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Found 11 results

  1. Im new to the forum and have a long question, but I have read a lot of posts here before so I am turning to you all for help! I bought my first super 8 camera, a Canon 310xl a couple of months ago, and in January, I bought two cartridges of Tri-X reversal to shoot with. I am a college student, so I did not have a chance to shoot until last week, so until then I kept the two carts in the fridge to keep cool. So last week, I finally opened my first box of Tri-X and loaded it into my camera. I notched hack the cart so I could control the built in filter as well! I turned the camera on and pulled the trigger, and the film ran for about 30 frames before the film transport indicator in my viewfinder stopped running, indicating that the film was not moving. So i opened my camera and pulled the cartridge out and the film had snapped! The whole cart gone. So I chalked it up to maybe a faulty cart, so I loaded my second one. And you guessed it, the exact same thing happened! Both my catridges with snapped film. So my question: Why did this happen and what can I do to fix it? I don't know enough about yet to be able to figure out whats causing the film to just break. Did the film get brittle from being in my refrigerator too long? Or is something wrong with my camera, is it too fast? Is something wrong with the takeup hooks? I just don't know. I have called Kodak about getting replacements, but scared that the same thing will happen again. If you may know anything about why my film is breaking after 30 frames I would appreciate your help. Im a college student, I can't afford just buying more film if I will never be able to shoot with it. Thanks!
  2. ...I've been shooting Tri-X since my student days in 1992. I love it's qualities and nothing quite compares to it. I'm beginning to wonder just how long Kodak will continue to produce this B&W reversal stock. Should I be bulk buying it or am I just a bit paranoid after 'losing' K40, 64T and 100D ???
  3. Hello All! New user here and I'm hoping this great community can help me out. For the past week, I have been desperately trying to find a comprehensive and complete guide to processing Kodak Super 8 Tri-X 7266 at home. I can't seem to find any localized complete source of information on how to do this--while I've been able to find what sort of materials I'd need, the chemistry bit seems really though to understand. There seems to be multiple opinions on what sort of chemistry to use, but no real guide on how to do it or which chemistry works best. Now to be honest, I've never developed reversal film at home before--however, I do have a darkroom, and have been devleoping my own still film (black and white and color) since I was about 13 (I'm 25 now.) I've been shooting Super 8 (and Reg. 8, and some 16 here and there) for a long time now, and I'm to the point where I'm shooting so much of it, I think it might make sense to invest up front in the materials to develop at least Super 8 Tri-X at home. I should also say: I'm not a chemist--I have a degree in English, so I took 1 chemistry class in all of my education--and it was the history of chemicals--so my ability to understand how chemistry works is pretty sad, to be honest--I know how to follow mixing instructions on bottles and packets--that's about it! I'm just interested in processing the film for reversal results--I'm not interested in cross processing or anything 'artistic'--I'd like to just reproduce the results from the lab, if at all possible Can anyone provide a resource that goes over exactly what chemicals to use to process Super 8 Tri-X 7266 (and possibly where to buy them), mixing instructions, and processing times? I would be forever in your debt! Here's my materials list: -Chemistry -Spiral Lomo Tank -Containers for chemistry? -100 or 300 watt bulb -Drying device (Morse Drying Drum (or similar) Thanks to all for your time and help! Owen - Cleveland.
  4. Hi friends, I'm reversal processing Tri-X Super8 film using Dokumol (paper developer) and Dichromate/sulphuric acid bleach. My first attempts were good, but I mixed up a new batch of chemistry and now it seems that there is no shadow detail. The highlight areas are good, but the shadows all fall to complete black. I'm not sure what part of the process might be causing this. Maybe if the bleach is too strong, would that have this effect? I used a different source for the sulphuric acid, perhaps of a different concentration than previously.
  5. Hello, finally got round to processing some 35mm still tri-x at home using R09 one shot and leaving if for an hour with a little agitation at the beginning and middle. Then stop and rinse. I liked the results but I fear this might be too much for smaller formats. I've got a dusty lomo tank and I was thinking it may be better with Acufine, do I need to use any other chemicals? I want to get as fine results as I can before sending them off for a telecine, also if anybody as any tips on how to store them afterwards so them don't get damaged that would be great. A long time film lover, but I'm very new to processing at home.. Thanks for any help. David
  6. Dear Cinematographers, For a silent short film on which I am working, I desire a grainy and dark texture. I am using Tri-X super 8 black and white film. I thought perhaps that, to my unguided reflection, it would be best achieved by underexposing two stops and then using a one-stop push in processing. Would any untoward complications arise in doing so? Would there be any superior alternative? Thank you in advance. Sincerely, K. Cassidy-Gabhart
  7. Tri-X anomaly in photographing nukes in the 1950'sI have been working on a project for a few years now in researching atomic testing photography from the 1950s and 1960s. There is a certain type of photography done on a camera called the Rapatronic which was developed by EG&G (Doc Edgerton's company). The Rapatronic took single shots. Two type of rapatronic cameras were developed. The original camera which has a basic exposure of 4µsec photographs the image onto a 3x4 glass plate. The newer Rapatronic (developed in 1956-1957) had a basic exposure of 5µsec and was imaged on 3x4 sheet film. On all of the sheet film negatives, there are additional images of what looks like what is called a "corona discharge" or similar to krilian photography around the blast. I believe this is in the UV range and if photographed in color, would be bluish purple. However, this additional imagery shows up only on the sheet film at 5µsec exposure whereas the same image, shot with the same focal length lens, same film type (Tri-X) on glass and NO FILTRATION on either, does not show this anomaly at all. Not even a hint of it. Is it possible that the Tri-X sheet film and Tri-X glass plate react to images and spectrum differently, especially in the UV range that would explain why anomaly shows up on one but not the other. Is the difference between a 4µsec and 5µsec exposure that great? Maybe 1/3 of a stop difference? Any thoughts?
  8. I am seeking some advice/input on the possibility of developing Super 8 Tri X film at home using the Caffenol C-H recipe. I am experienced in developing 35mm Tri-X Negative film (for still photos) using this recipe and have gotten results that I am happy with. I am looking to shoot some Tri-X Super 8 film which I know is reversal. Say I am only looking to get a negative, would my same process (wash, dev, stop, fix, rinse, wash, dry) for still 35mm Tri X work with Super 8? Will I get a useable negative? Could I stuff the film into my 20 oz developing tank that I use for my 35mm rolls? Or would I need to buy something a bit bigger? Thanks.
  9. Hello, I'm trying to process Tri-x super 8 in a Morse G3 tank for the first time. Except for a couple frames at the beginning and end of the roll- it's all coming out as negative. What point in the process could I be messing up that's causing this? Does it sound like insufficient re-exposure? Thank you in advance for your advice. I haven't posted on this forum before but I've been reading it for a while and I really appreciate the resource.
  10. FOR SALE: Just serviced Canon AF514XL-S AUTO FOCUS Super 8 Cine Camera. FULLY TESTED using Tri-X, with a crystal clear lens and in perfect working order. Trade / Offers around the £65 GB Pounds (about $100 US Dollars) mark please!
  11. Hi, Here we are in the twilight of motion picture reversal stocks. Be that as it may be, I have spent the best part of a year learning how to load my K-3, I finally got it, and today no film jams - smooth running on Tri-X all the way ;) I have a new lens as well, the last one was full of lens fungus :-o The mirror through the viewfinder is dreadfully tarnished. It doesn't really bother me that much, but can I clean it? Shame to have a grubby mirror if it can be cleaned up a little. Am in the UK btw so anything I do will have to be DIY, I don't think there are any K-3 boffins over here. Many bests, Ric
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