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Found 12 results

  1. Hi everyone, thanks for looking through and the advice ahead of time. I have a shoot fast approaching and I'm debating the best way to light my exterior scene for an upcoming commercial. We will begin shooting early morning and we will see a family enter an amusement park from one angle where the sun is backlighting them - and then we will need to reverse the camera to see their POV. It will be a very sunny day I'm sure with no clouds so we should get some nice backlight. I'm debating however whether to front lit with a large ultra bounce (20x20 or 12x12) using the sun to light the family of 4 as they walk in (Wide - Full shot of family - then MID CU of each member). OR if I should also blast some M40s/M90's into the ultra bounce OR light them using 2 of these lights with diffusion frames or softboxes over them. The location has access to 63 amp power so we could run cables to take this power. I want a high key commercial look but want to go down the wisest route here. I have attached a sketch (actual location) in order to get a better idea.... I also plan to use a Job at the back of the family at the end of the street for an establishing shot... Also after I get this I will have to move the camera around facing a street of performers so they will all be front lit by the sun. I could film this first in order to get a more pleasant look with the sun being lower (Maybe use the Frames with Diffusion in case of any camera shadow if need be) and then film the family. Reference Picture attached... Any thoughts you may have on this or experience with similar setups would be super. Cheers all!
  2. Im scouting for a film now where one of the main locations is very dense forest with a solid canopy. The undergrowth is green, the leaves are green, the moss is green, the light even feels green. The tree trunks have very little character and are skinny. I do have a fogger setup and it has tested well- so at least I can bring areas out from what looks like an infinity of skinny trees and greenness. The sun is almost nonexistent, save for some very small dappled beams. My question to you is how can I bring the characters out- especially in the wider shots -without it looking lit or fake? Ill use negative fill when possible and I have some 8x & 12x frames w/ rags and a couple 1.2 hmis. Its a remote location and tiny budget. I was just surprised to see how flat the light was and how a person gets swallowed by the busy yet uniform environment. Oh- and the actors are wearing dull colors-jeans, dark sweatshirts, etc. I will ask wardrobe get a little color contrast against the green environment. Thanks,
  3. Hi guys! Okay so I have a shoot coming very soon. One particular scene is in a garden at night, with friends around a table eating & in conversation. Its gonna be 10/12 seconds in the final video. So I want to put up hanging lights between 3 palm trees in the location with the characters underneath the lights. I tried looking in to research for other DP's who have done this look quite nicely. Deakins in Sicario I found he used 40 watt bulbs and there is quite a lot of them (plus light bouncing back down off the ceiling). Here is an image for reference: So here is now my location. All exterior so no bounce from the lights giving me extra illumination down there. So obviously this will be at night. The hanging fixtures as mentioned will go between the 3 palm trees (table and actors near center). The production designer on our meeting had with her the hanging garden fixtures. She had also 5w bulbs. Each meter of the hanging fixture is 2 bulbs (10 watts with these bulbs). I am worried that once this all is hanged up it won't be enough using these bulbs to light the scene. In my head it's around 200w over the talent heads, but if Deakins is using all 40w bulbs there than it makes me think I need to put higher wattage bulbs in this too. I could use a 500w / 1k Jem Ball over the top of them if this happens, but I kind of like it being easier to set up the wide only using the practicals & then with my MIDS coming in with a soft source for their faces (granted I am only getting 1 wide but still saves me putting up this giant light up top). Let me please know your thoughts. Would this be enough with these 5w bulbs? Should I get a bunch of 20/40 watts instead? Should I fill in the 5watts with a bigger light up top out of frame? Anyone who has done something similar before I would really appreciate the feedback. I am using the RED Epic Dragon to film. Thanks!
  4. Hey all! Newer to the forums here. I'm shooting a senior thesis project coming up next weekend, and like any student project I'm trying to always up my game to the next level. We're shooting a lot of daylight exteriors, and I plan on setting up a lot of 10x's with diff to just get some more control of the light and to keep it consistently soft on close ups. My understanding of the workflow between G&E is still growing, and I was wondering what the gaffers role would be on a daylight exterior scene? It feels to me more like we would only need a KG on a day that we're just flagging, rather than creating light. Wondering if anyone could elaborate more on this.
  5. Hello all, this is my first post here and I really need some advice on how to go about that! I have a project coming up which involves interior and exterior shots. My main concern is lighting the outdoors night scenes. The scene involves two actors having a dialogue while they go about dumping a body in a car. This takes place at night. Mood: Dark as possible - its is a murder after all, mysterious. The only source of light is kind of a Sodium Light high up on the wall next to them which is pretty strong if they stand on its range. (and some other lights in the distant background which only offer some perspective) eventually they will sit next to each other (some other shots involve them standing almost under the sodium light talking - but these ones are the widest ones and obviously the biggest worry for me since I need to light from further away) My initial thought is to keep it as simple as possible and try to utilise what I have as much as possible. I can always try to match the sodium light for the interior shoots as it supposedly shinning through the window-> using half orange and +green or even a dedicated gel. But now I am left with trying to light up their faces and at the same time trying to make them look natural, I can budget some diva kinoflos and pretend that there are some other street lamps around of a different color temperature(or even match it), but I am worried it might not look as natural as i want and that it might sort of spill all over the place and destroy the mood. The camera is an Arri Alexa with a kit of prime lenses. This is working in my favour so I cant complaint I just need to sort out my lighting kit list soon and these scenes do trouble me since its the first time I am lighting an outdoor night scene. Much appreciated in advance any advice is welcome! thanks!
  6. Good day, For a low budget short I will have many day exterior scenes (in moving and parked car and on the street) where I initially thought using only scrims, reflectors and negative fill, because I was afraid adding light would slow us down too much. But we are in winter and being in the mountains the weather (and light) can change very dramaticaly in very little time so I thought that if I took only one single but very powerful artificial source it could not slow us down so much and would up the results noteably. I figure a 6 or 8K would fit every shot (as I can always bring down it's power, but I obviously cannot raise the light of a smaller source) and we would not have to rent more fixtures. (less fixtures, fewer people to physically manage the light, fewer generators, smaller truck, faster shooting) Let's suppose physical space is not a matter: if I need the light it "lower" I could simply move the source further away before it hits the 8x8 diffusion. But: Is there something I miss? Is this (less fixtures ... faster shooting) a "valid formula" without overly compromising the result? (We will shoot on SRIII, Super16, Vision3 200T) Thank you in advance for any advice or shared experiences!
  7. Hi, I have a couple of questions that I'd greatly appreciate any help or advice with regarding shooting with natural light. For an upcoming shoot, one of the scenes written is set on a beach and involves a simple conversation between two characters. The director would like it to be shot in overcast weather - he'd like it to look grey, miserable and "flat", but in an aesthetically pleasing (cinematic?) way. I'm concerned that shooting in overcast weather won't look good, and would love anyones input on how to go about this, or examples of films that have managed it well? The area I am least knowledgable about is in using light modifiers such as flags/bounce boards/etc. Obviously the success of the shoot depends largely on the weather itself - something I can't control! Are there any particular shooting conditions that you would recommend for good results? (ie. is it better to shoot with clear skies and use diffusion/flags etc in a particular way, or shoot in overcast conditions? Using artificial light sources is a possibility but ideally we'd like to stick with natural light only. All the best, Connor
  8. Starting a feature this week and the director wants a very "yellow springtime" look to our lighting. Mostly the highlights. Attached is a photo and isn't the best because the female is blonde as is probably natural backlight but this is the the rough tone. So my question is: to get that warm almost sunset color without getting too red/orange, has anybody played with more yellow color correction on daylight lit scenes? So on our HMI's instead of adding CTS or CTO for a little end of day glow playing more with yellows. I've but aside (from LEE) 100 Spring Yellow 767 Oklahoma Yellow 101 Yellow 102 Light Amber 104 Deep Amber Has anybody played with these colors on bigger sources? (18kHMI / 6kHMI) I like the look of 100 Spring Yellow but am afraid will start to feel green when blasting with a big unit.
  9. Hey everyone, new member here :) I have a few night night exterior scenes at a high school football field. Guy/girl sneak onto the field, at at some point ends up proposing to her. We want to use the existing stadium lights "only" look. Of course I'll add some units on the floor to do the talent justice (end of the film/ romantic) but I was wondering if anyone has worked with just existing stadium lights as the primary source? Seems pretty straight forward but was curious about people's experience/ any issues with these types of lights. Attached is a photo not of the actual location, but something i found to give an idea. (3towers on each side of field)
  10. I am DPing a music video in the near future that will be shot entirely at night in a forest. The concept is to have an industrial yet gothic feeling rave taking place in the forest with numerous people dancing and milling around. We are going for a very abstract and neon look, reminiscent of "Only God Forgives". Saturated colours are important and it's not important to have a sense of realism with moonlight or anything. I am hoping to light the scenes with Arri M18 1800W HMIs and KinoFlo 4 banks as well as various practicals in the form of industrial fluorescent lights and festoon lights. The practicals will be gelled red and yellow and dotted about the clearing. I am planning on rigging the HMIs above the clearing on our tallest stands as the budget doesn't allow for a condor or similar. I am hoping this will give a nice toplight and was wondering what I should be diffusing these with? I will bring in the Kinos with egg crate and diffusion for close ups and may also use small battery powered LED panels for background interest and tight spots. I would just appreciate any general advice or suggestions on this.
  11. Hey guys, I'm looking for a bit of advice, stock-wise. We're shooting the first ten minutes of our feature film this month and unfortunately my DP is as unfamiliar with film as I am. For outdoor scenes, I'm looking into the KODAK Vision 3 250D. One shot in particular, we transition from the roof of our building to the inside of our apartment. I dug up an article on Fuji's old 250. The tester claimed it would work very well under such a transition. I'm assuming that Kodak can achieve the same result? http://www.fujifilm.com/products/motion_picture/lineup/eterna_vivid250d/demo/ what would you recommend, lighting-wise, once we hit the interior. In the same one-shot, we travel quite aways around the apartment. Sometimes, windows are plentiful, sometimes not so much. for everything else, I thought we could use kodak 500t. but I don't know how that would match up either. does anyone know if I'm looking in the right places? if not, can you point me in the right direction. (i also considered throwing an 85 on something like a 200t to achieve the same effect, but I'm new at this, and I don't really know what I'm talking about) thank you for your help, for more information on our movie check us out at po.st/sowhat
  12. Hi, I'm going to shoot a mini-documentary divied in 2 scenes. I think I will use quartz lights: 1x 1K, 2x 650 (Lilliput). 1) the first scene is an interior/day on a irish pub. the shot is a medium close shot and a medium close up (like an interview). I would like to mix a daylight coming from the open door, the practicals light, and a backlight to separate the subject. How can I simulate a daylight with a quartz (I guess the natural light is not enough, the pub is pretty dark)? I'd use the 1k outside and near to the door, gel it with ful CTB (so it's 5500) and a frost to get a soft light. then I'd use the 650 as fill light without any gel but at 3200K and the other 650 (I don't know with which gel) to get a hairlight. I don't want hard light on the subject's face. 2) the second scene is an exterior/day. Do I have to match the 1K with the natural light or not? is a frost gel enough to mix artificial light with natural light? I'd like a very soft light, I don't to create a sunlight effect. in this case I can use a hairlight? I'd like hear your advices and opinion about the setup I described. Thank you, William
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