, so basically it's like someone rotated Super35mm stocks 90 degrees) -Pulled along horizontally rather than vertically, which is actually what allows the ~35mm width negative Unless I'm missing something, why was there no Full-Frame( not the full-gate 35mm but the actual negative 36 x 24) ever used? It was quite surprising to see that cinema film stock developers decided to just jump straight into Medium Format from Super35. The only thing that might come close to it is VistaVision, but I'm not 100% sure if that actually qualifies as full frame . Thanks
  7. I was reading the year 2000 edition of the Kodak cinematography field guide and among the essential supplies for a ditty bag it listed orange sticks, which I believe are thin, 4- or 5-inch long sticks used by manicurists. They have tapered ends. Is that what Kodak is talking about? If so, does anyone know how camera operators and cinematographers used them? Do they have any relevance today?
  8. Hi, I'm having a little research. Usually cinematographers or directors (ask) to use blue tone when lighting night scenes and moonlights effects. I believe it's a creative choice but some would make it their standard. Personally, I don't want to use blue in lighting night/moonlight scenes unless it is a creative decision. I'm discussing about this with some of my friends. I want a little help in finding out the background behind it. Where did the idea came from? Who and what film started it? Any links and information about this? Thanks.
  9. I just bought krasnogorsk-3 and while i'm waiting for it to arrive i started to search for some data about it. To be quick here are the two main questions that i can't find any reliable answer to: 1. When did the production of k3 start and when did it end (- i guess with the collaps of ussr)? 2. Are there any movies that were shot with k3 (- i'll have to wait for a week or two until it arrives from Russia to Croatia, so i would like to watch some movie filmed with k3)? Sorry if there's already a post that answers this questions, i went through a lot of posts about k3 but i couldn't find anything.
  10. Hi guys i was wondering if anybody out there could point me in the right direction in finding out about the history of Grips in the film industry ether a book or website or personal knowledge. As i need to find out for my final year university project about grips ( as i would like to pursue a career as a grip when i leave uni) and other crew members who are seen as lower down on the film making hierarchy but are vital to a film set. any help would be appreciated
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