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Gregory Irwin

Premium Member
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About Gregory Irwin

  • Birthday September 21

Profile Information

  • Occupation
    1st Assistant Camera
  • Location
    Work is based out of Los Angeles but I live elsewhere.
  • My Gear
    Panavision, Arriflex, IMAX, Sony
  • Specialties
    Greg is a veteran first assistant cameraman who specializes in feature film production based in Hollywood, California. His experience spans over 40 years with numerous major studio, feature length motion pictures that are recognized world-wide. He is a member of the International Cinematographers Guild and The Society of Camera Operators.

    In 1989, Greg founded and still leads Latitude 33 Motion Picture Services, LLC that provides motion picture camera technology and related services to the motion picture industry. Clients include Universal Pictures, Warner Bros., Paramount Pictures, Disney, DreamWorks, HBO, CBS, Sony, as well as Panavision, Otto Nemenz, INT and Keslow Camera.

    In 2016, The Society of Camera Operators honored Greg with their Lifetime Achievement Award for extraordinary service as a camera technician. The tribute video can be viewed on the "About Me" tab of this profile.

    Greg is happily married to his beloved wife, Rosie, and has two beautiful daughters, an incredible son-in-law and three wonderful grandchildren.

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0410389/

Recent Profile Visitors

36065 profile views
  1. I was the First AC on the very first US production with the Penelope back in 2009 with Hoyte on THE FIGHTER. The A camera operator, Geoff Haley and I were extremely unimpressed with the camera. For its size, it was very heavy. The viewing system was dark as was the video tap. There was very little real estate on the camera body for us to attach the needed accessories to turn it into a “Hollywood feature film” camera. The other drawback was the co-axial magazines. We were a steadicam movie. Unless the steadicam operator had the control box that allows for re-balancing while rolling, like Geoff had, you would quickly be out of balance side to side during a take. Speaking about the camera’s balance, we had to hang an on board monitor off of the back of the camera in order to achieve better balance when hand held. Finally, we were surprised that the camera was not that quiet when compared to other silent film camera choices. I’m sure that there is a market for this camera (somewhere) but it’s not a good choice for narrative filmmaking. G
  2. Mark is spot on. 100% the shutter is out of sync with the movement. That is what created the image streaking vertically. If it was a pressure plate issue, your footage would be drifting in and out of focus. G
  3. You’re welcome and you are correct! G
  4. All good Tyler! Thank you! I’ll be in LA soon to start my next movie. It’ll be hard to be away from my family yet again! Hope you’re doing well too! G
  5. I would say the old school non monitor method Tyler. The quality of the film HD taps are not good enough to pull critically off of a monitor. They really never materialized as we had hoped. G
  6. Monitor focus pulling is a different skill set from traditional focus pulling that requires patience and practice to master. For me, after over 3 decades of film focus pulling, I successfully have made that transition. It offers me many more opportunities to help tell the story via focus. Focus pulling is no longer a technical process but now a creative one. I love that. I sit quietly in my chair, away from set, with my Small HD 1303 monitor in front of me, my Preston handset mounted to the monitor stand and a Comtek in my ear so I can hear the dialogue. This allows me to “watch” the movie and make story telling decisions in real time on how and where to play the focus so it maximizes the effectiveness of the shot. It’s almost like a video game! The point is, I can see focus opportunities that I wouldn’t see if I was standing next to the camera pulling in the traditional way. Finally, since I can see my work as it happens, I don’t worry about if I got the shot in focus or not. I can guarantee my work with confidence right then and there. G
  7. How much? Is the pin a Preston connector? Thanks! G
  8. In my opinion, there are no rules. Look at my lens package from JOKER. we had a total Frankenstein set and we earned an Oscar nomination for Cinematography! G
  9. Hi! I would simply measure from your subject (the singer?) and place strips of tape on the floor. Make them small if the camera is going to see them on the wide. As the camera’s sensor plane passes over your marks you set the focus accordingly. I recommend taping a thin line of brightly colored tape on the camera so you can see the sensor plane on the camera. Also, don’t place too many marks. You’ll get confused. Maybe go from 10 feet, 5 feet and 2 feet if you’re that close in the end. You can choose what distances make sense to you. Anything beyond 10 feet, you’ll have the DOF to help you out on a 25mm lens. Feel the rhythm of the camera move and turn that knob!! 😁 KEEP IT SIMPLE!!! G
  10. I believe that education is important whether it’s film school or otherwise. I went a little crazy in college earning a degree in cinema and ultimately, 3 business degrees. The business degrees really paid off for my long motion picture career. G
  11. Thanks Dom! I appreciate you. This is for a young filmmaker who just purchased one and was asking me about it. I’ll pass on your info! G
  12. Hi all… Does anyone know who and where one can have a spring wound, Bolex reflex camera converted from standard 16mm to super 16? Many thanks! G
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