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Found 62 results

  1. Have to admit I'm interested in how this is coming along, even though I'm not a Star Wars fan. Greig Fraser is supposed to shoot this with the 1.25x Ultra Panavision 70 anamorphics rebuilt for The Hateful Eight. He's also shooting on film, and the Alexa 65. So are the lenses being used on 65mm, or on the Alexa 65? Will the ratio be 2.75:1? Is he shooting anything on 35 (like Episode 8 is)? Anybody heard more about it?
  2. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Angenieux-25-250MM-Zoom-F3-2-T3-9-Panavision-Mount-Arri-Bayonet-Std-Mounts-/332048432990?ssPageName=STRK:MESE:IT 1.6X Angenieux Extender available also $200 If you are here you know what you are bidding on. This was the go to zoom lens during the 70's and 80's and this particular lens has a very rich history. Starting in the early 70's this was used on The Hospital, The Gambler, Dog Day Afternoon, And Justice For All, Slap Shot, Eyes of Laura Mars, Ghost Story, Author! Author!, Without A Trace, The Big Chill, The Pope of Greenwich Village, Brighton Beach Memoirs, Eddie, and Jingle All The Way. I know this because I was the first 1st or 2nd camera assistant on most of these films. Excellent optics. PL mount can be easily made to replace the PV mount. An adapter is also available from Adorama made by MTF. See info below. If you are in the Los Angeles area you can have the lens checked out at your favorite rental house. Fiberglass shipping case in photo is included. MTF Services Ltd PL Mount Adapter With more lens options required by users of 35mm (dof) adaptors and the new generation of digital film cameras such as those by Red, the AF101, Sony F3, MTF Services Ltd will be introducing a new range of products. One of these is the Arri bayonet to Arri PL mount. Beautifully crafted in stainless steel and brass, this quick release adaptor is designed for all Arri bayonet mounted lenses and will allow you to use them on any PL mounted camera.
  3. Coming out in March 2017, directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts (The Kings Of Summer) and shot by Larry Fong, Kong: Skull Island is NOT a remake, it takes place during the 70's, and involves a scientific expedition to an uncharted island awakening titanic forces of nature, a mission of discovery becomes an explosive war between monster & man. A-list cast on board, including John Goodman, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson, Tom Hiddleston, Shea Wigham, Corey Hawkins, John C. Reilly, John Ortiz, etc, etc. First trailer from Comic Con, a few months back: QT 1080p link: http://pdl.warnerbros.com/wbol/ww/movies/kongsdcc/KONG_TRAILER_1-1080.mov Second trailer out today, with a slightly different tone: QT 1080p link: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/64705418/k2/KONG_SKULL_ISLAND_TRAILER_3-1080.mov Shot on the Alexa anamorphically, looks like Panavision lenses to me, C-series or E I'd say. Gotta say, Fong always does great work on film, but I've never seen the Alexa look this good, the texture is quite nice, I wonder if they added some grain, it's also really vibrant & beautiful.
  4. WOODLAND HILLS, CA (November 1, 2016) - Panavision, the motion picture industry's most respected designer, manufacturer and provider of state-of-the-art cinema lenses and high-precision camera systems, will showcase many of its newest offerings, including the Millennium DXL 8K Camera and T Series anamorphic lenses at the 2016 edition of the Camerimage International Film Festival, which runs Nov. 12-19 in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Panavision is also presenting two workshops, and exhibiting alongside subsidiaries Light Iron, LEE Filters and Panalux. Unveiled earlier this year, the Panavision Millennium DXL was developed through an unprecedented collaboration of three companies, bringing together large-format optics and modular accessories from Panavision; an 8K sensor from RED Digital Cinema; and new color science and optimized workflow from Light Iron. Presentations on the DXL will take place each day from Nov. 14 through Nov. 17, with demo footage screening at the MCK. The camera is expected to be available in early 2017 for rent exclusively through Panavision facilities worldwide. The company also announces the availability of the Panavision T Series anamorphic lenses. At Panavision's exhibit, attendees will see the product portfolio, ranging in current focal lengths of 35mm, 60mm, 100mm, 135mm, 150mm, and preview the upcoming additions to the lineup in 50mm, 75mm, 180mm. The lenses build on Panavision's long tradition of designing and developing high-quality anamorphic lenses for motion picture. They combine new optical layouts with mechanical advances from the G Series, but have a larger sweet spot and focus closer than some of their predecessors. They are also tuned to be compatible with digital sensors without losing any of the imaging characteristics that have become part of the anamorphic grammar. Camerimage's Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Michael Chapman, ASC will be taking the stage at the MCK on Nov. 15 at 11:00 a.m. CET. This event is a highlight of the festival, which is presented by Panavision. Oscar® nominated for his work on Raging Bull in 1981 and The Fugitive in 1994, Chapman's legacy of film images over four decades places him among the elite of cinematographers. His list of memorable credits includes The Last Detail, Taxi Driver, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Lost Boys, Rising Sun, Primal Fear, Space Jam, Six Days Seven Nights, The Story of Us, The Watcher, Evolution, and Eulogy, among many others. Following Chapman's seminar, Panavision's Cinematography Workshop will explore the technical and artistic characteristics of anamorphic and larger format optics. Led by Dan Sasaki, Panavision's VP of Optical Engineering, the workshop will be held Nov. 15 from 2:00 p.m. CET in the MCK. Also on exhibit will be the new Outpost by Panavision, a powerful mobile post-production system for on-set or near-set workflows. Originally developed by Light Iron and refined with Panavision's modular engineering, Outpost's lightweight, compact form factor provides efficient solutions for both creative tasks, such as look setting and processing tasks, including verified backups. Outpost helps creatives maximize their schedules with faster than real-time transcodes and same-day editorial deliverables, even for 8K footage. Like the DXL, Outpost is designed with many details and custom modules that can be configured to each production's needs. LEE Filters, the world's leading manufacturer of professional quality light control filters, will debut their Cine Filters, a new range of glass neutral density camera filters. Also highlighted at the exhibit will be LEE's Zircon Lighting Filters designed for LED lighting with new technology that gives them an increased lifespan of up to 200 times longer than standard lighting filters. Attendees can also pick up the latest copy of the famous LEE yellow swatch book, containing all their color effects filters as well as their full range of technical and diffusion filters for cinematography. Panalux, the leading provider of lighting rental equipment for film, television, and media production, will display their latest in LED lighting technology. The rental and service provider will showcase and demo the lightweight, battery-powered Panalux LED Flex Light and yet-to-be-released soft box accessory. The bi-color, super-slim Panalux LED Flex Light is bendable and portable. The newest accessory to the Flex Light is a quick-assemble, large-format soft box that produces a beautiful, even soft light that makes the low-consumption Flex Light even more versatile. Also on display will be the Panalux Tektile2 slimline LED panels and Panalux NessLED Kit.
  5. WOODLAND HILLS, Calif. (May 23, 2016) - Panavision, the entertainment industry's leading designer, manufacturer and rental provider of high-precision optics and camera systems, has announced the availability of PanaND filters. Representing the next-generation neutral density filters, they offer significant improvements in quality and consistency, so filmmakers can focus on achieving their creative goals. Full spectrum PanaND filters benefit from advancements in materials and manufacturing to deliver color neutrality very accurately. "Until now, cinematographers using traditional ND filters to control exposure have always had to deal with color shifting and optical performance degradation," says Haluki Sadahiro, Panavision's director of new product development. "Unlike traditional filters, PanaNDs are made with the highest quality glass and advanced coating technologies. As a result, they are truly neutral - cutting the light without altering the color temperature." PanaND filters are available in a wide range of options from 1 to 7 stops in 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, 1.8 and 2.1ND, and come in 4x5.65 and 6x6-inch sizes. The filters feature a sturdier construction and patent-pending tactile markings so users can quickly identify the depth of the ND filter in the dark. "PanaND filters are another example of Panavision's close collaboration with filmmakers that goes back 60 years," says Sadahiro. "Our focus on motion picture production allows us to better understand the needs and methods of cinematographers. Supporting them with the right tools and unparalleled service is our passion." Compatible with film and digital cameras, PanaND filters can be rented from any Panavision facility around the world. For more information, visit www.Panavision.com.
  6. Midnight Special "A father and son go on the run, pursued by the government and a cult drawn to the child's special powers." Trailer Imdb Link http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2649554/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt Director Jeff Nichols Cinematographer Adam Stone After working together on Shotgun Stories, Take Shelter and Mud, Jeff Nichols and Adam Stone got even bolder in Jeff's new movie, "Midnight Special" If you have followed Jeff Nichols' career you might have noticed that he has a thing for small sci-fi stories where there are a lot of emotions and feelings being unfold in very strange ways. Small stories, simple plots and really amazing actors are constant in Nichols' movies and "Midnight Special" has all of that which might attract a lot of people but also put aside a lot of people too. "Midnight Special's" plot is super simple, a father and a son must escape from somebody in order to bring the son to a point at an exact time and day. Now, the whys are being intercut in the story so well that when the viewer is thinking about "why is this happening?" the story tells you exactly what you need to know in order to continue being engaged by the movie. The opening sequence is one of the best opening sequences I have seen this year so far and Jeff Nichols is so smart that gives you the right amount of information in the first five minutes so you know exactly what is going on.. without the actors telling anything about it! Adam Stone's work is definitely one of the best this year, creating the right emotions for the story but super discreet and yet imaginative, building up the tone scene by scene until the end. There is nothing else to say about all the actors, Edgerton is as fantastic as always, you can feel Shannon's emotions all the way through.. and the last shot is just mind-blowing! All in all, go to the cinema and enjoy a really simple sci-fi story where the actors act really well :) Have a good day.
  7. Jane Got A Gun Trailer Imdb Link http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2140037/ "A woman asks her ex-lover for help in order to save her outlaw husband from a gang out to kill him." Director Gavin O'Connor Cinematographer Mandy Walker As a movie, "Jane Got A Gun" has a very interesting plot and a fantastic start. Natalie Portman as Jane is a great cast and she plays the role in a really great way. However, once we start to know what has happened to her and the reasons behind the "bad gang" and why they want to catch her, it becomes a very dull story. It is a pity that the screenwriters didn't spend more time portraying the ambitions and hopes of "the bad guy", played by Ewan McGregor, because we don't even get to see that he is "that bad". Although in the movie we see 4 or 5 times a banner which reminds us that he is "really bad" as he is the boss of a very dangerous gang. Other than that we don't see anything bad about him, and even his search for Jane is very well justified as in "I have some business left with you" On the other hand, Mandy Walker did her most beautiful job ever, even better than "Tracks"! Gavin and herself introduced a couple of "arty" sequences which are really well thought and the overall look of the movie is just gorgeous. Obviously she is used to shooting in really harsh environments, like "Australia" or "Tracks" but the naturalistic approach yet perfectly photographed frames on 35mm anamorphic creates the right mood for the movie. The night sequence is a little bit of a shock at the beginning being that blue, but after one second watching it you forget about the colour and you see that she made the right choice! and the blacks in the movie are so dense!!! Gavin O'Connor did a great job in the directing part and everything works super flawlessly and the interactions between the three lead characters and how they are told is first class. I suppose it really helps that he is a great director anyways! :D Definitely a movie to watch in the cinema because of the cinematography and the directing skills! Have a good day.
  8. Hey guys, I'm DP'ing a short film soon and need a little advice. I've not DP'd since exactly a year ago and have stepped away to 2nd AC and trainee in the "real world" so to speak. As such while I'm confident of my abilities on the camera side of things, my lighting experience has been limited to say the least! The script is mostly exterior - the A plot is a man in a car. I was wondering - how should I go about getting a consistent "look"? My plans at the mo are to use two HMI's and fire them at a 12x12 frame w/ two silks to create a big bounce. For closer stuff I made a reflector last year that work really well - it provided a strong eye light (a favorite of mine) while wrapping the subject in light. I've two choices of camera, the Panavision Genesis and the Arri D-21. The D-21 blowout is far more "filmic" and controllable (something I've found the Genesis not to be) but the black are far and away better on the Genesis. I have a lot of experience w/ the D-21 from past shoots, while the Genesis I've only been able to get my hands on a couple times. The D-21 can export LOG-C at 4:4:4 DPX files (no ARRIRAW), but the Genesis can only export REC-709 4:2:2 (no PANALOG), which with me being a post kinda guy is making me lean toward the D-21... but whadda you guys think? For anyone interested, here's the trailer for the short I mentioned, "Loved App" (shot with a Sony F3): If anyone's interested in seeing the full short and providing some critique, I can send the link! Thanks all!
  9. NEW YORK, Feb. 9, 2016 - Panavision is pleased to announce industry veteran Russ Robertson has joined the company as Vice President of Marketing in New York, effective immediately. He will be responsible for supporting productions in the region and consulting with filmmakers to supply the most advanced camera rental equipment available through the company's wide-ranging, globally sourced inventory. Robertson brings extensive experience to his role. He has established numerous relationships with production companies, filmmakers and studios in the industry. In addition to liaising with producers, directors, and cinematographers for the majority of his career, Robertson has implemented successful sales teams that respond to the demands of a constantly changing market and that satisfy the needs of customers so they can focus on their job of creating compelling visual stories. "Russ brings a unique blend of knowledge and capabilities to our eastern operations," said Kim Snyder, CEO and President of Panavision. "His understanding of advanced developments in complete production workflows will provide our customers with skilled advice on the latest tools. His industry expertise, along with our highly popular lenses and unique Panavised camera systems, delivers an unparalleled level of service to filmmakers working in the region." Robertson previously worked at Deluxe, where he most recently served as Senior Vice President of Sales for the East Coast. His 20-year career also includes sales and marketing responsibilities at facilities providing film and broadcast post production services in Toronto and Vancouver. Panavision's New York facility is a top supplier of camera rental equipment in the region, with a full staff of prep technicians and camera service experts. The New York team has serviced innumerable local productions, including Vinyl, Orange is the New Black, The Good Wife, Billions, and Blind Spot, among others. For more information, visit http://www.panavision.com, or join the company on Instagram (panavisionofficial), Twitter (@Panavision), Facebook, LinkedIn, Vimeo, and YouTube.
  10. WOODLAND HILLS, CALIF. (Jan. 11, 2016) - Panavision, the entertainment industry's leading designer, manufacturer and rental provider of high-precision optics and camera systems, has reached a distribution agreement with Ludwig Kameraverleih in Germany. The highly regarded rental facility will now be able to provide filmmakers in the region with Panavision's extensive range of spherical and anamorphic lenses, including the popular Primo 70 series for larger sensor digital cameras. This partnership deepens Ludwig's portfolio of filmmaking gear and broadens Panavision's reach. "It was important for Panavision to find a respected partner like Ludwig Kamera that shares our attention to customer service and detail," says Jeff Allen, Panavision's managing director for Europe. "Distributing our high-performance optics for digital cameras through Ludwig allows us to support filmmakers more effectively and efficiently in the region, which has seen a spike in production." Regional and national government entities have taken progressive steps to make Germany an attractive location for international productions. Increased funding and the recent announcement of the expansion of Studio Babelsberg are just a few incentives designed to draw filmmakers to the area. Ludwig Kamera has locations throughout Germany, including Berlin, Cologne, Munich, Leipzig, Hamburg and Erfurt. Martin Ludwig, founder and CEO of Ludwig Kameraverleih, and his highly skilled team have in-depth background knowledge of the German film and TV industry and are known for their high-quality equipment and services. "Teaming up with Panavision is an important milestone for us" says Ludwig. "It broadens our possibilities of service, and allows us to support national as well as international projects with the widest and best range of equipment available." Panavision has been an integral part of the motion picture and television industry for 60 years, servicing many of the big screen's most iconic films including Ben Hur, Lawrence of Arabia, and 2001: A Space Odyssey, to more recent hits as Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Spectre, and Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation, among many others. Panavision currently operates offices in key European cities, including Warsaw, Prague, Paris, Rhône-Alpes, Marseille, Brussels, Dublin, Belfast, Manchester and London, as well as fosters a network of distributors in Rome, Milan, Budapest, Madrid and Barcelona and now Germany. For more information, visit www.panavision.com.
  11. New Space is First Comprehensive Production and Post Location for Companies NEW ORLEANS (December 17, 2015) – Panavision, the entertainment industry’s leading designer, manufacturer and rental provider of high-precision optics and camera systems, has announced the opening of an expanded New Orleans location. The new 30,500-square-foot space will also house Light Iron’s first brick-and-mortar facility in Louisiana. The state-of-the-art facility represents the first location occupied by the two companies since Panavision acquired Light Iron, a leader in digital workflow solutions, earlier this year. The New Orleans location leverages the strengths of both companies to offer turnkey technology solutions from pre-production through delivery. “Panavision has been committed to serving filmmakers in Louisiana for more than a decade,” said Kim Snyder, CEO and president of Panavision. “During that time, the infrastructure and crew-base have built up significantly, and the number of projects being shot has grown such that we needed to expand our footprint to support the community’s needs. Incorporating Light Iron into the new facility brings an unprecedented level of service offerings under one roof to the local filmmaking community.” Panavision’s new high-tech space houses a full range of filmmaking equipment, and access to the company’s technicians and optics specialists. The new location also features an expanded prep floor, a private prep room for larger projects, and a 40-by-40 foot room with an 18-foot ceiling, optimized for shooting test footage. Michael Cioni, president of Light Iron, added, “At Light Iron, we’ve always believed in the marrying of camera and post production. Having Light Iron co-located with Panavision in a vibrant shooting destination like Louisiana is a case study of what the future will look like. Providing comprehensive services under one roof is exponentially more valuable when most everyone is on location. When a cinematographer or crew member has questions about workflow, we have the onsite resources available to answer them in real-time.” The Light Iron space houses a DI theater, which can facilitate remote DI sessions with the company’s Los Angeles and New York facilities. The theater can also be used for reviewing camera tests, setting looks, and screening dailies. In addition, the new facility offers offline editorial suite rentals. “We’ve worked on many great projects in Louisiana over the years with our popular OUTPOST division,” noted Cioni. “With the growing needs of customer demand there, as well as Panavision’s footprint in the state, we felt this was the right time to have a physical presence in New Orleans. The Light Iron team is very excited to be collaborating with the local film community.” “Louisiana is an important production hub for the filmmaking community,” concluded Snyder. “We made this investment to support the filmmakers in the region and this move makes it possible for us to provide a full portfolio of innovative, creative solutions, as well as physical resources and experts more expediently.” Paramount’s Jack Reacher: Never Go Back was the first project to utilize the capabilities of the new Panavision location in New Orleans, followed by an additional unit for Fox’s Scream Queens. # About Panavision Panavision Inc. is a leading designer and manufacturer of high-precision camera systems, including both film and digital cameras, and lenses and accessories for the motion picture and television industries. Renowned for its world-wide service and support, Panavision systems are rented through its domestic and internationally owned and operated facilities and distributor network. Panavision also supplies lighting, grip and crane equipment for use by motion picture and television productions. For more information, visit www.Panavision.com, or join the company on Instagram (panavisionofficial), Twitter (@Panavision), Facebook, LinkedIn, Vimeo, and YouTube. About Light Iron Light Iron, a Panavision company, specializes in mobile dailies, digital intermediate, archival, and data services for projects originated on file-based motion cameras. With additional facilities in Hollywood and New York City, Light Iron serves projects at both the independent and studio level. The company distinguishes itself by providing workflows that minimize time, maximize image fidelity, and increase creative control. Recent credits include features such as Anomalisa, Gone Girl and the upcoming Ride Along 2, commercial campaigns for Gap and Jaguar, and the television series Mom, True Nightmares, and Transparent. Follow the company on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vimeo, or LinkedIn.
  12. Hey guys, I've loved The Leftovers since season 1, but season 2 has just aired its second episode and I remain stunned by the cinematography, which is now done by Michael Grady (Todd McMullen for most of season 1). It's shot on the Alexa, but it looks SO distinct from everything and anything else I've seen shot on the Alexa, it feels like there's some kind of film grain added because there's a very real and vivid texture to the image, a real patina, the colors pop, but not in a harsh digital way, it doesn't look overly digital, it just really stands out, the lighting also looks beautiful, very colorful. I know they use Primos on this, but I wonder what anyone else think about this, any idea on the film grain or the look they're getting? I'm a film guy mainly, and the only stuff that impressed me on digital so far has been Skyfall, Prisoners, Sicario, A Most Violent Year (yet to see Selma, shot by Bradford Young as well), Drive, Elysium, The Social Network, Gone Girl, Her, Nightcrawler, The Revenant and The Leftovers.
  13. Company To Showcase Latest Advancements in Optics for Cinematography WOODLAND HILLS, CA (Nov. 9, 2015) - Panavision, the motion picture industry's most respected designer, manufacturer and provider of state-of-the-art cinema lenses and high-precision camera systems, will host two seminars at the 2015 Camerimage International Film Festival, which runs Nov. 14-21 in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Panavision's Cinematography Workshop will feature demonstrations from Markus Förderer (Stonewall), Eduard Grau, AEC (Suffragette) and Ellen Kuras, ASC (A Little Chaos) shooting various scenes that compare spherical, anamorphic and larger sensor formats. The workshop will be held November 17 from 11:00 to 13:30 in the MCK - Orzel Cinema. Later in the day, festival goers will have a chance to hear from Panavision's Dan Sasaki, VP of Optical Engineering, on the technical and artistic characteristics of Panavision's anamorphic and large format lenses, including Ultra Panavision 70. The discussion, which runs 15:00 to 16:30, will give the audience a chance to see the different aesthetic options, hear about the technical aspects of each format, and ask questions. Both panels will be moderated by industry writer Benjamin B. Camerimage attendees will also have a chance to visit Panavision in the Opera NOVA exhibit area and see an array of optics including a sneak preview of the new T Series anamorphic lenses, which are designed exclusively for digital cameras. Also on display will be an expanded offering of Primo 70 lenses, which are optimized for large sensor digital cameras. Additionally, festival goers will be able to get up close with the Millennium XL "Millennium Falcon" camera used by Dan Mindel BSC, ASC on Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and the Ultra Panavision 70 camera and lenses used by Robert Richardson, ASC on The Hateful Eight.
  14. Selling a set of Tiffen IRND's 0.3-1.8, sizes in Panavision 4x5.650". The set is 2 years old, is color matched and not faded, still in silver protective bags. Selling entire set for $1,400 ISD shipped. Available for p/u in LA, or can ship elsewhere. Please contact by email: markusmentzer@gmail.com Mfr #: 45650IRND3, W45650IRND6, W45650IRND9, 45650IRND12, 45650IRND15, 45650IRND18 Tiffen 4x5.650 Infrared Neutral Density Filters 0.3-1.8 are a combination Infrared and Neutral Density filter that reduces the amount of light passing through the camera lens without changing the color of the scene, while also reducing the amount of infrared light entering the camera. The Tiffen IR ND series is produced using Water White glass. As with all Tiffen filters, IR ND filters are ground and polished to provide the greatest level of flatness and parallelism. This, together with their exclusive ColorCore technology, ensures the highest level of optical quality.
  15. Beasts Of No Nation has just been released worldwide on Netflix today and will be in a few selected theaters in the US as well, I've seen it this morning and found it to be absolutely outstanding. Contrary to Fukunaga's previous projects (except his Sleepwalking In The Rift short shot on a 5D), this wasn't shot on film, but rather, as he said it in an interview on Hitfix, on the Alexa with Panavision C-series lenses, he talked about shooting it on super 16 at first, but there were no labs around and it would have taken a week for them to get the dailies back and it was just impossible, so he chose the Alexa. I wanted to know what you guys think about it, it looks absolutely gorgeous, very naturalistic, with those characteristic anamorphic flares, blue streaks, and barrel distortion, the Panavision anamorphic look, it also had some beautiful bloomy qualities on whites in one scene in particular, also, Fukunaga not only wrote and directed the movie, he also DPed and operated the camera himself as his camera operator pulled his hamstring one day in. Quite the astonishing feat ! See this movie.
  16. WOODLAND HILLS, Calif. (June 26, 2015) - Panavision, the entertainment industry's most respected designer, manufacturer and provider of state-of-the-art cinema lenses and high-precision camera systems, today announced the recapitalization of the company. With the recapitalization, Panavision's senior lenders unanimously agreed to convert a majority of the company's long term debt into common stock of the company. This major reduction in Panavision's debt enhances its capital structure and enables the company to explore growth opportunities. "This transaction is very positive news for the company and gives Panavision more fiscal flexibility for the future," said Panavision CEO and President Kim Snyder. "We now have a very healthy balance sheet, allowing us to accelerate our investment in equipment, technology and resources and further focus our efforts on meeting the needs and expectations of our customers." Panavision has recently extended its industry reach into the post production realm with the acquisition of Light Iron, a leader in digital workflow solutions. The recapitalization was a private transaction that was formally completed on June 12, 2015. Panavision's major shareholders have not changed, and the company's Board of Directors and executive leadership team led by Snyder remain committed to the long term growth and success of the company. # About Panavision Panavision Inc. is a leading designer and manufacturer of high-precision camera systems, including both film and digital cameras, and lenses and accessories for the motion picture and television industries. Renowned for its world-wide service and support, Panavision systems are rented through its domestic and internationally owned and operated facilities and distributor network. Panavision also supplies lighting, grip and crane equipment for use by motion picture and television productions. For more information, visit www.Panavision.com, or join the company on Instagram (panavisionofficial), Twitter (@Panavision), Facebook, LinkedIn, Vimeo, and YouTube.
  17. Apparently these are being called the "T-Series"? Panavision has pictures of two on their Twitter and Instagram. There's a 150mm T3 and a 37-85mm T2.8 zoom (front element like the two newer ones from 2007). Anyone heard anything else about these? Other lengths and so on?
  18. Hi, I'm new here and this is my first topic in this website. I came here from google search engine by a chance, but I'm so glad to find this great website. I'm a photographer and I'm using Nikon gear for my business. anyways, I was searching for filmmaking and cameras that used in Hollywood movies, but I got confused about their prices !!! please can any one explain to me why to pay 10000$ by week to rent Arri Arricam or Panavision cameras when I can buy Sony 7S with 5 great prime lenses and all filmmaking accessories in that amount of money ?? ok I know they have more options but all of them use 35mm sensor !! and the 7S have the best low light capability out there !! also, there is a lot of pro 4k cameras from Sony or Panasonic and others with reasonable prices !! can anyone please explain ? :huh: thanks very much
  19. Hello all, This is my first post to the forum and I'm glad to be here. I am an undergrad cinematography major and I will be shooting my first show on 35mm. Naturally, a gear head will be best for our studio work, but I have only worked as an assistant with the equipment. A few operators and DoPs have told me that tracing a circle on the wall with a laser pointer is a good way to start out. Does anyone have any recommendations on how I can practice? I'll have just the prep day and the test shoot day to figure out the muscle memory. (Unless I should just settle with a fluid head?) Thanks for your time in advance, -Jeremy
  20. Experienced Filmmaker to Provide Service and Support to Southeast Territory WOODLAND HILLS, Calif. (January 6, 2015) - Panavision is pleased to announce Robert Presley, SOC, has joined the company as a marketing executive covering the southeastern U.S. territory, including Atlanta, where he'll be based. Presley brings a wealth of valuable experience and industry relationships to Panavision, having spent 28 years as a camera operator and Steadicam specialist. His inside perspective of motion picture and television production will be an asset to Panavision customers whether in preproduction or finding a solution for an impromptu scenario. His credits include Ride Along 2, Flight, Pearl Harbor and Castaway, among others. Presley has also served as director of photography on such features as Beowulf, Disney's A Christmas Carol and The Polar Express. "We are excited to have Robert join the Panavision team," says Kim Snyder, CEO and president of Panavision. "His feature film and television production experience uniquely positions him to serve our customers. Robert is also deeply integrated with the filmmaking community in the southeast, having begun his career on productions that shot in Georgia and Louisiana, and returning several times to work in the region over the years." Panavision's Atlanta facility is the largest supplier of camera rental equipment in the southern U.S., with a full staff of prep technicians and camera service experts. The Atlanta team has provided equipment and services to productions such as The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 and Part 2, Fast & Furious 6, Furious 7, Ride Along 2 and Walking Dead, among others.
  21. Adding Workflow Innovator Significantly Expands Trusted Brand's Service Offerings LOS ANGELES and NEW YORK - Panavision has reached an agreement to acquire post production technology innovator Light Iron. The acquisition leverages the strengths of the entertainment industry's most respected designer, manufacturer and rental provider of high precision camera systems with the leader in digital workflow solutions, to offer turnkey technology solutions from pre-production through delivery. With facilities in Los Angeles and New York City, Light Iron will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of Panavision, maintaining its executive leadership and talent. Light Iron's popular OUTPOST Mobile Post Systems will be available at Panavision rental facilities worldwide. "This acquisition is an opportunity to leverage the strength and innovation of the Panavision brand with the entrepreneurial spirit of Light Iron," says Kim Snyder, CEO and President of Panavision. "By joining forces, we can better serve our clients, providing a full portfolio of creative choices and an efficient, seamless experience." Michael Cioni, CEO of Light Iron, remarks that Panavision is an ideal partner to extend Light Iron's international reach. "A long-standing commitment to quality and client service has made Panavision one of the most trusted brands in the world. The fusion of our two companies, and the creation of new optimized tools, will mark the beginning of a new era in digital acquisition and delivery on a global scale." Light Iron was founded in Los Angeles in 2009 by brothers Michael Cioni and Peter Cioni, along with a core team of experts. Embracing emerging digital tools for content creation from its very beginning, the company has grown into a leading provider of mobile dailies, archival services, offline editorial rental, finishing and delivery. Through both their suite of OUTPOST systems and premium DI services, Light Iron supports high-resolution 6K acquisition formats and UHD delivery. "Panavision and Light Iron are dedicated to providing clients the innovation they need to succeed at the intersection of art and science," adds Snyder. "Together, we are poised to offer creative clients a deeper and more progressive level of support and services across all market segments. This union uniquely positions us both to serve the industry through collaboration, advanced engineering and optimized services - all over the world."
  22. BYDGOSZCZ, POLAND (November 13, 2014) - Panavision, the company behind the world's best cinema lenses for 60 years, is showcasing their new line of Primo 70 lenses optimized to work with today's larger sensor digital cameras. The lenses are being exhibited here at the 22nd edition of the Camerimage International Film Festival, a premier event for directors of photography. "Panavision Primo lenses have set the standard for excellence in motion picture production for 25 years," says Kim Snyder, Panavision's president and CEO. "Now, filmmakers can combine that essential Primo character with the larger sensors found in the latest digital cameras." Panavision Primo 70s are the most advanced cinema lenses ever developed, and specifically designed to work with today's larger sensors. The result is more consistency from edge to edge and sharper corners. The organic flavor, pleasing bokeh, and gradual focus roll-off that DPs depend on have been carefully maintained in the Primo 70 series. Large format sensors are the natural next step for filmmakers looking to create powerful, affecting imagery, and Primo 70 lenses maximize their aesthetic potential. Together, large sensors and Primo 70 lenses deliver unprecedented visual impact. Panavision Primo 70 prime lenses are available in eleven focal lengths: 27mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 65mm, 80mm, 100mm, 125mm, 150mm, 200mm and 250mm. Super 70 zoom lenses are also available in three sizes: 28-80mm, 70-185mm and 200-400mm. The Primo 70 series are equivalent in size and weight to standard Primos, a feature driven by the need for portability and maneuverability on today's film sets. Primo 70 lenses have already been tested in the field under real-world production scenarios, including two feature films and several commercials. "The 70mm Primos are beautiful - just amazing," says Peter Menzies Jr., ACS about his experience using them on a feature film. "I have never seen lenses that hold their sharpness and contrast across the entire frame. ... They are also light, fast and the lens sizes in the kit are perfect. The two zooms we used are excellent -- incredibly close to the primes." "The Panavision 70mm lenses have a grand look," notes Greig Fraser, ASC, ACS who relied on the Primo 70s for a commercial shoot. "Their visual language is significantly different than 35mm. The focus falls off quickly and beautifully. As a cinematographer, this allows me to tell a different story. ... For decades, Panavision has given filmmakers exciting new tools that can open up our imagination. These lenses promise really outstanding new possibilities." Panavision's Dan Sasaki, VP of Optical Engineering, adds, "The cinematographers who have used these lenses reported that they were very happy that we didn't create something that is synthetic or too scientifically sharp. Cinematographers tell us that the character of the lens is even more important with digital cinematography. We maintained the artistry, and preserved the dimensionality that was originally designed for the Primos back in the 1990s. The Primo 70 lenses definitely share the Primo family resemblance." Panavision Primo 70 lenses are the product of state-of-the-art design and manufacturing techniques and materials, and they incorporate feedback from industry pros. Primo 70 lenses are not compatible with film cameras, as they are specifically designed to work with digital cameras. The internal mechanics retain a familiar Primo feel. Floating internal elements control breathing and allow the lens to maintain extremely high performance from infinity to close focus. Currently, Panavision has made Primo 70 mounts for the Sony F55, RED DRAGON, ARRI Alexa (standard and Open Gate), Phantom Flex4K and Phantom 65, with other cameras being assessed for compatibility. "Panavision's unparalleled experience in optical design and lens construction, and our deep and longstanding relationships with filmmakers, have all been brought to bear on these superlative lenses," adds Snyder. "Filmmakers have expressed a need for lenses that work with larger sensors in an array of cameras. We're focused on providing the tools cinematographers need to tell their stories and express their creativity." The Primo 70 series of lenses are available to rent from Panavision worldwide.
  23. Hello. I can 't seem to find enough information on the net to understand the way Panavision's single blade focal plane shutter design works. Doesn't a single blade have to move in reverse in order to shut? If so, how does it shut without creating uneven exposure? Just how fast can that blade open/close? Is it instantaneous enough that reverse shutting would't matter? I can't imagine this to be the case. When adjusting "angle" does this alter the speed at which the blade moves in any way? Or is that instead constant, with the difference being a change in how long the blade stays in it 's "open" position? Perhaps I'm totally misguided and single blade means something other than what I'm thinking? Thanks.
  24. BURBANK, CA - FotoKem recently completed the digital intermediate and post production services for the indie film Palo Alto. Working with director/screenwriter Gia Coppola and cinematographer Autumn Durald, FotoKem colorist Alastor Arnold fine-tuned the natural look created in camera to ensure the filmmakers' vision for this teen tale is reflected on the big screen. Based on James Franco's short story collection about rebellious high school kids in suburban California, Palo Alto has been praised for Coppola's coming-of-age storytelling and for Durald's evocative photography. The film, which marks Coppola's feature debut, garnered raves at the Tribeca, Telluride, Toronto and Venice film festivals before its recent release. "Gia and I had worked together on five projects prior to this feature, so we have a similar visual language, taste and sensibilities," says Durald. "Gia is from a photography background, and we pulled a lot of photographic references for the tone and mood we wanted - photos by Stephen Shore and William Eggleston. It was important to have a more filmic, softer texture to the image that harkened back to movies like The Outsiders and Dazed and Confused - something that looked more aged with softer tones in the blacks as well. And nothing overly saturated and contrasty." Durald shot the feature with a Panavised RED Epic camera, mounted with Panavision Super Speed lenses and vintage 1970s glass to give a softer feel to the image. The on-set DIT handled basic data management and adjusted stills in REDCINE-X, but no LUTs were applied. Durald's RED raw R3D files were transcoded for final color using REDlogFilm for flexibility with various film/lab emulations. When Coppola and Durald met with Arnold, they brought their look-book of still photography and suggested some films for him to watch, including The Last Picture Show, American Graffiti and The Virgin Suicides. They also experimented with different combinations of film emulation LUTs and grain treatments on various scenes from the feature. "First and foremost, they wanted a very filmic approach to keeping the image natural, smooth, and most importantly beautiful," recalls Arnold. "We weren't pushing in a hyper digital direction. Autumn's photography was awesome, a unique look with a consistency of tonality - it was in a very warm place with naturalistic skin tones." Arnold demonstrated Fuji and Kodak film emulation LUTs along with variants involving slightly different color spaces and lab processes. "We were really happy with the Kodak LUT as the base, and then we added grain over that as well," says Durald. Using the Quantel Pablo for grading, Arnold suggested using its noise treatment feature in different blending modes and intensities to give a grain pass to the entire film. "It all ran in real time, so it was really interactive and fast to adjust noise to emulate different exposures," he reports. He gave particular attention to sodium vapor night exterior shots, tilting toward warm ambers instead of greens and making sure that black levels "felt appropriate for night but didn't bury anything - you always felt you could get into them." Arnold credits Durald's talents as a DP with making the DI process more about collaboration and experimentation than fixing things. "We never struggled to match a key to another key or to even things out," Arnold notes. "It was all about finding the right feel, tonalities, densities and grain. It was great to have the filmmakers walk in with a concise understanding of where they wanted to go stylistically with the finish." Durald concludes, "Alastor has a really great eye - he understood what we were going for from the outset. It's really important to find people with the same taste and sensibilities you have who can translate your visual language emotionally and technically."
  25. At the forthcoming BSC expo in London, Carey Duffy of Tiffen UK will screen the Tiffen 4K Diffusion tests I shot for them late last year. The tests consisted of a series of simple comparisons between every brand of Diffusion filter Tiffen currently offer and serve as an excellent reference. Designed in conjunction with Steven Poster ASC the test is a simple, but very effective, starting point for a Cinematographer to compare the effect of Tiffens range of Diffusion filters before selecting specific filters to test under their own lighting conditions. We wanted to keep as many of the parameters as simple and unbiased as possible. The light is soft but not too soft to allow us to see the effect of the filter. The half light allows us to judge contrast changes, the backlight and bare bulb allow us to see blooming. Similarly the Primo primes were chosen because I felt they were a). familiar to most Cinematographers worldwide and B). sat somewhere between Master Primes and Cooke S4's in terms of sharpnes and contrast and therefore would be a better lens to showcase the effect of the filter. Shot on a Panavisied Sony F55 in 4K the tests will be presented in 4K at events around the world over the coming months. I believe the idea is that eventually Panavision and Technicolor, who co-sponsored the tests, will have copies of the 4K DCP as reference for projection in facilites around the world, so speak to your local Panavision/Technicolor rep for details, or contact Tiffen directly. For my tastes the current generation of 4K+ cameras are just too sharp, especially when projected at 4K, so for me I cant see myself shooting without some form of filtration either infront of, or behind, the lens, especially if I think the project will be projecting in 4K. I also think a lot of the diffusion filters give the image some texture, something I find lacking in most digital images. It'll be interesting to see how many people feel the same way and perhaps we'll see a resurgence in the use of Diffusion over the coming years. Regardless, these tests should still be a very useful reference for us over the next few years so keep an eye out for them. There's a few BTS images and brief video here along with a few other notes on the tests http://stephenmurphydop.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/notes-on-tiffen-4k-diffusion-tests.html
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