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How Do I Shoot An LCD Screen?


DorSinai
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Hey

 

I will shoot a short flick in Super 16 and i have a scene with a computer screen. i have consulted with several people. Some told me about a device called the "Phase-Shifter" but the really know-how's told me that if its LCD above 4ms (milli-seconds) then i dont need a phase shifter or anything.

 

The screen is LENOVO L171 (LCD) 15". it says in the specification that the screen is 8ms.

 

Im shooting at Super 16 and the screen has a lot of screen time.

 

Thanx!

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Yeah, we're seeing a lot of films now that are using LCD's and plasmas for shooting televisions nowadays. Mostly for product placement, but I imagine it's easier too with the non-phasing issues.

 

Regarding the color temperature, Bernhard's right. You should watch the new NBC show "30 Rock". I saw it for the first time last night, and every shot of an LCD television was VERY blue, so they're probably daylight balanced.

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Hey

 

I will shoot a short flick in Super 16 and i have a scene with a computer screen. i have consulted with several people. Some told me about a device called the "Phase-Shifter" but the really know-how's told me that if its LCD above 4ms (milli-seconds) then i dont need a phase shifter or anything.

 

The screen is LENOVO L171 (LCD) 15". it says in the specification that the screen is 8ms.

 

Im shooting at Super 16 and the screen has a lot of screen time.

 

Thanx!

Hi

There is no problem with the phase of your screen just get in menu of the screen and fix the colors a litle wormer if you are using tungsten film. if you are shooting full frame of the screen you can fix the litle diference on cc. If your scrren is just plays in scene the is no problem of the little color diferense. BYT if your are going for blowing up full frame lcd screen try to get a screen with the less grain in the market.

cheep screens blurs the image. USE LC3 filter for lower contrast.

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a big thank you for all those who answered.

I will shoot with a daylight film and the screen will have a lot of full frame screen time.

I must say i didnt quite get what thanasis diamantopoulos has said. im a beginner guys.

Will i be in need of an 85 filter? if its daylight and i can change the screen colors in the screen itself am i all set to go?

:) this Cinematography.com business Rocks.

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Will i be in need of an 85 filter? if its daylight and i can change the screen colors in the screen itself am i all set to go?

No need for 85 on daylight stock, but check your monitor or graphic-card settings, on a mac you can choose colortemperatur in the monitor-menu, it goes from 4500K to 9000K, factory setting is 6507K, not sure if it's accurate...I guess each screen is a little different

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No need for 85 on daylight stock, but check your monitor or graphic-card settings, on a mac you can choose colortemperatur in the monitor-menu, it goes from 4500K to 9000K, factory setting is 6507K, not sure if it's accurate...I guess each screen is a little different

 

 

What is the best K to shoot with? will i know by looking through the viewfinder? or should i just fix it beforehand?

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What is the best K to shoot with? will i know by looking through the viewfinder? or should i just fix it beforehand?

 

You won't be able to see accuracy of color temperature by eye (or the viewfinder). Film is more sensitive to differences in color temperature than your eye.

 

When using daylight balanced filmstock, a color temperature closest to 5600K will be close to correct. You can use a digital still camera or video camera to look at the screen's color compared to the surroundings as a guide to color balancing the screen (set your digital camera to daylight WB, not "auto").

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If you're shooting NTSC 24FPS(60Hz), I dont believe you'll have problems if the monitor's refresh rate is also at 60Hz. If you're shooting PAL 25FPS(50Hz) then you should set your monitor accordingly as well. You can also play with shutter angle (provided your camera have variable shutter). When I was shooting a TV screen we used an Arri SR3 and changed the shutter angle to 172.8degrees.

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If you're shooting NTSC 24FPS(60Hz), I dont believe you'll have problems if the monitor's refresh rate is also at 60Hz. If you're shooting PAL 25FPS(50Hz) then you should set your monitor accordingly as well. You can also play with shutter angle (provided your camera have variable shutter). When I was shooting a TV screen we used an Arri SR3 and changed the shutter angle to 172.8degrees.

 

You're thinking of a CRT screen, or maybe a Plasma. Most LCD's have a long enough decay rate and a high enough refresh rate that generally you don't have to adjust frame rate or shutter speed to shoot them, you can just use the standard 24 fps / 180 degree shutter.

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