Jump to content

Fabrice Ducouret

Basic Member
  • Content Count

    14
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Fabrice Ducouret

  • Rank

  • Birthday 03/15/1981

Profile Information

  • Occupation
    Other
  • Location
    Paris, France
  • My Gear
    I own over 50 cameras (Super-8, 16mm, 35mm, Video, digital...)
  • Specialties
    I am a filmmaker and director of photography who also takes pictures and draws. I have directed over 160 short films since my youngest age in the 1980s, until now, in various genres and formats.
    I also build or tweak lenses to obtain surreal or ethereal effects. Some of my photographic inventions are listed on my website, contact me for ideas and any kind of project.

    My showreel (feedback is always appreciated!): https://vimeo.com/110965369

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.fabulousrice.com

Recent Profile Visitors

2353 profile views
  1. I'd be curious to know what the stretch factor on McTiernan's anamorphics usually is.
  2. As a project to create a lens within a 3D program, I would love to create a physically accurate (single focus, i.e. cooke, hawk etc) anamorphic lens to play with it in the 3D space. Are there diagrams for single-focus anamorphic lenses that are openly available? It would also be interesting for me as I would love to understand better how they work.
  3. This is dope - I want to try as soon as I get home!
  4. I will make some anamorphic tests with a Sankor 16D and Super-8 Cameras soon (Canon 310XL, Bauer) - and will let you know!
  5. Does anyone know if Zone Plate has ever been used in cinematography? I understand that, quite like pinhole, it can require long exposure times, however, that doesn't rule out high speed film or frame-by-frame/stop motion/landscapes. I'd be curious to know if it has been done or is being done and how the obvious challenges were overcome.
  6. Thank you very much David! Very humbled to have an answer from you :)
  7. I watched Polanski's "Cul-de-Sac" yesterday, and thought that the black and white cinematography was incredible. I am wondering what type of gradient filters were used for what seemed to be "day-for-night" scenes in which the actors are sometimes black silhouettes when they are under the dark part of the filter, and then bright again when they are on the transparent part. I have some gradient filters, but the "dark" part isn't very dark.
  8. Hello I have recently released my showreel as a cinematographer and director of photography, and I would love to have some feedback from you. You can see it here: Thank you very much!
  9. Hello, I have a question that applies both to still photography as it does to cinematography, I hope I will not get banned for that! As a cinematographer, I find hard to differentiate the two, as I use my photographic work a lot, as an inspiration and experimental playground in my cinematography work. Currently, I am wondering what are the best ways to find a fisheye accessory or get a fisheye lens for a very low price. The goal is to fit in a lot of landscape, and get distortion effects on faces or other subjects. I realize that usually these lenses or add-ons are expensive because they are made with a lot of polished glass that costs money to manufacture. However, I am wondering if over the years some older lenses or accessories become cheaper in second-hand stores. I am trying to attach the lens: -either to "old-school" manual lenses (for still cameras such as Pentax MX, Minolta X-300, Olympus Pen F, Pentacon SIX TL, Canon) for photo work/research; -or to Super-8 cameras (Canon 310 XL, Bauer C105 or C107) for film work; -or to more recent digital bodies (Canon EOS rebel, Sony NEX 3) for digital film work. The lens has to be as fisheye as possible and full-frame if possible! The closest I've been (and cheapest) was a TV Zoom Lens someone sold me for 5 euros at a rummage sale that used to be from a Canon video camcorder from the 70s, with macro functions, zoom functions, and quite wide angle. I can easily adapt it on the Sony NEX because it has a C-mount, but it requires cropping and is very bulky.
  10. Hello I've been making Super-8 and 16mm and 35mm short films most of my life as a filmmaker and DP, and for the past few years I've started moving towards digital filmmaking. At first I was using MiniDV but the quality was very cheap, so my equipment now is a Canon EOS Rebel T1i that I equip with old 1.4 lenses, and a Sony NEX 3 that I also equip with a bunch of old lenses some of which are handmade/modified lenses. My question is this : Which one is the camera that I should use the most for my films? The EOS has a 20 fps frame rate but a very large image (1920x1080) so maybe that's bad? I only have like three lenses that can go on it and the lenses I design cannot go on a camera with a mirror. Is it that bad to shoot 20 fps? I used to shoot 18 fps with super-8mm. Handheld, the images are too shaky. The NEX has a better frame rate of 30 fps but the image is 1280 x 720, although I have way more lenses for it and most of the homemade lenses I build can go on it because it is mirror less. I've had issues with the compression, though, that make it annoying to use this camera. When handheld, the images aren't too shaky though. I think maybe I should get a NEX-VG10? At the end of the day, I'd love to have a camera that's not too bulky and can shoot very good images, not too compressed, with an e-mount. Getting good sound isn't a priority. I also think it might be possible to get an external SSD recorder to plug in the HDMI of the Sony NEX, thus I would have an uncompressed image from the NEX? At the end of the day, I've used more than 80 different cameras to make my films, and I feel like the search can be endless, although I know the content is what matters more than the tool. But please let me know what you think.
  11. Hello I've been making Super-8 and 16mm and 35mm short films most of my life as a filmmaker and DP, and for the past few years I've started moving towards digital filmmaking. At first I was using MiniDV but the quality was very cheap, so my equipment now is a Canon EOS Rebel T1i that I equip with old 1.4 lenses, and a Sony NEX 3 that I also equip with a bunch of old lenses some of which are handmade/modified lenses. My question is this : Which one is the camera that I should use the most for my films? The EOS has a 20 fps frame rate but a very large image (1920x1080) so maybe that's bad? I only have like three lenses that can go on it and the lenses I design cannot go on a camera with a mirror. Is it that bad to shoot 20 fps? I used to shoot 18 fps with super-8mm. Handheld, the images are too shaky. The NEX has a better frame rate of 30 fps but the image is 1280 x 720, although I have way more lenses for it and most of the homemade lenses I build can go on it because it is mirror less. I've had issues with the compression, though, that make it annoying to use this camera. When handheld, the images aren't too shaky though. I think maybe I should get a NEX-VG10? At the end of the day, I'd love to have a camera that's not too bulky and can shoot very good images, not too compressed, with an e-mount. Getting good sound isn't a priority. I also think it might be possible to get an external SSD recorder to plug in the HDMI of the Sony NEX, thus I would have an uncompressed image from the NEX? At the end of the day, I've used more than 80 different cameras to make my films, and I feel like the search can be endless, although I know the content is what matters more than the tool. But please let me know what you think.
  12. Hey there I'm in Paris, and have a good experience with Super-8 cameras. I'll be ready to help. Let me know through my email address if you can. See you
  13. Look to have more than just one camera as the features (ranging from resistance to portability but also technical features) change drastically from a camera to another. I'd add in the brand Chinon, that the previous poster hasn't mentionned, it's very overlooked, very often their cameras were made of very strong plastic cases and had a wide array of features. Either that or Canon, some Bauer cameras are really resistant and often open to ƒ1.2. Some of the metal-cased Agfa ones are virtually unbreakable. Don't worry too much about the microphone, check in this forum if you can process sound film Super-8 at all first. And remember that switching from the DV world to the world of Super-8 will be interesting for you, but probably full of surprises, as when you have to focus each shot manually, and sometimes adjust the focusing manually during a shot (but maybe you were already doing so with manual DV cameras?). Make sure you have a tripod as some Super-8 cameras will also be weighing a ton more than small DV equipment - but again, that's a generalization, and some of my Super-8 cameras (like the Agfa Microflex who are also very resistant and reliable) probably weigh less than some big DV cameras. One last thing, if the portability/weight of the camera is an issue of capital importance for you, and you want to know what a camera looks like before you buy it, the visual encyclopedia at mondofoto.com is quite good (there is one on super8wiki.com as well, albeit less documented visually I think).
  14. Yes, the lens determines a lot of things that are not VERY difficult to understand if you know how to look online. The is no "better" or "worse" in lenses. They're all different, and they all do different things. Aperture also plays a part. You just have to ask yourself simple questions, Kevin, and not let the technical side overwhelm you as it seems it's doing. Ask yourself if you want to have depth of field or not (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_of_field), ask yourself if you need to film in low-light conditions, ask yourself these kind of questions and then if you're not sure how to do it you will be welcome to ask your questions here and for a specific result that you wish to obtain we will tell you how to do it and if you can do it given the cameras that you have. Sometimes, I have to use three, five different Super-8 cameras for the same shoot because specifications differ and allow you to do different things. But there is no "better" lens. Sometimes a lens will be said to be "faster" than another, it means more light gets inside the camera than with another lens, for example. Just ask yourself what you want to shoot, and if you run into a problem come back here for specific help. Keep in mind that Super-8 cameras were initially sold widely with the purpose of letting people shoot home movies, and then it began being used for fiction. Keep it simple, and good luck.
  15. Hello I've owned this camera and used it a lot. The green light is definitely for the battery check. The other button near the lens I can't remember what it is, I can't really visualise because the camera is at my mom's so i can't really see. I guess if you have a photo of it somewhere it could help me. Isn't it the macro switch you're talking about? Anyways, as far as the "speed" of the film I think you're confusing the speed of the film (the chemical formula that will make the film more or less reactive to light) and the rate of pictures per second (or FPS) which is the speed at which your camera is going to film (i.e., 36 fps would be slow-motion, while 9 fps would increase the speed of action). You can shoot at several speeds and thus make slow-mo shots, or else shoot at 1 fps and make animation films or timelapse. The other button, which is the one I think you say is silvery, is the timer. It only works when set on 1 fps mode with the trigger locked (maybe that's the mysterious button #2). So, my answer would be: try to lock and release the trigger with the R - L switch near the trigger. If that solves the mystery button thing, then fine. Put the FPS - frames per second - switch on 1 and lock the trigger in run mode. Now when you will switch the silvery button, the camera will click at different time intervals depending on how you set it. Basically what it does is that it takes just one image at a time, and then when you play the film at normal speed, the normal course of action is greatly sped up. It's mainly used for speeding up the way clouds move, or the sun, or the way a flower opens and closes, etc. You can search "timelapse" on super8wiki as well as wikipedia they have an entry. Be sure to use brand new batteries each time for timelapse though, and to place the camera on a tripod (and to be patient! sometimes 5 hours of filming will only reult in 5 seconds of film). Hope this helped, feel free to contact me through my profile.
×
×
  • Create New...