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aapo lettinen

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  1. This is simulated serial data output from the CP16R controller. The exact detail may change but it will include the battery voltage and counter information like you see in the image. The controller itself does not have any display but it has a simple Arduino compatible Serial Data output and one can easily program an Arduino to view the data even if never having previously used Arduinos. I am providing the necessary Arduino code for this application free of charge so the user does not have to code anything, just get an Arduino and a suitable oled display and load the code to the Arduino, then connect the display to it and connect the Arduino to the Crystal Controller 's data output using a 9-pin d-connector and two wires (data and ground wires) between the Arduino and the Crystal Controller. If necessary, I can purchase a suitable Arduino and display for you and upload the code to the Arduino so that you only have to connect the wires and power to the Arduino to get it working and showing information. You can get suitable Arduino compatible boards for very cheap, I think the cheapest working complete solution would be less than 20 USD total including the board, display, wires and connectors. The reason for leaving the display out from the CP16R Crystal Controller Box was because it needs lots more coding and machining and an additional microcontroller to run the display and a separate circuit board if the display needs to be built in inside the Controller box (additionally having the issue of fitting the extra board inside the already small control box). This would have made the controller way too expensive which would have been very counterintuitive because the whole idea of this External Controller is to be readily available and affordable. But it is good to know that you can very easily add your own display to the CP16R external control box if you will need it! Just get an Arduino, upload the readily made code to it and connect the wires and you should get it working right away 🙂
  2. This is simulated serial data output from the CP16R controller. The exact detail may change but it will include the battery voltage and counter information like you see in the image. The controller itself does not have any display but it has a simple Arduino compatible Serial Data output and one can easily program an Arduino to view the data even if never having previously used Arduinos. I am providing the necessary Arduino code for this application free of charge so the user does not have to code anything, just get an Arduino and a suitable oled display and load the code to the Arduino, then connect the display to it and connect the Arduino to the Crystal Controller 's data output using a 9-pin d-connector and two wires (data and ground wires) between the Arduino and the Crystal Controller. If necessary, I can purchase a suitable Arduino and display for you and upload the code to the Arduino so that you only have to connect the wires and power to the Arduino to get it working and showing information. You can get suitable Arduino compatible boards for very cheap, I think the cheapest working complete solution would be less than 20 USD total including the board, display, wires and connectors. The reason for leaving the display out from the CP16R Crystal Controller Box was because it needs lots more coding and machining and an additional microcontroller to run the display and a separate circuit board if the display needs to be built in inside the Controller box (additionally having the issue of fitting the extra board inside the already small control box). This would have made the controller way too expensive which would have been very counterintuitive because the whole idea of this External Controller is to be readily available and affordable. But it is good to know that you can very easily add your own display to the CP16R external control box if you will need it! Just get an Arduino, upload the readily made code to it and connect the wires and you should get it working right away 🙂
  3. Both the Konvas 15EPSS controller and the CP16R controller have a simple Serial Data output which can be read very easily using an Arduino to show it on a display. I am providing the necessary Arduino code for this application free of charge so you don't need to code anything, just upload the readily made code to the Arduino, connect the oled display to it and connect the two necessary wires between the Arduino and the 9-pin D-connector on the Crystal Controller and it should work correctly right away. ----------------- Here I am simulating the data output of the Konvas 15EPSS controller using an Arduino Micro and reading the data using an Arduino Uno, printing the data to a 0.96" OLED display. It is very easy to make a additional display device to the Crystal Controllers by yourself this way and that is why I decided not to include a display to the CP16R controller: it is so easy to make a external display to it by yourself that a internal display is not needed at all. The idea of this data output is that you can get the necessary display information to another display or a computer some distance away using only two wires and very easily without needing to code anything. As you can see, all the necessary footage counter information is visible as well as the battery voltage and the approximate crystal frequency set 🙂
  4. I am testing the suitable format for the Serial Data output by using an Arduino Micro for transmitting serial data in the same format and Arduino Uno for reading the data and printing it to the small oled display. You can see the two wires connecting the Arduino boards together: the orange one is the data line carrying all the information and the pink is the ground wire. It is this easy to read the Serial Data from the Konvas 15EPSS controller and show it on a small Oled display: Install Arduino IDE to your computer and the two Adafruit libraries which control a 1306 oled display. You will need the Arduino, the 128x64 oled display which uses the 1306 driver and some wires to connect them together. I will provide the basic Arduino code needed to read the serial data and to display it so you don't need to code anything, just upload the program to the Arduino by yourself and that's it. Or if you want, I can purchase a Arduino board here and upload the program to it for you so that you only need to connect the wires to get it working. there is a 9-pin D-connector on the side of the 15EPSS controller and one needs to connect two wires to it: one to the serial data output and one to the gnd(ground). Connect theses wires to your Arduino board (the GND to the GND pin and the Serial data output to the RX pin on the Arduino). Power up the 15epss controller and the Arduino (you can use for example a usb power bank to power the Arduino) and it should work correctly, showing this information on the screen. No need to change any code or anything 🙂 The idea of this data output is that you can get the necessary display information to another display or a computer some distance away using only two wires and very easily without needing to code anything. As you can see, all the necessary footage counter information is visible as well as the battery voltage and the approximate crystal frequency set 🙂
  5. the general issue is that general public and the press get all their "information" about the film industry working practices and conditions from the marketing material the production companies and distributors publish, they don't get any unbiased information from anywhere ... there is no reliable information available at all and thus the new persons considering film career think that the working conditions are like this pink hollywood dreamlike summer camp image the marketing materials try to sell. People make their first production thinking that the disappointment would be an exception and it would get better in the next one. Well it will NOT and after working on three or four productions they give up and will find other work. It is quite an issue here in Finland actually because there is not enough basic crew in the tv-series shoots and movie productions because the new-ish people are driven away by this steep difference between their expectations (which they got from the marketing materials like making ofs and such) and the reality of actually working on set. For me the biggest issue has been that DIT work is rarely appreciated or understood here and people often seem to think that I am just "some lazy runner who only shows up half an hour before the wrap, loitering around and eating all the good stuff from the catering table without doing anything useful like the rest of us or the real runners do". It seems to be pretty impossible to explain to them what I do on the set and where all the day's materials go after everyone else wraps so that they will be safely backed up and how the dailies magically appear in the frame.io after each shooting day. So I would avoid crew positions where you are treated like a "stupid machine which does not quite work correctly all the time" and instead concentrate on positions where you can get close to the set and work with the crew most of the day every day. I would actually rather do runner work nowadays instead of DIT work if I got to choose, it is much more fun to be a runner and people actually appreciate your work then and you even get to sleep at night after the shooting days 🙂
  6. AND like mentioned before, I will wait to get at least 4 of these external CP16R controllers sold before making any further designs for the CP16R. It is kind of a market test as well: I will need to see how well this simpler controller is accepted before continuing the much more complicated and expensive internal modifications for the camera. If it does not go as planned, I am perfectly happy using the external box version with my own cameras and in that case I would have saved lots of money and time from the further modifications in the case no one would have ordered them anyway and they would have gone to waste 😄
  7. The current design of the CP16R external box controller has a film end warning system which gives an audible warning when the preset film amount runs out. The film amount is selected using a 12-position rotary switch (just a coincidence because they are the only switches I have available at the moment). This gives the possibility to select the film amount in 10 meter intervals so that it is easy to use short ends with the system. Turning the film amount selector to "0" position resets the counter so that one can change the magazine and choose a different film amount for it. I will add a 9-pin accessory connector to the control box so that it is possible to output the following signals from it to external devices to add lots of extra functions if needed: - crystal reference frequency (shows the exact framerate preset the system is set on at the moment) - serial output 9600 baud if I get it working correctly (the serial data contains film counter information and can be used for extrenal footage counters, reading it using a computer, etc.) - motor encoder signal (speed sensor signal) output (shows the exact framerate the motor is currently running ) - open collector output to control audio recorder start-stop etc. devices when the camera is started. Comparable to a switch which closes momentarily when the camera motor is started or stopped - start-stop switch connection to add more start-stop switches if needed (one can control the start-stop with electrical devices like Arduino too if taking the time to figure it out) - unregulated power output for external devices which consume very little power and which have their own voltage regulator. Couple of hundred mA can be taken out from the connector. (It is easy to cause damage to the system if making a wrong connection to this pin so extreme care is needed when using this) The accessory port signals are extremely useful for persons who want to develop their own accessories for the system or if wanting to add a display or other accessories later (I can develop accessories too if needed). There is a catch though: it is relatively easy to cause a short circuit and destroy something if making a wrong connection to the accessory port so extreme care is required when tinkering with this extra connector and I recommend using correct metering and oscilloscope to double check the connections before using them 🙂 I WILL WAIT TO GET AT LEAST 4 OF THESE CP16R CONTROLLERS SOLD BEFORE MAKING ANY FURTHER SYSTEMS FOR THE CP16R. The external box system is available for order now and I will post material of the prototype when getting it fully finished.
  8. The current design of the CP16R external box controller has a film end warning system which gives an audible warning when the preset film amount runs out. The film amount is selected using a 12-position rotary switch (just a coincidence because they are the only switches I have available at the moment). This gives the possibility to select the film amount in 10 meter intervals so that it is easy to use short ends with the system. Turning the film amount selector to "0" position resets the counter so that one can change the magazine and choose a different film amount for it. I will add a 9-pin accessory connector to the control box so that it is possible to output the following signals from it to external devices to add lots of extra functions if needed: - crystal reference frequency (shows the exact framerate preset the system is set on at the moment) - serial output 9600 baud if I get it working correctly (the serial data contains film counter information and can be used for extrenal footage counters, reading it using a computer, etc.) - motor encoder signal (speed sensor signal) output (shows the exact framerate the motor is currently running ) - open collector output to control audio recorder start-stop etc. devices when the camera is started. Comparable to a switch which closes momentarily when the camera motor is started or stopped - start-stop switch connection to add more start-stop switches if needed (one can control the start-stop with electrical devices like Arduino too if taking the time to figure it out) - unregulated power output for external devices which consume very little power and which have their own voltage regulator. Couple of hundred mA can be taken out from the connector. (It is easy to cause damage to the system if making a wrong connection to this pin so extreme care is needed when using this) The accessory port signals are extremely useful for persons who want to develop their own accessories for the system or if wanting to add a display or other accessories later (I can develop accessories too if needed). There is a catch though: it is relatively easy to cause a short circuit and destroy something if making a wrong connection to the accessory port so extreme care is required when tinkering with this extra connector and I recommend using correct metering and oscilloscope to double check the connections before using them 🙂
  9. Design locked for the one control box I am finishing this month and which will be available for purchase in February. it will have the same framerate presets than the v1.0 seen in the photos and videos I posted but in the place of the 40.00fps preset there will be a 33.333fps preset. The Quick Select speeds will be the same (varispeed, 22.01fps, 24.00fps, 30.00fps, 48.00fps) and the firmware updated to the v1.2 version which has the possibility to save counters to the internal memory so that they are automatically called on startup and which has the possibility to set predetermine take lengths after which the camera will automatically stop (for example for shooting exactly 16ft or 20ft takes all the time if needed to save film in situations where one needs approximately fixed length shots) . Let me know if wanting to order this version, I'll have one available in February. Additionally I have one extra Konvas motor and camera if anyone is interested purchasing a modified motor or a motor with a 1M camera body and mags. The motor and camera have the less common 4-teeth rubber connector on the motor axle. If selling the motor or motor+camera I would be able to purchase another camera+motor kit from ebay and modify it later in Spring to sell it too fully modified and ready to use (just add lenses). just a thought if anyone is interested in this possibility 🙂
  10. Design locked for the one control box I am finishing this month and which will be available for purchase in February. it will have the same framerate presets than the v1.0 seen in the photos and videos I posted but in the place of the 40.00fps preset there will be a 33.333fps preset. The Quick Select speeds will be the same (varispeed, 22.01fps, 24.00fps, 30.00fps, 48.00fps) and the firmware updated to the v1.2 version which has the possibility to save counters to the internal memory so that they are automatically called on startup and which has the possibility to set predetermine take lengths after which the camera will automatically stop (for example for shooting exactly 16ft or 20ft takes all the time if needed to save film in situations where one needs approximately fixed length shots) . Let me know if wanting to order this version, I'll have one available in February. Additionally I have one extra Konvas motor and camera if anyone is interested purchasing a modified motor or a motor with a 1M camera body and mags. The motor and camera have the less common 4-teeth rubber connector on the motor axle. If selling the motor or motor+camera I would be able to purchase another camera+motor kit from ebay and modify it later in Spring to sell it too fully modified and ready to use (just add lenses). just a thought if anyone is interested in this possibility 🙂
  11. making a completely new project may sometimes help. but not always. The issue may have something to do with the previously imported media having been offline at some point and being linked again. that might confuse the program I think, especially if some of the media stays offline during editing
  12. yes Google knows a lot about the waveform issues of Resolve. I have used Resolve for work pretty much every day for the past 8 years and have had countless reliability issues with it, inluding ones which cannot be resolved in any way like the audio waveform visibility on certain random computers. Meaning that when the program decides not to show them, you may not see them EVER again no matter what you do and how much you try to change the settings or reinstall everything or clear caches or change them. It shows just a blank grey line in place of the waveforms and that's it. turning waveforms on and off just turns the grey line on and off, it does not revive any waveforms back to life. By my experience they changed something after the version 14 and the waveforms haven't worked correctly ever since on certain computers. It is probable that it just does not like certain computers for reasons unknown and refuses to work correctly even if you reinstall the operating system and all the programs. might have something to do with the cache though updating and resetting cache settings does not help on my computers. I first though it would be a mac vs pc issue but the pc laptop does not show waveforms either and it is not source format dependent either. ----- It is the same thing with people claiming that Blackmagic cameras or Premiere Pro are "absolutely reliable because I have never had an issue with them in my life". I have personally seen and used faulty and unreliable Blackmagic cameras and have had Premiere crashing and ruining stuff for the past almost 20 years so I can tell for sure they are not "absolutely reliable" and that they CAN fail you when you least expect it.
  13. I am using the paid version too. does not help at all. It is based on pure luck if you happen to see the waveforms or not. You can for example see them for the first 5 minutes when editing and then they suddenly disappear and never come back whatever you do (you may even start a new project and does not help) . this is a common known issue with the Resolve and they haven't been able to fix it in years
  14. davinci resolve has traditionally had problems showing audio waveforms in the timeline which makes it a living hell to edit serious projects with it. but silent projects work perfectly fine and sound editing MAY sometimes work correctly if the waveforms happen to show up 🙂
  15. The current design of the external box system includes a simple footage counter which gives a warning signal when the predetermined footage length has been shot. The current design has the open collector output for persons who want to control external devices with the system. Additionally I am investigating the possibility to add a 9600 baud serial output to the film counter circuit so that it would be possible to read the film counter values from the accessory output connector using an Arduino or a usb to serial adapter. This is dependent on how much I have spare program memory in the film counter microcontroller to include serial data functions but because the film counter code uses eeprom for saving values, I need to use serial connection in the developing phase anyway to verify it is using the memory correctly and if I have enough memory for it, I don't have to turn the serial out off when the code developing is finished, I can just leave it on and route it to the accessory connector so that it could be used for external devices like connecting a purchased or DIY film counter with a display to the system later or reading the counter values from a computer, even continuously when the camera is running
  16. you could purchase a Chinese voltage meter module (prices starting from 2 bucks I think) and solder it to a 4-pin xlr connector also available cheaply. then you would have a xlr voltage meter which you can just connect to the batteries to see how much voltage they have. https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=led+voltage+meter&_sacat=0&_sop=15
  17. This is the first mockup version of the controller I am making for the CP16R camera. It is a external 12-speed crystal sync controller which is connected to the camera via a special cable and enables using the CP16R cameras which have broken original electronics. Only the original camera motor itself is needed, the rest of the electronics are replaced by my modification. - framerate presets as seen in the picture - no shutter parking but one can use the 3fps inching speed to reach correct mirror position - external start-stop switch with cable included - possibility to extract start-stop signal from the controller to control external devices - possibility to extract the crystal speed signal from the controller to control external devices - film end warning most likely included. I am just testing this feature at the moment how well it integrates with the system I am planning on making a single batch of these in February to gain more funds for making more advanced modifications for the CP16R later on. So it is a great opportunity to get your non-working CP16R back to life for reasonable price and to support the further modifications at the same time. This modification is relatively cheap, 500 USD + shipping. It requires shipping the whole camera body to me for the modification and one gets the camera back in couple of weeks with the Crystal Controller installed. As said I am planning on making only a single batch of these in February and it is probably not going to be available after that. Please note that this is a quickly made mockup version and the final controller will have professionally printed markings. The framerate presets are the final ones and I have the circuit boards and software already finished, only the external case and control panel need more work: Please let me know ASAP if you are interested in this CP16R controller. It is only available for a limited time and I will need to assemble all the units at the same time in February so will need to know beforehand how many cameras there would be to modify then.
  18. I have couple of ongoing crystal sync controller projects which I originally intended for my own use but it would be great to be able to sell couple of finished systems to other forum members to cover the developing costs and to help others to shoot their movies better 🙂 The current models include a crystal sync modification to the Konvas 15EPSS motor which converts the motor to 24 - 30v battery and replaces the original electrically stabilized control box with my new Crystal Sync Controller. My controller design enables 16 internal Crystal Sync speeds and a Variable non-crystal speed function. I have finished one of these controllers so far (sold to the customer in the US) and two more are on the way waiting to be assembled. The current v1.2 firmware allows storing counter information to the onboard memory to save counter information when power is lost and it has couple of additional features compared to the 1.0 version, like the possibility to record pre-set take lengths to save film on certain types of shoots. The controller allows shooting up to 64fps in crystal sync with the modified Konvas 15epss motor. The framerate presets are somewhat customizable and may differ between controllers, please ask for more if wanting special framerates or other custom options 🙂 Price for the controller including the modification of customer's 15epss motor is 800USD+shipping. The images and video are of the 1.0 version, the Konvas controllers for sale are from firmware 1.2 onwards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCzQguQMv8o Please let me know if you are interested in these Konvas controllers. Ordering one requires shipping your existing 15epss motor to me for modification (installing the internal speed sensor to it and modifiying the motor to 24v use) . The work takes from 1 to 2 weeks if I have the controller box already ready for shipping. If needing to assemble a new control box it typically takes an additional 2 weeks.
  19. it would be possible to make a separate exposure compensation device which connects to the accessory port of the controller. this would be a later add-on in any case and could even be a 3rd party accessory because it is easy to extract the crystal reference signal from the accessory port to see the current crystal speed setting or the varispeed framerate setting. I don't know how useful a handcrank feature would be in the CP16R. the camera has a relatively large flywheel and relatively small motor to enable stable operation by default and unevenly running motor controlled by the handcrank would cause strain to the belt and gears even when the flywheel would stabilise these variations later in the mechanical path so that they would most likely not even show in the final image at all. so it would probably be unnecessary stress to the camera mechanics without any real benefit in the final image I think.... the Varispeed knob could be used to simulate uneven framerate of the handcrank by altering the varispeed setting during the take and this would cause less stress to the mechanics for the motor speed variations being smoother. the rapid fluctuations would not show anyway so I would avoid introducing them to save the mechanics
  20. Here is the first MOCKUP VERSION of the simple controller's front panel. Please note that this is just a mockup used to test the user interface layout and the final markings will be professionally made and will thus be different looking, high quality prints and on slightly different positions. This mockup version box is about 120mm x 80mm x 65mm and will have a cheeseplate on the backside for mounting just like on my Konvas 15EPSS controller. Again, this is a mockup and the final front panel will have high quality printed markings. But you can see the approximate user interface from this mockup which is why I wanted to post it on this early stage.
  21. the original boards don't have one but it would be possible to wire an additional open collector output from the start-stop switch. Or it would be possible to make a small additional circuit board which has a programmable detector which gives a signal either when the camera motor starts or when it has reached the target speed. The start-stop switch uses a +5V floating pin which is shorted to ground when the button is pressed. the control box will have a simple 2-wire output for external start-stop button and it would be possible to get the button press signal from that same wire to control external devices with the same button if needed, that would be a simple user modification possible to do at home because one would only need to hack the external button cable and connect to the floating wire to get a signal from there. The additional speed detector board would cost some extra but the open collector output and button wire hacks would be free because they are very easy to do.
  22. by my experience, they are not prone to jamming or loosing loop if they are loaded right and IF they are put together correctly meaning that for example the sprocket drive is mounted in a correct position and adjusted right
  23. the Krasnogorsks are not very well made cameras in general and seemingly only meant for intermittent use shooting low amounts of film like couple of rolls every now and then. by my opinion, the biggest issue with them is the quality and construction of the internal mechanics like bearings and gears... if one takes those cameras apart one sees immediately that it is not meant for shooting a feature film or anything, the bearings would never make it without turning to dust and one would virtually need to take it apart every shooting day to adjust and lubricate it for it to make through the project without breaking apart. That is why I gave up making modifications for the camera, it is just not worth it because one can't manufacture dozens of new higher quality mechanical parts to make it durable enough to shoot longer sync sound projects with it. the lenses are the best part of the camera by my opinion and the mirror is pretty neat as well. The film transport is just too cheap for most serious projects by my opinion and if it happens to work well now, the is no guarantee that it would not fail you tomorrow when you least expect it 🙂
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