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Found 21 results

  1. Panavision, the world-class provider of end-to-end solutions, will return to Cine Gear Expo (May 31-June 1) at The Studios at Paramount to showcase the latest innovations in the company’s ever-expanding production and post production ecosystem. Panavision, Light Iron and LEE Filters will display an array of integrated technologies and systems at booth S408 on Stage 3 – ranging from lenses, cameras and filters, to state-of-the-art production and post production workflows – that illustrate Panavision’s commitment to providing the most versatile and powerful storytelling tools. “At Panavision, our vision is to support filmmakers with solutions that expand creativity and efficiency,” says Kim Snyder, president and CEO of Panavision. “We’re always focused on adapting the tremendous power of technology to the needs of the visual artist. We’re proud and excited to demonstrate our latest advancements.” Among the breakthroughs on display are Panavision and Light Iron’s new LINK HDR system. Creatives are producing for HDR-capable distribution platforms more than ever before as consumers seek premium viewing experiences. LINK HDR was developed to address the challenge of viewing HDR (high dynamic range) images throughout the production and post production process. Offering HDR and SDR viewing options in tandem, LINK HDR provides cinematographers, directors, editors and creative talent throughout the imaging chain the ability to view their image at the same quality delivered to consumers. The LINK HDR system consists of: Panavision LINK HDR On-Set Cart – a modular cart outfitted with various monitoring configurations that offers creatives the ability to view HDR and SDR live from the camera. Light Iron LINK HDR Dailies – an NLE process that creates HDR and SDR deliverables simultaneously, which allows editors to cut, toggle between, and export in either format. Light Iron LINK HDR Finish – a combination of creative talent, technical expertise, and leading technologies that link the creative decisions made on-set to the HDR mastering process for delivery to various HDR platforms. “As adoption rates of the HDR format rapidly grow, it is more critical than ever for creatives to view a consistent image from on-set through the finishing suite,” notes Light Iron Supervising Colorist Ian Vertovec. “We want filmmakers to have all the tools they need for this new deliverable. The components of LINK HDR were designed with them in mind.” Panavision’s Millennium DXL2 and DXL-M camera systems will also be showcased at the Panavision booth, demonstrating the value of this expanding ecosystem. With new industry developments, the DXL2’s 6G 4K SDI outputs, which allow direct connection to a Teradek Bolt 4K with a single SDI cable, can now be fully utilized. The latest enhancements to the DXL2 also include: an integrated C-Motion F.I.Z. module allowing the use of Arri WCU4 wireless lens control handsets with full lens mapping support; a proxy workflow that allows easy creation of traditional dailies while archiving 8K files for DI and VFX; a wireless audio module adding expanded audio capabilities; and DXL Control for iPhone and Android. The DXL-M, which marries the modularity and connectivity of the DXL with the smaller size and weight of RED’s DSMC2 cameras, is now available to filmmakers. In addition to the Primo HDR viewfinder, DXL menu system and LiColor2, the DXL-M now offers 2x2 SDI outputs delivering two independent monitoring paths across 4x HD-SDI outputs. Along with added accessories, battery elevator and control upgrades, these advancements add to the efficiency and flexibility of the kit. The result is a fully-equipped camera that is conveniently adaptable to any shooting scenario, including drone, remote head shots and situations where space is at a premium. Panavision’s LCND, a variable liquid crystal neutral density filtration system, will be presented with expanded new features. LCND is now wirelessly controllable via the Preston handset and offers functionality that translates to creativity on the set. The ability to maintain a given stop under changing lighting conditions by riding the ND filter instead of the iris adds powerful image control options at the moment of photography. LCND also has manual controls and a 24-hour internal battery built into the single filter tray. Panavision’s longstanding emphasis on delivering superior lens quality and unmatched selection continues to be a priority as it serves the artistic needs of today’s creative community. At Cine Gear, filmmakers can examine the company’s proprietary portfolio of optics, including the Primo-X (weatherproof and compact drone and gimbal solution), Panaspeed (large format, high-speed T1.4 with the classic Primo look), H-Series (vintage portrait look for spherical large format), and UltraVista (1.65x large-format anamorphic) lines, as well as other lenses in Panavision’s large-format offerings. In addition to exhibiting, Panavision, in partnership with RED Digital Cinema, will present a panel featuring Oscar®-nominated cinematographer John Schwartzman, ASC. Panavision’s SVP of Optics Dan Sasaki will join Schwartzman as he discusses his approach to visual storytelling and explores the fusion between visual concepts and tools. Schwartzman will reveal his decision-making process from pre-production to post on such projects as The Highwaymen and the upcoming Last Christmas, on June 1 at 11:45 a.m. in the Sherry Lansing Theater. LEE Filters will highlight the LEE100, a newly updated 100mm filter mount system that boasts lighter weight and improved performance. The LEE100 Filter System incorporates a rotation lock as well as a newly designed clip-on polarizer filter for ease of use. Additionally, LEE’s full collection of lighting gels, including the expanded range of Zircon gels specifically designed for fine-tuning LED fixtures, will be touted, as well as the ProGlass CINE IRND range of neutral-density filters, precisely built to meet the exacting needs of cinematographers. “The advancements on display at Cine Gear exemplify our commitment to providing end-to-end solutions that put creative flexibility in the hands of filmmakers,” says Snyder. “Each tool is conceived as an element of a unified ecosystem designed to deliver customizable solutions to meet any need or budget. We’re looking forward to the opportunity to present the results to our friends and colleagues in the filmmaking community, and we can’t wait to see how they’re used in the visual storytelling of tomorrow.”
  2. Light Iron, a Panavision company specializing in post production services, is again playing an important collaborative role with notable episodic series this season. Customized workflow offerings from Light Iron for BETTER THINGS, THE GOOD FIGHT, THE OA, RAMY, SHRILL, THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL, and WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS, included dailies, digital intermediate, archive, and data services, among other creative and technical contributions. From San Francisco and Los Angeles to New York and Toronto, Light Iron serviced the productions from a range of locations with color and front-end teams involved from pre-production for a smooth and efficient experience. “We are honored to support these outstanding projects,” says Peter Cioni, Light Iron’s General Manager. “Our unique understanding of the demands of episodic schedules coupled with our technical skills in file-based workflows fuels our ability to fulfill the creative vision on time and on budget. Light Iron at its core is focused on innovation and, as part of the Panavision family, we offer our expertise from pre-production through finishing, creating efficiencies throughout the imaging chain.” A closer look at the projects demonstrates the possibilities for end-to-end solutions from Light Iron and Panavision: • BETTER THINGS, season 3 (FX) – Already renewed for a fourth season, BETTER THINGS follows the trials and tribulations of Sam Fox (Pamela Adlon), a single mother and working actor with no filter, raising her three daughters in Los Angeles. The season was shot by Paul Koestner who collaborated with Light Iron’s dailies colorist Gregory Pastore and DI colorist Corinne Bogdanowicz. Panavision Hollywood provided the camera and lens package. • THE GOOD FIGHT, season 3 (CBS All Access) – Entertainment Weekly hails the third installment of THE GOOD FIGHT as “the best show on TV.” Shot by Fred Murphy, ASC, this season was supported by Light Iron with dailies by Andrew Hodgdon and final color from Steven Bodner. The production is also serviced by Panavision New York. • THE OA, season 2 (Netflix) – The first season of THE OA quickly developed a cult fan base. For the highly anticipated second installment, Light Iron worked closely with series DPs Steven Meizler and Magnus Nordenhof Jønck to ensure the work done by dailies colorists Andrew Hodgdon and George Thomas was reflected in the final color grade with Ian Vertovec. Services included location support in San Francisco and Los Angeles. • RAMY, season 1 (Hulu) – Winner of the 2019 SXSW Audience Award, RAMY stars actor-director-comedian Ramy Youssef as the son of Egyptian immigrants in New Jersey. Light Iron worked closely with cinematographers Adrian Peng Correia and Ashley Connor to establish the look in dailies, which transferred seamlessly into the DI where the final color grade was performed by Steve Bodner. Cameras and optics were supplied by Panavision New York. • SHRILL, season 1 (Hulu) – From executive producers Lorne Michaels and Elizabeth Banks and showrunner Ali Rushfield, SHRILL stars Aidy Bryant (from SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE) as Annie, an overweight young woman who wants to change her life — but not her body. Based on the 2016 memoir by Lindy West, Vox calls the series “a quietly tender portrayal of learning how to love yourself.” Light Iron colorist Nick Lareau provided the final color grade in collaboration with cinematographer Joe Meade. • THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL, season 2 (Amazon) – Light Iron worked alongside cinematographers M. David Mullen, ASC and Eric Moynier, returning for the second season of this award-winning series created by Amy Sherman-Palladino. Light Iron’s Aaron Burns handled dailies color and Steve Bodner collaborated with the two DPs during finishing. For camera and lens options, Panavision New York was the go-to resource. • WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS, season 1 (FX) – Based on the feature film of the same name, WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS is a documentary-style look into the lives of four vampires who have “existed” together for hundreds of years on Staten Island. The film’s cinematographer D.J. Stipsen returned for the series, which has earned a 96% rating from Tomatometer critics on Rotten Tomatoes. Christian Sprenger lensed the pilot. Light Iron dailies colorists Gregory Pastore and Jacob Doforno supported early look development in Toronto via the local Panavision facility, which carried over into finishing in the DI by Ian Vertovec. For more information, visit www.lightiron.com.
  3. FotoKem, a leader in digital and film post production, announced today that industry veteran Dana Ross has joined the facility as Senior Vice President of Client Relations. With more than 40 years of experience, Ross will collaborate with FotoKem’s sales and marketing teams to continue to expand its growing creative connections. Ross brings a breadth of experience to this new engagement that encompasses motion picture workflow, production, camera and lens expertise, and decades of relationships with filmmakers. He began his career at CFI Motion Picture Laboratory, first as a projectionist and later as a color timer. After 23 years at CFI, he transitioned to Technicolor, serving as SVP of Feature Film Relations. In 2014, Ross joined the ARRI Rental team as a global marketing executive and embarked in the development and launch of the Alexa 65 camera system, which has become a leading tool for filmmakers and used on Academy Award®-winning films. Ross, an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC), also has a passion for still photography. In particular, he fosters a love for working in the 11x14 plate camera format. This passion, combined with many years working closely with directors of photography, has seen him take studio portraits of numerous cinematographers. Ross says, “FotoKem is renowned for its service, expertise, and numerous credits on highly respected projects. I am excited to join the team to help further inform the broader creative community of the company’s accomplishments and capabilities.” FotoKem Chief Strategy Officer Mike Brodersen adds, “Ross has been supporting filmmakers on projects of every size for many years in the industry. We’re thrilled to have him on board to communicate our offerings to a broader scope of filmmakers.”
  4. Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. (NASDAQ:SCAC) (“Saban Capital Acquisition Corp.”), a publicly traded special purpose acquisition company, Panavision Inc. ("Panavision"), and Sim Video International Inc. ("Sim") announced today that the companies have entered into a definitive business combination agreement to create a premier global provider of end-to-end production and post-production services to the entertainment industry. The combined company will be well positioned to capitalize on the continued growth of content production spending and enhance the scope of service offerings to its customers. Under the terms of the business combination agreement, Panavision and Sim will become wholly-owned subsidiaries of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. Immediately following the proposed transactions, Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. intends to change its name to Panavision Holdings Inc. (the “Company”) and is expected to continue to trade on the Nasdaq stock exchange. Headquartered in Woodland Hills, California, Panavision is an iconic designer, manufacturer and provider of high precision optics and camera technology for the entertainment industry and a leading global provider of production-critical equipment and services. Headquartered in Toronto, Canada, Sim is a leading provider of production and post-production solutions with facilities in Los Angeles, Vancouver, Atlanta, New York and Toronto. The transaction reflects a valuation for the combined entity of $622 million (inclusive of debt) or approximately 5.9x fiscal year 2018 estimated Adjusted EBITDA. The cash component of the purchase price to be paid to the equity holders of Panavision and Sim will be funded by Saban Capital Acquisition Corp.’s cash in trust, which is approximately $250 million, a $55 million private placement of common stock at $10.00 per share secured from a mix of premier institutional investors as well as an affiliate of Saban Sponsor LLC and newly raised debt financing. Upon the closing of the proposed transaction, Kim Snyder, President and Chief Executive Officer of Panavision will serve as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and Bill Roberts, Chief Financial Officer of Panavision, will serve in that role for the combined company. “We are excited to partner with Kim along with the Panavision and Sim teams to capitalize on the explosive growth in content spending,” commented Haim Saban, Chairman of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. He continued, “Advancements in technology and the emergence of streaming have fundamentally changed how consumers watch and discover content. This is driving significant growth in the market for production and post-production services. This secular trend creates a tremendous opportunity for Panavision to leverage its leading technology and pursue opportunistic acquisitions to grow in a manner that is agnostic to the content creator and distribution channel.” Adam Chesnoff, President and Chief Executive Officer of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp., commented, “This transaction creates a leading global platform ideally positioned to capitalize on the rapid growth in content production. The combination of these two companies will create the foremost provider of end-to-end production and post-production services. Combining this platform with Saban’s wide-ranging global media relationships, experience in production, and successful track record of creating value for its partners, will position the Company to accelerate growth and pursue complementary acquisitions. We are excited about the potential.” “For nearly 65 years, Panavision has proudly served the entertainment industry providing cutting-edge equipment and exemplary service to support the creative vision of our customers,” says Kim Snyder, Chairman and CEO of the combined company. “This acquisition will leverage the best of Panavision’s and Sim’s resources by providing comprehensive products and services to best address the ever-adapting needs of content creators globally. These complementary companies subscribe to the same strategic vision: to support our customers as the category-defining provider of end-to-end production and post-production services.” “Combining the talent and integrated services of Sim with two of the biggest names in the business, Panavision and Saban, will accelerate our strategic plan,” added James Haggarty, President and CEO of Sim. “The resulting scale of the new combined enterprise will better serve our clients and help shape the content-creation landscape,” continued Haggarty. The respective boards of directors of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp., Panavision and Sim have unanimously approved the proposed transactions. Completion of the proposed transactions are subject to Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. stockholder approval, certain regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions. The parties expect that the proposed transactions will be completed in the first quarter of 2019. For additional information on the proposed transaction, see Saban Capital Acquisition Corp.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, which will be filed promptly and can be obtained at the website of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) at www.sec.gov. Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. and Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC are serving as financial advisors, capital markets advisors and private placement agents and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Dentons Canada LLP are serving as legal advisors to Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. Houlihan Lokey, Inc. is serving as financial advisor, Citi is serving as Capital Markets Advisor, and Kirkland & Ellis, LLP and Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP are serving as legal advisors to Panavision. Marckenz Group Capital Advisors is serving as financial advisor and Stikeman Elliott LLP is serving as legal advisor to Sim.
  5. As entertainment industry luminaries prepare to swarm Park City for the Sundance Film Festival, Panavision and Light Iron (Panavision’s post production subsidiary) are proud to announce their collaborations with filmmakers on more than 25 projects screening or competing at the 2019 event (Jan. 24 – Feb. 3). The independent filmmakers behind these unique stories leveraged the innovative services of Panavision and Light Iron to provide a full range of offerings from gear to final deliverables. “We’re honored that independent artists join forces with us to achieve their vision,” says Kim Snyder, president and CEO, Panavision. “We are dedicated to delivering the tools and expertise that content creators need, wherever they are in the world, from pre-production to post.” The 2019 Sundance lineup illustrates Panavision’s enduring commitment to supporting the creative community and reinforces the importance of fostering filmmaking around the world. Across a number of titles, Panavision provided camera, lens and accessory packages, as well as dailies, offline editorial, and final color services from Light Iron. The comprehensive and single-point offerings underscore the company’s dedication to meeting the individual needs of independent filmmakers and their budget demands. Snyder adds, “Panavision’s vast portfolio of cameras and lenses coupled with our technical expertise present filmmakers with a phenomenal mix of options to creatively assemble the right equipment for any job. Additionally, the workflow savvy and creative services from Light Iron provide critical components that ensure quality imagery throughout the entire process.” Here’s a look at some of the highly anticipated productions at Sundance supported by Panavision and Light Iron: U.S. Dramatic Competition Big Time Adolescence (dir. Jason Orley, DP Andrew Huebscher) – Camera rental, Superspeed lenses, Panavision New York. Brittany Runs a Marathon (dir. Paul Downs Colaizzo, DP Seamus Tierney) – Camera rental, Primo prime lenses, Panavision New York. Color by Sean Dunckley, Light Iron New York. Hala (dir. Minhal Baig, DP Carolina Costa) – Camera and optics package, Panavision Chicago. Honey Boy (dir. Alma Har'el, DP Natasha Braier, ASC, ADF) – Camera and optics package, Panavision Hollywood. Luce (dir. Julius Onah, DP Larkin Seiple) – Panavision XL2 camera, G Series lenses, Panavision New York. To the Stars (dir. Martha Stephens, DP Andrew Reed) – Camera rental, Primo Prime lenses, Panavision Dallas. Premieres Animals (dir. Sophie Hyde, DP Bryan Mason) – Camera rental, Superspeed lenses, Panavision Ireland. Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile (dir. Joe Berlinger, DP Brandon Trost) – Camera rental, C Series anamorphic lenses, Panavision Hollywood. Late Night (dir. Nisha Ganatra, DP Matthew Clark) – Camera rental, Primo Zoom lenses, Panavision New York. Dailies by Light Iron New York. Color by Sean Dunckley, Light Iron New York. Paddleton (dir. Alex Lehmann, DP Nathan M. Miller) – Color by Corinne Bogdanowicz, Light Iron Los Angeles. Photograph (dir. Ritesh Batra, DP Ben Kutchins) – Offline editorial rentals, Light Iron New York. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind - Opening Night Film (dir. Chiwetel Ejiofor, DP Dick Pope, BSC) – Camera rental, Primo Prime lenses, Panavision Johannesburg. The Tomorrow Man (dir. and DP Noble Jones) – Color by Corinne Bogdanowicz, Light Iron Los Angeles. Top End Wedding (dir. Wayne Blair, DP Eric Murray Lui) – Camera and optics package, Panavision Sydney. Troop Zero - Closing Night Film (dir. Bert & Bertie, DP Jim Whitaker) – Dailies by Light Iron New Orleans. Color by Corinne Bogdanowicz, Light Iron Los Angeles. Velvet Buzzsaw (dir. Dan Gilroy, Robert Elswit, ASC) – Panavision Millennium DXL2, Standard Prime lenses, Panavision Woodland Hills. NEXT Competition Selah and the Spades (dir. Tayarisha Poe, DP Jomo Fray) – Camera and optics package, Panavision New York. Color by Steven Bodner, Light Iron New York. The Wolf Hour (dir. Alistair Banks Griffin, DP Khalid Mohtaseb) – Camera rental and T-series, MAP55, and AWZ2.3 lenses, Panavision New York. WORLD Cinema Dramatic Competition Judy and Punch (dir. Mirrah Foulkes, DP Stefan Duscio) – Camera rental, C Series lenses, Panavision Sydney. Midnight Corporate Animals (dir. Patrick Brice, DP Tarin Anderson) – Color by Nick Hasson, Light Iron Los Angeles. Little Monsters (dir. Abe Forsythe, DP Lachlan Milne, ACS) – Camera rental, anamorphic lenses, Panavision Sydney. Spotlight The Nightingale (dir. Jennifer Kent, DP Radek Ladczuk) – Camera rental, PVintage lenses, Panavision Sydney. Doc Premieres Ask Dr. Ruth (dir. Ryan White, DP David Jacobson) – Color by Nick Lareau. Light Iron Los Angeles. Indie Episodic It's Not About Jimmy Keene (Dir. Caleb Jaffe, DP Noble Gray) – Color by Ian Vertovec. Light Iron Los Angeles. Special Events Lorena (dir. Joshua Rofé, DP Ronan Killeen) – Dailies by Light Iron Los Angeles. Color by Nick Lareau, Light Iron Los Angeles. Now Apocalypse (dir. Gregg Araki, DP Sandra Valde-Hansen) – Camera rental, Primo Prime lenses, Panavision Hollywood. U.S. Narrative Shorts Lockdown (dir. Celine Held and Logan George, DP Caleb Heller) – Rental package, Panavision Woodland Hills.
  6. The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has announced the 2018 nominees for the HPA Awards creative categories. The Awards are considered the standard bearer for creative excellence and technical innovation in an industry embracing an expanding array of groundbreaking technologies and creativity, honoring achievement and artistic excellence by individuals and teams who bring stories to life and outstanding content to audiences around the world. Launched in 2006, the HPA Awards recognize outstanding achievement in editing, sound, visual effects and color grading for work in television, commercials, and feature films. The winners of the 13th Annual HPA Awards will be announced at a gala ceremony on 15 November 2018 at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, CA. Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film “Avengers: Infinity War” Steven J. Scott, Charles Bunnag // Technicolor – Hollywood “Red Sparrow" Dave Hussey // Company 3 “The Shape of Water” Chris Wallace // Deluxe – Toronto “Alpha” Maxine Gervais // Technicolor – Hollywood “The Greatest Showman” Tim Stipan // Company 3 Outstanding Color Grading – Television “Damnation – Sam Riley’s Body” Paul Allia // Picture Shop “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – Pilot” Steven Bodner // Light Iron “The Crown – Paterfamilias" Asa Shoul // Molinare “Game of Thrones – Beyond the Wall” Joe Finley // Sim “The Crossing – Pilot” Tony Smith // Picture Shop Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial Bottega Veneta – "Spring/Summer 2018 Trailer" Tim Masick // Company 3 Tile – "Lost Panda" Tom Poole // Company 3 Volkswagen – "Kids Dream" Adam Scott // The Mill Audi – "Final Breath" Sofie Borup // Company 3 Bottega Veneta – "Spring/Summer 2018 Main" Tim Masick // Company 3 Outstanding Editing – Feature Film Sponsored by Blackmagic Design “A Quiet Place” Christopher Tellefsen, ACE “Coco” Steve Bloom “You Were Never Really Here” Joe Bini “Mission: Impossible – Fallout” Eddie Hamilton, ACE “Believer” Demian Fenton Outstanding Editing – Television (30 Minutes and Under) Sponsored by Blackmagic Design “The End of the F***ing World – Episode One” Mike Jones “Vida – Episode 6” JoAnne Yarrow “VICE – After the Fall” Kelly Kendrick // Vice “Barry – Chapter Eight: Know Your Truth" Kyle Reiter “Vice Principals –The Union of the Wizard and The Warrior" Jeff Seibenick Outstanding Editing – Television (Over 30 Minutes) Sponsored by Blackmagic Design “Stranger Things – Chapter Nine: The Gate” Kevin D. Ross, ACE “The Defiant Ones – Part 2” Doug Pray, Lasse Järvi “Game of Thrones – The Dragon and the Wolf” Crispin Green “Westworld – The Passenger” Anna Hauger, Mako Kamitsuna, MPEG, Andrew Seklir, ACE “Counterpart – The Crossing" Dana E. Glauberman, ACE Outstanding Sound – Feature Film “Ant-Man and The Wasp” Katy Wood, Addison Teague, Juan Peralta, Tom Johnson // Skywalker Sound “The Shape of Water” Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern, Nelson Ferreira, Nathan Robitaille // Deluxe - Toronto “Avengers: Infinity War” Shannon Mills, Tom Johnson, Juan Peralta, Dan Laurie // Skywalker Sound “Blade Runner 2049” Mark Mangini, Ron Bartlett, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill, Mac Ruth // Formosa Group “Black Panther” Benjamin A. Burtt, Steve Boeddeker, Brandon Proctor // Skywalker Sound Outstanding Sound – Television “Yellowstone – Daybreak” Allan Murray, Tim LeBlanc, Dean Zupancic // Warner Bros “Waco – Operation Showtime” Craig Mann, Kelly Oxford, Laura Wiest, Karen Vassar Triest, David Brownlow, Beau Borders // Technicolor – Hollywood “Dark – Secret” Alexander Wurtz, Achim Hofmann, Jorg Elsner, Ansgar Frerich, Christian Bichoff // Basis Berlin “Yellowstone – Kill the Messenger” Allan Murray, Tim LeBlanc, Dean Zupancic // Warner Bros. “Altered Carbon – Out of The Past” Brett Hinton, Mark Allen, Owen Granich-Young, Andy King, Keith Rogers // Atomic Sound Outstanding Sound – Commercial OXFAM – “The Heist No One is Talking About” Neil Johnson // Factory Studios KIA – “Fueled by Youth" Nathan Dubin // Margarita Mix SANE – “Let Me Talk” Anthony Moore, Jack Hallett // Factory Studios Monster – “Opportunity Roars” Tom Jucarone // Sound Lounge ICRC – “Hope” Anthony Moore // Factory Studios Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film “Maze Runner: The Death Cure” R. Christopher White, Daniel Macarin, Philip Leonhardt, Paul Ramsden, Jeremy Fort // Weta Digital “Blade Runner 2049” Richard Clegg, Axel Akesson, Wesley Chandler, Stefano Carta, Ian Cooke-Grimes // MPC “Rampage” Erik Winquist, Benjamin Pickering, Stephen Unterfranz, Thrain Shadbolt, David Clayton // Weta Digital “Thor: Ragnarok” Kyle McCulloch, Alexis Wajsbrot, Ben Loch, Harry Bardak // Framestore “Avengers: Infinity War” Matt Aitken, David Conley, Charles Tait, Paul Story, Marvyn Young // Weta Digital Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (Under 13 Episodes) “Altered Carbon – Out of The Past” Everett Burrell, Tony Meagher, Steve Moncur, Christine Lemon, Paul Jones // DNEG “Outlander – Eye of The Storm" Richard Briscoe // Outlander Production Daniel Norlund, Filip Orrby // Goodbye Kansas Aladino Debert, Greg Teegarden // Digital Domain “Black Mirror – Metalhead" Russel McLean, Michael Bell, Pete Levy, Steven Godfrey, Stafford Lawrence // DNEG “Game of Thrones – Beyond The Wall” Joe Bauer, Steve Kullback, Ted Rae, Eric Carney // HBO David Ramos // El Ranchito “Westworld – The Passenger” Jay Worth, Bruce Branit // Deep Water FX Bobo Skipper // Important Looking Pirates Kama Moiha // COSA VFX Mike Enriquez // DNEG Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (Over 13 Episodes) “Supergirl – For Good” Armen V. Kevorkian, Gevork Babityan, Kris Cabrera, Jerry Chalupnik, Jason Shulman // Encore VFX “Agents of SHIELD – Orientation: Part 1” Mark Kolpack, Sabrina Arnold // Marvel Kevin Yuille, David Ray, Hnedel Maximore // FuseFX “Hawaii Five-O – A’ole e ‘olelo mai ana ke ahi ua ana ia” Adam Avitabile, Daniel Toomey, Michael Kirylo, Ryan Smolarek, Wayne Hollingsworth // Picture Shop “Legends of Tomorrow – The Good, The Bad and The Cuddly” Armen V. Kevorkian, Andranik Taranyan, Jason Shulman, Dan Aprea, Lycee Anaya // Encore VFX “NCIS: LA – A Line in the Sand/Ninguna Salida" Dylan Chudzynski, Michael Carter, Joe Suzuki, Jacob Kuhne // DigitalFilm Tree As previously announced, Victoria Alonso has been named the recipient of the Charles S. Swartz Award. Alonso is a respected producer and is Executive Vice President, Production for Marvel Studios. The winners of the coveted Engineering Excellence Award, Blackmagic Design (DaVinci Resolve 15), Canon (Visual and Technical Monitoring of HDR Images), Cinnafilm, Inc. (PixelStrings), and IBM Aspera & Telestream (Telestream Vantage with Lightspeed Live Capture powered by Aspera), were announced earlier this year. All awards will be bestowed at the HPA Awards gala. The HPA Awards gala ceremony is expected to be a sold-out affair and early ticket purchase is encouraged. Tickets for the HPA Awards are on sale now, online at www.hpaawards.net or by calling +1 (818) 273-1482. More information about the HPA Awards and the Hollywood Professional Association can be found at www.hpaonline.com or by calling the HPA at +1 (818) 273-1482. The HPA Awards take place with the support of diamond title sponsor Blackmagic Design, platinum sponsor IMAX, bronze sponsors Avid and Sony Pictures Post Production Services, supporting sponsors Cinionic, EFILM, FuseFX, Sim, Stephen Arnold Music, and Wipster, and foundation members Avid, Dolby, Efilm, Encore, and Deluxe. For sponsorship information, contact Joyce Cataldo at jcataldo@hpaonline.com.
  7. Pacific Post, a full-service editorial equipment rental and services provider, has expanded its footprint with the opening of a new 10,000 square-foot facility in Sherman Oaks. The new location offers 25 spacious Avid suites with 24/7 technical support, alongside a writer’s room and several production offices. Pacific Post has retrofit the entire site which is supported by Avid NEXIS shared storage, 1 gigabyte of dedicated fiber internet connectivity, and individually climate-controlled rooms. “We recently provided equipment and services to the editorial team on Game Over, Man! for Netflix in Sherman Oaks, and continued to receive inquiries from other productions in the area,” says Pacific Post Vice President Kristin Kumamoto. “The explosion we’ve seen in scripted production, especially for streaming platforms, prompted our decision to add this building to our offerings.” Kumamoto notes that a screening room is also near completion for accommodating multiple members of the creative team on a project. It features a 150-inch screen and JVC 4K projector for VFX reviews and an enhanced, in-house viewing experience. Additional amenities at Pacific Post Sherman Oaks include MPAA-rated security, reserved parking, a full kitchen and lounge, VoIP phone systems, a substantial electrical infrastructure. “We are laser focused on serving the needs of the editorial community,” adds Kumamoto. “This expansion provides our high level of services at one convenient location with the technical expertise that clients have come to trust here at Pacific Post.” In addition to this new state-of-the art space, Pacific Post also has facilities in Hollywood and North Hollywood. This third location at 14225 Ventura Boulevard offers a best-in-class option for productions working in the San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles. For more information, visit www.pacpost.com.
  8. Hi Everyone, I have finished the colour grade on a short film and afterwards, have spotted some shots used with a certain camera throughout the production that have dead pixels. I have scanned through the dailies and can confirm they are present from the day they were shot - so this is nothing to do with any post production or data transfer. My question is whether or not it would be worth trying to fix - or just leave it and hope the majority of viewers wont notice. As I want to avoid any possible degradation and compression of the overall image during the post pipeline. It just might be a bit more obvious on the big screen as this is not a 4K delivery. Any thoughts and experience greatly appreciated. M
  9. Hei guys, I need some help and wonder if any of you creates DCP in DaVinci and if it's possible doing it this way. situation I have a short film (10min long), final export full HD at 25fps 16:9 (but we shot in 2.39 scope so it comes with letterbox). So far Festivals have always been asking for a vimeo link or DVD, and now we've been selecting for a Festival accepting only DCP. in DaVinci in the exporting setting I know you have the video format option of easyDCP -codec: 2K DCP (there's also the option of flat and scope, but I thought as the final export is 16:9 to keep the codec as general 2K DCP and let the cinema screen, or if the film is 2.40 I need to select 'scope'?) -what about max DCP bit rate? -do I need to select/work on any another setting? for instance compression: lossless, interop packaging or encrypt package? I gave it a try and export a version, and I've got this folder with some xml and mxf files, and I litereally never wondered what a DCP really looks like. how then could I open a DCP? so to check colors and everything is the same as my final QuickTime export for instance? thank you so much for any input :) cheers!
  10. 11th Annual Industry Honors Shine Spotlight on Excellence in Sound, Editing, Visual Effects and Color May 16, 2016 (Los Angeles, CA) The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA®) has announced the opening of its Call for Entries in the Creative Categories for the 11th annual HPA Awards. These categories, considered the standard bearer for groundbreaking work and artistic excellence, recognize creative artistry in the field of post production. The HPA Awards promote the achievement of talent, innovation and engineering excellence in the larger professional media content industry. The 11th annual gala awards presentation will be held on the evening of November 17, 2016 at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, California. The HPA Awards now invite entries in the following competitive categories: Outstanding Color Grading - Feature Film Outstanding Color Grading - Television Outstanding Color Grading - Commercial Outstanding Editing - Feature Film Outstanding Editing - Television Outstanding Editing - Commercial Outstanding Sound - Feature Film Outstanding Sound - Television Outstanding Sound - Commercial Outstanding Visual Effects - Feature Film Outstanding Visual Effects - Television Outstanding Visual Effects - Commercial Entries for the Creative Categories will be accepted between May 16 and July 8, 2016, and Early Bird Entries (reduced entry fee for the Creative Categories) will be taken through June 10, 2016. To be considered eligible, work must have debuted domestically and/or internationally during the eligibility period, September 9, 2015 through September 6, 2016. Entrants do not need to be members of the Hollywood Professional Association or working in the U.S. As announced previously, the Call for Entries remains open for the following special award categories: Engineering Excellence Award HPA Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation These awards will also be bestowed at the November gala. The May 20, 2016 deadline is approaching for entries in these special competitive categories. Additional honors, including the HPA Lifetime Achievement Award, will be announced later this year. Seth Hallen, President of the HPA and a founding member of the HPA Awards Committee, commented, "Over the past 10 years, the HPA Awards have grown to become one of the most important venues of recognition for creative talent in our industry. Considered a standard-bearer, these awards are uniquely meaningful to the winners and nominees since the judging panels are made up of their peers. I heartily encourage individuals and companies that worked on all of the amazing projects from the past year to enter the HPA Awards creative categories. This is our opportunity to shine a light on the talent and effort that goes into bringing stories to life and to the individuals who play such important roles in making it all happen. We look forward to another very special event on November 17th." For a list of the previous years' winners, click here. Complete rules, guidelines and entry information for the Creative Categories and all of the HPA Awards are available at: www.hpaawards.net. The HPA Awards are made possible through the generous sponsorship of Title Sponsor Blackmagic Design; Foundation Members Avid, Co3, Deluxe, Dolby. EFILM, Encore; and Gold Sponsor Sohonet. For sponsorship or program advertising opportunities, contact Mary Vinton or Jeff Victor by visiting HPA Awards website at www.hpaawards.net or calling 213.614.0860. Opening of ticket sales will be announced shortly.
  11. Hey there, I'm unsure where to start, so I'm just going to say it all. I have a feature which was graded in FCPX using both a macbook pro and a calibrated monitor. Because most people initially watching the film were going to do so on their computers, we thought it best to find a middle ground for exposure and color so that it could be played on a computer, television or in a theater. Now that the film has been accepted to play publicly, we've been told that the blu-rays will be authored by an outside company for exhibition. That company mentioned that each film should have been graded on a monitor, calibrated using SMPTE PLUGe bars, as that is how the projector has been calibrated. Those bars are essentially all one shade of black on a macbook, so now I'm concerned that once projected, my blacks may look lighter than originally intended. What confuses me is that I have tested out my own blu-ray on a few different televisions, and the contrast and color looks good. When projected, could it really be vastly different? Should I re-grade another version specifically for projection exhibtion? And if so, does that mean I would need to bring down all my blacks? We used the scopes and everything is on the line, nothing crushed. And if that's the case, are studios grading several versions for broadcast and streaming? I know it's quite a bit to digest. Any thoughts would be welcomed! Go easy on me, I'm still learning. Thanks so much!
  12. Facility Relocates to Second Line Stages, Adds Finishing Suite NEW ORLEANS (November 16, 2015) - FotoKem has expanded its award-winning post production services in New Orleans, and moved into a new space here at Second Line Stages, a production hub for the local filmmaking community in the heart of the Lower Garden District. Previously situated downtown near the French Quarter, FotoKem has been supporting local productions and providing quick deployment of its on-set and near-set nextLAB systems since 2011. As part of the expansion, FotoKem has added a dedicated Mac-based Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve suite to allow for conform and color services. The facility's comprehensive offerings in the region include advanced file-based dailies, offline editorial systems, media management, and global file delivery. FotoKem's new space offers 1gig, 10gig, and SDI routing capabilities to the dailies rooms. FotoKem clients will also have access to Second Line Stage's 2K Christie theater, with direct SDI signal routing to and from the FotoKem suites in the near future. Second Line Stages is a USGBC (United States Green Building Council) LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) GOLD campus, making FotoKem's new office space more energy and resource-efficient. The building also provides increased security controls. FotoKem's Peter Santoro, VP of Feature and Commercial Services, has overseen the company's presence and relationships with the local filmmaking community since its opening four years ago. Santoro notes, "FotoKem's presence in Louisiana has been a great experience for our entire team. We've worked on 50-plus projects with more in the queue, and, in the process, developed long-standing relationships and built new ones. Our relocation is a testament to FotoKem's commitment to support the creative community with cutting-edge technical and creative solutions." Productions shooting in New Orleans that have relied on FotoKem include Into the Badlands, Astronaut's Wives Club, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, The D Train, and 99 Homes.
  13. JL Cooper Eclipse CX Coloring Board. Has very little wear or signs of use and comes equipped with an ethernet in the port. All lights and functions work perfectly. It was previously used to grade feature films but we don’t use it anymore. For a full list of features and specifications, please see below: Features • Works with DaVinci Resolve • New support in Snell Archangel Ph.C - HD • Speeds Color Grading Workflow • Integrated Compact Control Surface Saves Space • Precise, Hi-Resolution, Professional Quality Controls • Easy-to-See Illuminated Keyswitches • Attractive, Low Profile and Compact Design • Software for OSX Lets You Use Eclipse CX with Any Application. (A JLCooper Exclusive) Specifications • Width - 25.75 in (65.4 cm) • Depth - 11.5 in (29.21 cm) • Height - 3.25 in (8.26 cm) • Weight - 14 lb (6.35 kg)
  14. Greetings People, My first post, had a search and can't find anything specific on the subject (please correct me if I'm wrong) The 'TV Movie Look' I first heard this on an episode of Entourage where a Director fires his cinematographer due to making his film look like a TV Movie. After hearing this I looked into it and you can just tell now when a film, or series have that 'look' So my question really is, what makes it look like that, and how in the hell can you really avoid it lol A great example is anything by 'The Asylum' lol
  15. BURBANK, CA - FotoKem recently completed the digital intermediate and post production services for the indie film Palo Alto. Working with director/screenwriter Gia Coppola and cinematographer Autumn Durald, FotoKem colorist Alastor Arnold fine-tuned the natural look created in camera to ensure the filmmakers' vision for this teen tale is reflected on the big screen. Based on James Franco's short story collection about rebellious high school kids in suburban California, Palo Alto has been praised for Coppola's coming-of-age storytelling and for Durald's evocative photography. The film, which marks Coppola's feature debut, garnered raves at the Tribeca, Telluride, Toronto and Venice film festivals before its recent release. "Gia and I had worked together on five projects prior to this feature, so we have a similar visual language, taste and sensibilities," says Durald. "Gia is from a photography background, and we pulled a lot of photographic references for the tone and mood we wanted - photos by Stephen Shore and William Eggleston. It was important to have a more filmic, softer texture to the image that harkened back to movies like The Outsiders and Dazed and Confused - something that looked more aged with softer tones in the blacks as well. And nothing overly saturated and contrasty." Durald shot the feature with a Panavised RED Epic camera, mounted with Panavision Super Speed lenses and vintage 1970s glass to give a softer feel to the image. The on-set DIT handled basic data management and adjusted stills in REDCINE-X, but no LUTs were applied. Durald's RED raw R3D files were transcoded for final color using REDlogFilm for flexibility with various film/lab emulations. When Coppola and Durald met with Arnold, they brought their look-book of still photography and suggested some films for him to watch, including The Last Picture Show, American Graffiti and The Virgin Suicides. They also experimented with different combinations of film emulation LUTs and grain treatments on various scenes from the feature. "First and foremost, they wanted a very filmic approach to keeping the image natural, smooth, and most importantly beautiful," recalls Arnold. "We weren't pushing in a hyper digital direction. Autumn's photography was awesome, a unique look with a consistency of tonality - it was in a very warm place with naturalistic skin tones." Arnold demonstrated Fuji and Kodak film emulation LUTs along with variants involving slightly different color spaces and lab processes. "We were really happy with the Kodak LUT as the base, and then we added grain over that as well," says Durald. Using the Quantel Pablo for grading, Arnold suggested using its noise treatment feature in different blending modes and intensities to give a grain pass to the entire film. "It all ran in real time, so it was really interactive and fast to adjust noise to emulate different exposures," he reports. He gave particular attention to sodium vapor night exterior shots, tilting toward warm ambers instead of greens and making sure that black levels "felt appropriate for night but didn't bury anything - you always felt you could get into them." Arnold credits Durald's talents as a DP with making the DI process more about collaboration and experimentation than fixing things. "We never struggled to match a key to another key or to even things out," Arnold notes. "It was all about finding the right feel, tonalities, densities and grain. It was great to have the filmmakers walk in with a concise understanding of where they wanted to go stylistically with the finish." Durald concludes, "Alastor has a really great eye - he understood what we were going for from the outset. It's really important to find people with the same taste and sensibilities you have who can translate your visual language emotionally and technically."
  16. Here is a tutorial video I posted on YouTube on how to get timecode on DSLR clips and other post production workflow tips. Mac centric.! Or you can read my blog post at http://remoteaccesspost.com/adding-timecode-to-dslr-footage/ Hope you find it useful!
  17. Veteran Facility Owner Werner Winkelmann Will Oversee Motion Picture Film Processing (SYDNEY, Australia) Neglab, a motion picture film laboratory for processing 35mm and 16mm color negative, will reopen its doors later this month, providing high-quality film processing services to the region. Werner Winkelmann, original owner of the facility, has over 25 years of experience working in the lab industry and brings extensive expertise to the entire imaging chain. "All of us at Neglab are thrilled to re-engage with the filmmaking community and provide outstanding lab services for the region," says Winkelmann, co-founder and technical operations manager. "We are poised to provide unparalleled services, and have brought together a staff of professionals with incredible knowledge and a dedication to superior quality control standards." A recognized expert in the laboratory business, Winkelmann has been involved in building ECN2, ECP2 and ECP3, and black-and-white processors throughout his career. Joining him at Neglab will be Herbert Stegbauer, director and owner of Stegbauer Pty., manufacturer and supplier of film processing equipment. Stegbauer started his career at Colorfilm and later co-founded Filmlab Engineering. Neglab will operate out of Stegbauer's factory. Together, Winkelmann and Stegbauer have assembled a team of experts with over 80 years of experience in the film industry. Neglab has been designed to provide superior motion picture laboratory services to filmmakers, installing the latest design magnetic drive processor, and surpassing standards for cleanliness. The backup and safety systems on Neglab's processor ensure trouble free operation and perfect processing of 35mm and 16mm color negative formats. "Customer service is a priority for us," adds Winkelmann. "We know that labs need to be responsive to filmmakers. We offer location pick up and handling anywhere within the Sydney central business district, and all rushes will be quickly delivered directly to the production's telecine facility of choice. We can also arrange Interstate shipments at reasonable rates, when requested by the customer." Neglab originally opened in July 1997, and briefly suspended operations a few years ago based on industry economics. But with today's production landscape and a resurging choice by filmmakers to originate on film, Winkelmann saw an opportunity to reopen. For more information on Neglab, contact w.winkelmann.48@gmail.com, or call +0409.928.117. # Media Contacts: ignite strategic communications Sally Christgau - direct 415.238.2254 / sally@ignite.bz
  18. (HOLLYWOOD, CA) Margarita Mix Hollywood, a FotoKem company that has been providing award-winning audio post services to the entertainment and advertising industries for 34 years, has developed a unique post production finishing workflow that includes the addition of two color suites and an upgraded hub for media management. The expansion and inventive new process enable content creators to complete audio and video work simultaneously at a single facility, adding speed and cost efficiencies to the workflow. The new color suites are completely integrated with the existing audio bays, utilizing Nucoda Film Master color grading systems to ensure unmatched Avid integration with direct connectivity to the ISIS and Avocent network. Through this network, the experts at Margarita Mix are able to access audio and video elements from multiple terminals at the facility. As part of the expansion, Margarita Mix has added colorists Troy Smith and Michael Mintz, and online editor Adam St. Clair, to their family of artists and engineers. Margarita Mix clients that utilize ISIS media servers from FotoKem's Nonlinear Services Division can now tap into the high-speed fiber connection between facilities, eliminating the need for transporting tapes and drives across town. Addressing the frequent need for shot replacement and other creative changes during the finishing process, this direct connection to the client's servers allows new media to be prepped and incorporated quickly. A variety of content creators have utilized Margarita Mixes' augmented capabilities in the last 18 months. Their projects include Ridiculousness, Top Gear U.S.A., Life Below Zero, Fantasy Factory, Breaking Pointe, The Glee Project, and Richard Hammond's Crash Course. Dustin Montez, Post Supervisor for Ridiculousness and Fantasy Factory, was one of the first clients to utilize the new color capabilities and expanded services offered by FotoKem and Margarita Mix. "With our space and equipment rented from FotoKem, the streamlining of our services made perfect sense. The fact that the buildings are connected via fiber saves us, literally, hours of time. When there are fixes, everything is instantly sent back and forth. In our business, it ultimately comes down to the people, and we love our team at Margarita Mix - our colorist, sound designer, the engineers, everyone we work with is top notch. The workflow is easy, saving me time and money, and I don't have to worry about anything. Any type of show would benefit from collaborating with Margarita Mix." Margarita Mix brings award-winning sound services to the pipeline, with four full mixing suites featuring 5.1 surround sound, as well as stations where sound design and pre-lay can take place. The facility's talented mixers frequently contribute to animated and reality shows, as well as gaming and long- and short-form projects. Rand Gladden, Senior Vice President of FotoKem, explains, "We knew that combining the power of our network with one-stop audio/video finishing would result in some major advantages in cost and time. This is especially a game changer for reality TV productions that may not have previously had access to high-end workflows at an affordable price point." Veneta Butler, General Manager of Margarita Mix, adds, "Our clients have been asking for centralized services for years, and now it's a reality. Shots on the editorial ISIS across town can be replaced in minutes during an audio or video finishing session at Margarita Mix, providing incredible efficiencies and the ability to work on every aspect of their projects simultaneously." Gladden adds, "The connection and design of these facilities will empower collaboration; when there are tight turnarounds, creative changes, and advancing deliveries, this will be a great value-add for the creative process." About Margarita Mix Hollywood Established in 1983, Margarita Mix is a premiere audio and video post-production facility located in the heart of the Hollywood media district. They provide a wide variety of services, including audio mixing, color grading, online editing, sound design, ADR, and voice over recording. Their projects include television shows, feature films, commercials, animation, video games, DVD commentaries, and web-based content. For more information, visit www.lastudios.com. About FotoKem FotoKem is an independently-owned, full-service post production facility serving the worldwide creative community. Since 1963, the company has been a trusted resource for every corner of the entertainment market, providing broad post production expertise, high-end solutions and innovative in-house technologies. The company assists filmmakers in successfully bridging production and post, helping navigate the expanding world of motion picture finishing technology. FotoKem offers a broad spectrum of services, including a full service film lab, file-based workflows, digital intermediates, digital cinema packaging, mobile dailies, global data delivery, film and video finishing, audio mixing and mastering, visual effects, restoration, and production rentals. FotoKem has expanded over the years with the acquisition of SPY Post, Keep Me Posted, L.A. Studios, and Margarita Mix. For more information visit www.fotokem.com, or follow FotoKem on Facebook and Twitter. # # # Media Contacts: Lisa Muldowney / Chris Purse ignite strategic communications 818.980.3473 lisa@ignite.bz / chris@ignite.bz
  19. Hey guys, We've established a new production house in Lebanon, Middle East. We provide all kinds of audio-visual media services from Pre production to post. Check our website and let us know what you think: www.pandorafilms.tv
  20. I am shooting several action scences using a green screen behind the action. This will be a 3 camera shot; 1st camera left at a 45 degree facing center stage, 2nd camera set center stage and the 3rd camera right facing 45 degrees facing center stage. All camera's are locked and spaced equally apart. How or what plug-in (if needed) to After Effects or Premeire Pro would I need to create a seemless movement interacting with all 3 cameras. The transition movement needs fast from camera 1 to 3 and slower in different action parts. In other words, I am would like the 3 camera's to work as one, and I manipulate how I want each scence to look; like the Matrix, but with constant video movement. No still images that rotate to different angles. I look forward to advice, tips, recommendation, etc... If their is a answer I know y'all wil help.
  21. FotoKem and SPY (a FotoKem company) combined in-house talent and key post-production services for the Sundance winning film Fruitvale, written and directed by Ryan Coogler with cinematography by Rachel Morrison. The film won the festival’s coveted Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award for a drama, and was acquired by The Weinstein Company soon after its premiere screening. Providing end-to-end services for the Super 16 mm project, FotoKem and SPY worked closely with the filmmakers from start to finish. Fruitvale was processed and transferred at FotoKem in Burbank. The files were delivered to SPY’s headquarters in San Francisco, where colorist Chris Martin color graded the film with Coogler and Morrison. The two facilities are securely connected by a high-speed network offering real-time interface capabilities between the locations to provide the creative community with easy access to the full breadth of post-production services that FotoKem and its companies offer. Fruitvale follows the final day of 22-year old Oscar Grant, who was gunned down by a police officer at the Fruitvale stop of an Oakland transit line. The tragedy was caught on video, and the incident made national headlines. The movie was shot on location in San Francisco. The Super 16 footage was then shipped to Burbank, scanned to HDCAM SR, and conformed at SPY. “When I met with Ryan and Rachel prior to production, they were committed to shooting film. They felt strongly that film would convey the emotion they wanted to draw from Oscar's character,” recalls Martin. “Our color grade supported the quality of grain and tonal palette that the Super 16 format brought to the story. Specifically, we approached the process as if we were timing in a film laboratory, avoiding the feeling of a digital grade. Building in contrast and adding weight to the mid-tones, rather than overcooking the shadows and highlights, brought a very specific emotional element to the film. The result is a feeling of intimacy that holds the personality of the film and supports Rachel’s amazing camera work. Obviously the audience at Sundance agreed!” Martin notes that Fruitvale can be divided into two worlds - the quiet intimate world of Oscar and his family, and the larger institutional world where Oscar encounters conflict. “Oscar's world tends to be defined by warmer scenes with more intimate contrast while the institutional scenes are seen with a wider lens and more mixed lighting, embracing an observational feel,” says Martin. “So while we maintained the same approach for all the scenes, there's a wonderful dichotomy between the two worlds.” “We are honored to have collaborated with the talented team behind Fruitvale. At FotoKem, we continually strive to offer independent filmmakers the workflow expertise that they need, and invest in the talent and technology to support their creative visions,” says FotoKem’s Mike Brodersen.
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