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Non reflex camera


Pavan Deep
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I've been out filming with a non reflex camera, the Cine Kodak K100, the gate was machined for a wider Super 16 image, measuring and guessing  distances for focusing was nerve racking, but it worked. It's truly an amazing camera which is seriously "underrated", there were no light leaks the images are incredibly steady and the camera runs very quietly.

https://vimeo.com/708706363

Pav

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Quality looks very good Pav. Amazing when you think it's so old.  Never used a K100 myself, super-16 a real bonus. I guess being non-reflex you had to be extra careful for the framing in this disturbing little drama.

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Pavan,

You probably already know this, but in case you don't, there is a way to turn your camera into, (I believe it's called) an "aerial image" reflex system by using a c-mount "c-cup" adapter fitted to, usually, Angenieux lenses, i.e.  12 to 120,   9.5 to 57,   12 to 240. Others work as well.   Again, in case this is unfamiliar, first check out on ebay: seller:  padmavat_enterprise item #  184610003906  to see what a "C-cup" looks like.  (It's fitted to a very beat up cp-16). 

Next: check out seller:  kinemaman  item#:  313796845848  to see a 12 to 240  with the long "dogleg."  That 12-240 was used by some network news crews back in the day (tripod mounted), and college football shooters also used it mated to the detachable magazine kodak spring wound camera (I have forgotten model name/type). (Kept an assistant in the dark bag for the entire game changing out 100' loads).  

By typing in:  Angenieux lens  on ebay  you will find several lenses with short "dog legs" and even a K-100 with a Bell and Howell "dog leg" Zoom lens.  I believe the longer "dog leg" will work better for your situation assuming that these lenses will cover Super 16.  The 12 to 240 shown was designed to work on Auricon type cameras with the viewfinder rotating up out of the way to allow side door opening for threading the camera.  It will require some "finessing"  to get the frame leveled and viewfinder running along the side, but others more technically experienced can address that and adjusting flange focal depth etc.  They may also suggest mounting a lens support system for the longer lens although I can't recall the network guys using them. 

The biggest drawback to that system is there is a dark spot in the center where the iris darkens it for f-stop setting.  But since that was my introduction to film cameras, I quickly got used to it.

If short focal lengths are acceptable, the 9.5 to 57 can be a super little lens to film with.  

The 12 to 120 was basically standard and the 12 to 240 enlisted for working at a distance; Some Political Events and Sports, etc.

Under the Angenieux lens listing you will see an old B&H 70 model with a zoom attached to it.  Check out the movie Bob and Carol, Ted and Alice where Robert Culp fields one filming a party.  The movie was good and the story line was controversial for that time in American film history.

Hope this will be of some help to you.

 

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Thank you both, I discovered that working with a non reflex isn't that hard, you do rely on 'gut'  instinct and you keep in mind the slight parallax error, so what you see in the viewfinder won't always match what you're filming and you do have to adjust and guess for that. You know everything will be in focus when we measure and when there's plenty of light and when using wider lenses and  a 25mm lens things are easier. I do have a dogleg lens; the Angeniuex 17-68mm, but on this occasion I didn’t use it, it's a great lens but I think the 25mm Switar is sharper and much smaller making everything neat and compact, my only regret is I didn’t use a tripod.

Pav

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Hi Pav, this short film looks great to me. I'm very biased, but it's true for me that real film instantly makes a project so much more interesting right off the bat. I find the look just more artistic. Isn't that a good thing?

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Pav, in this movie I don't think tripod would be better?  As handheld gives a sense of tension and perhaps being watched.  But maybe slightly more stable would have helped.

Agree a dogleg can slow things down sometimes, and with small primes you can get a reasonably accurate frame, also 250D film  gives good depth of field.   Pity the closeup of paper is overexposed.

 

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