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Found 43 results

  1. I’m shooting with V3 500T 7219 this weekend and I haven’t been able to find a good source of information regarding using LED fixtures (Lite Mat Plus 1 S2, Hive Wasp-100C, Quasar Q-LED) on film. According to the Kodak via the Vision 3 brochure it states “If the kind of lamp is unknown, a KODAK WRATTEN2 Color Compensating Filter CC30R + CC20Y can be used with an exposure index (EI) of 250. Light Source Exposure Index “ which seems like a safer bet, however I was going to mix in a few Tungsten fixtures for hard light. Has anyone worked with these LED lamps and V3 500T? Or any thoughts on how to rate them? Most of the lamps will be colored to 3200K but a couple will be 5600K. Ideally the LED fixtures would be helpful to make small soft sources. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to test this week before hand, so any advice would be appreciated. Also this will be 24fps only. I’m aware that the CRI is an important factor in this. Also I’m assuming color temp is going to effect my rating. I’m going to reach out to a couple manufactures and see what they recommend as well. Thanks
  2. Hey everyone, This might be a question that exposes my ignorance, but recently I was asked if I could grade a 30 minute documentary for someone. I happen to do a lot of color correction for my job as well as just for fun when I want to mess around in Resolve, so I was confident that I could do what the director was asking for (she said she wants it to look true to life, so mostly just primary corrections it sounds like). Then she told me that the footage was V-Log 4K shot on the Panasonic EVA1 and asked if I have a 4K monitor, which I don't. What I do have is an IPS 1920x1200 monitor, specifically a ProArt ASUS PA248Q, and a ColorMunki. I have graded C100, FS5ii, GH4, and even downscaled RED footage on this monitor with good results, but because she specifically asked if my monitor is 4K, I'm beginning to wonder if maybe my monitor wouldn't be accurate enough for her project. As far as I know, the only problems I would have are judging sharpness and noise, but as far as color goes it should be fairly accurate regardless of my monitor's resolution as long as I calibrate properly, right? Or is there something I'm missing here? I'd love to help with her project, but I also don't want to waste her time. What do you guys think?
  3. Would limiting myself to using only the 9 or 10 Storaro gels from Rosco be a reasonable creative strategy for maximizing visual impact while streamlining the decision process? (With the exception of CTB, CTO, and CTS, of course). Are his colors versatile enough to tell every kind of story, convey every emotion? Why? I’m exhausted. Between Lee, Rosco, Apollo, and GAM there are thousands of gel colors available. But I’m old as old can be and don’t have time to learn the nuances of so many options before I’m dead. Plus, Vittorio is a much greater genius than most of us...
  4. Colorist Aidan Stanford has joined Keep Me Posted (KMP), a FotoKem company specializing in creative and technical episodic post-production services. In his role as senior colorist, Stanford builds upon Fotokem’s roster of creative talent that serves episodic and feature projects. With over 25 years of experience, Stanford brings unique expertise including proficiencies on color grading systems. His experience ranges from photochemical color timing to digital color grading and includes DI, broadcast, commercials and shorts. His varied background includes color timing 65mm film for LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (IMAX 2002 restoration/release); the DI, HDR and all video deliverables for the Oscar-winning GET OUT; and multiple seasons of Emmy Award-winning television series. His credits include the features HAPPY DEATH DAY, INSIDIOUS 4 and BENJI and his episodic credits include MODERN FAMILY, DRUNK HISTORY, YOU’RE THE WORST and FRESH OFF THE BOAT. Stanford noted, “No other facility offers the breadth of service for filmmakers that is available within the FotoKem family of companies. There is a dedication to customers and a meticulous approach to the work that is in perfect sync with my own. KMP is a highly respected facility, and I am delighted to join the talented team here.” Mike Brodersen, FotoKem’s Chief Strategy Officer, commented on the addition of Stanford to the creative services team. “Aidan brings a deep knowledge of film, an artistic eye and a keen technical ability to help our creative customers bring their vision to reality. His comprehensive skill set in combination with his expertise in color have made him a trusted collaborator with many filmmakers and show runners. We are delighted to have him on our team.”
  5. Hello everyone, If this has been covered in a previous post please link, I was unable to find much on a few cursory searches. I am requesting advice or suggestions for a good lab who I can send Super 8 cartridges to for processing, telecine, and most importantly good quality post and colour grading. I am based in the UK (London). Normally I rely on someone local who hand-process the film and does all the post for me. I have always been very happy with his work, but I'm interested to see what kind of results I can get from a 'lab'. I am aware of Andec in Berlin ( andecfilm.de ) and the S8 Reversal Lab in the Netherlands ( super8.nl ). Though I have no experience with their service or even if they provide a Grading/Post service. Anyway, I am requesting suggestions, based on experience, of good labs. I'm happy to ship internationally NY, LA etc. for good results. Ideally it would stay EU though. Keep in mind, I am not seeking cinematic quality, for me the decision to use Super8 has always been a point a shoot, in camera, portable film format, so I am not seeking perfection. My main concern is over levels of noise and uneven exposures which I feel might be remedied with a higher quality transfer and greater attention to detail in the grading process (never mind my lack of attention to these details during the filming). I sincerely appreciate your advice, suggestions and shared knowledge. All the best
  6. Hi all, I was wondering how one would go about exposing or even using color effect filters like color gradients, Coral, Antique Suede or Day for Night optical filters while shooting on a digital camera and delivering in color. For example, say that you are using an Antique Suede. Wouldn't depriving the sensor of blue light be very destructive to the raw image? To my understanding the blue channel displays the most noticeable noise the most often. If so, how would you combat this? What are the advantages of doing such an important color decision in camera rather than in post apart from the "stops people from messing with your image" argument? Are there any clear optical or overall quality differences? Thanks in advance!
  7. Amateur editor/color grader here. Just got some Alexa footage in that is very very gold and warm, both before and after a Log C to Rec709 LUT. I was at the shoot and everything looked properly balanced on the monitors. In fact we even have photos of the monitors from shoot day and it all looks pretty balanced. Our DP was shooting at 4300K in Tungsten (indoors) which seem quite warm to me, but he claims there's no way the footage should look as warm as it does on my end after sending him screenshots. Wondering if the footage was incorrectly dumped or if it was incorrectly imported into Resolve on my end, or if shooting 4300K in Tungsten is just that warm. Attached is shot with rec709 LUT applied as well as photo of the monitor day-of-shoot.
  8. Im am curious to gather some opinions. I plan on shooting a short in the near future on 16mm. Naturally my choice of stocks are limited to Kodak, and for production purposes 250D would be my best option. Now, really hate doing color correction and DI. I dont like doing it myself, and I dont want to pay to get a colorist to do it for me. I am wondering, how accurate are the colors of 250D, raw out of the stock? What sort of work would I have to do in post to make them accurate. Are there options for me in filtration to normalize the stock? My thought process is, that I want the stock to have an accurate color baseline for me to modify to fit my story. I am looking for a warm, medium contrast, and slightly diffused look. Something in between George Washington (2000) and The Long Goodbye (1973). For this, my idea of was to shoot with some TLS Rehoused Super Baltars, and apply a Tiffen Warm Black Pro-Mist 1/4. What do you think?
  9. Originally posted in FILM STOCKS Im am curious to gather some opinions. I plan on shooting a short in the near future on 16mm. Naturally my choice of stocks are limited to Kodak, and for production purposes 250D would be my best option. Now, really hate doing color correction and DI. I dont like doing it myself, and I dont want to pay to get a colorist to do it for me. I am wondering, how accurate are the colors of 250D, raw out of the stock? What sort of work would I have to do in post to make them accurate. Are there options for me in filtration to normalize the stock? My thought process is, that I want the stock to have an accurate color baseline for me to modify to fit my story. I am looking for a warm, medium contrast, and slightly diffused look. Something in between George Washington (2000) and The Long Goodbye (1973). For this, my idea of was to shoot with some TLS Rehoused Super Baltars, and apply a Tiffen Warm Black Pro-Mist 1/4. What do you think
  10. Hey guys! My first post here ;) Currently I'm prepping to shoot my first short-film. I've worked as a DP on commercials and documentaries, but never on narrative film. The script I'll be shooting involves a great amount of tension on the characters almost from beginning to end, so, along with the director (we've worked together a billion time, also as a directing duo) I'm deciding how to bring this tension to the camera. Hard sunlight hitting the subjects face on a low-key enviroment is a great option, but I'm seeking ways to create this tension/contrast through color/color mixing. "Moonlight", shot by James Laxton is a nice reference, so, I was wondering how Laxton accomplished some shots, especially these ones: On an interview, Laxton says he changed the greenish fluorescents from the restaurant to get this blue look (although at the exterior shot they seem quite green to me), the one working as a backlight on the interior shot. I was wondering what kind of lamp is that and at what temperature? I imagine that the inside tungstens are 3200K ~ 2800K, but the outside blue is just to blue to be a regular daylight 5400K. Also, at what white balance was the camera set to be able to capture yellow from the inside and blue from the outside? Thank you guys very much, really happy to be a part of the forum ;)
  11. I'm about to start a feature and because of our schedule as well as dropping temperatures, the possibility of shooting day for night is becoming more and more real. My concern is that having red/orange light in the night scenes is extremely important to the director, but that the grade will suck all of that out. The source for the light is a campfire, but one of the characters will also be bloody and wearing a faded red jacket. I've seen the 40's/50's day for night scenes which have a lighter grade and thus more colors, but those seem to have been done because of the sheer expanse of the locations that needed to be seen. Cast Away is the best example of fire/red light I can find for day for night, however I have read that there were some VFX in those shots. While we do have access to a good VFX house, I want to be able to introduce red light practically as a baseline. One detail, we'll be shooting in the woods in California so I'll have limited generator power due to fire concerns. So essentially I am at a loss. Any advice is deeply appreciated.
  12. Technicolor 2 Strip technique Do you use this technique, guys? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtnJIFWGJHI
  13. Hi, I've been conducting a little research about gel and I wasn't sure the relationship of transmission and stops. Say, a gel has transmission of 30%. Does that mean that the gel reduces the luminance by 70%? If so, is it in lux or lumen or stop? (I don't have a firm understanding of these units so I might be saying random things) Also, is it helpful to know the transmission vs. wavelength chart? I'd also like to know how the colour temperature of an original source affects the end result through gels. Is there a certain colour temperature that's most appropriate for gels? Or is it totally up to users? If you have your way of working with gels that'd be amazing to know as well. Thanks!
  14. Hi everyone, I'm writing a piece on the history of colour correction/grading through the ages and was wondering if any of you have been in the business long enough to have first hand experience of grading with film before it went digital? If any of you have any information about who to talk to or know of anywhere that still processes film (preferably in London), please let me know!
  15. I recently purchased a color chart to use while grading and am curious about how to treat middle grey. Intuition would tell me to place it around 50% on the waveform, and articles I've seen on the subject say 45%. However, I know that different cameras record middle grey differently, for example, C-LOG places middle grey at 32% IRE. I haven't been able to really test it with the C100 I use at work yet, but I'm curious, when grading a C-LOG image, should I correct middle grey to 45-50% IRE, or should I leave it at 32% IRE, and just adjust my highlights and shadows accordingly? Thanks.
  16. Hi all, I wanted to ask to see what people are using on set as an on board color accurate monitors (7 inch or smaller). I find the SmallHD 702/502 to not be as accurate as I would like. Anyone have some recommendations? Looking forward to your thoughts :) Thank you!
  17. Struggling to find any information online about grading a 16mm black and white transfer. I have done grading work but would love some tips on grading 16mm transfer specifically black and white. Any resources would be appreciated.
  18. Update "Color Menu" Kino Flo Select LED DMX Kino Flo Lighting Systems incorpora una actualización al controlador balastro electrónico de las pantallas Kino Flo Select LED DMX. Con esta nueva actualización se incorpora un nuevo menú en el controlador, denominado “Menú de color”. Este incluye 3 canales más (Control de Geles, Ángulo HUE o Ángulo de tono y canal de Saturación). Este complemento nos permite poseer un control casi total sobre el color: - El canal “Geles” dispone de más de 100 gelatinas predeterminadas (cada uno de un color y una saturación específica), pudiendo prescindir de los filtros de gelatina externos. - El canal “Ángulo de Tono” o “Ángulo Hue” nos ofrece la posibilidad de utilizar cualquier grado de color dentro de los 360° disponibles en el Arco Iris. - El canal “Saturación” nos permitirá escoger la intensidad de color de un matiz específico. Además, se amplía el rango de temperatura de color, de 2500K a 9900K. Más información aquí.
  19. Hello, I'm in the early stages of a project and we're heavily leaning towards black and white. My question relates to the CRI of our lighting fixtures. Considering CRI is specifically the Color Rendering Index, can we just ignore it on B&W projects? My first thought is yes, but I want to cover my bases in case I'm forgetting any beneficial qualities high-CRI lights provide beyond accurate color. Furthermore, does the answer change depending on shooting format? (B&W Film vs. Epic/Alexa Monochrome vs. shooting color and grading in post) Thanks for contributing and I appreciate your advice!
  20. Dit, the proffesion | Camaleon Cinema Services Camaleon Rental blog we are going to speak about the role of a DIT. The first question is to define what a DIT is as well as determine if this position belongs to the camera crew or to the postproduction crew. The answer would be that he is kind of a liaison between both department, even though if we have to make a choice we would say that he is part of the camera department since he works on set. The DIT profession (technical image technician), arrives with the appearance of the first high definition cameras and then with the digital cinema cameras. At this point we should remember that when these cameras arrived both directors of photography and assistant cameramen came from working for many years with film cameras. So after the arrival of such new and different gear, it was necessary the inclusion of a new figure to the camera crew in order to advise the DoP on how to squeeze... More info here.
  21. Hi all -- So, I follow Ryan Booth on Instagram, and the guy has a knack for creating really beautiful looks with his Fuji X100T + VSCO (iPhone) combination. It's one of my favorite results from a mobile workflow I've come across, and it's so consistent. Obviously a very teal + orange grade, but I'm wondering how he keeps it almost natural looking without taking it to a complicated desktop setup. I think it could be really helpful to break down for quick grades in the future. Thanks! Jon
  22. Hey guys, I have this job with part day, part night scenes, all exterior, sunny look, but with bad weather on my way. It's a pool party for a fashion film. My budget is not that big, and I have to pick between HMIs or TUNG lights to make all the job. NIght and daylight exterior. Can you send some ideias with your experience? The câmera is a RED EPIC DRAGON. The look of the film is pretty colorfull with a lot of gels and some uv light. Thanks
  23. Learn some great grading techniques by The Mill's senior colorist Damien Van Der Cruyssen. He's incredible talented, and in this Lowepost article he talks about his work on the 'Encounter' spot by Calvin Klein. Damien is specialized in setting distinctive looks for luxury brands, and is also well versed in long-form grading.
  24. Would someone please share tips on working with Magic Bullet Looks? I usually start with my primary color-correction—balancing my Luma scopes, RGB parade and vectorscope in Final Cut Pro X—but would like to grade in Magic Bullet Looks. Does it make sense to do my primary CC *at all* beforehand if I know I’m going to use Magic Bullet Looks for grading afterward? Some people say, when using MBL, you should wait to dial in your scopes as the last step. Thanks for your thoughts!
  25. Hello, I was wondering, how close the Vision 3 films are to each other? Of course the sensitivity and grain differ, but are there much if any differences in terms of colour, contrast and perhaps sharpness too? After all they are being advertised as being intercuttable. If the obvious things like grain are not taken into consideration, would it be impossible to distinguish the different Vision 3 stocks from each other? To a slighty other thing, if the Vision 3 films are very similar, does it make a lot of sense to have 4 stocks that practically look the same? It shouldn't be a big thing to add an extra stop of ND or an 85 filter. Kind regards, Valter
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