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Found 7 results

  1. I have never dealt with Cinelab before. I was mainly interested in their Xena 2k scans as they are better at reading underexposure and I was running and gunning at night and mainly just using a beater handheld cam I acquired and was more of a camera/scratch test and comparing scans to a certain degree. I sent in 100' of 7219 to be processed and scanned at 2k thinking this would cost around $70. I initially selected DPX but the decided ProRes would be more than fine. I tried to call and emailed Robert as soon as it went out and said I didn't update the order form to ProRes my apologies. There is no drive. I would just like an upload to Dropbox in ProRes and because I am not particularly attached to the negatives, I didn't include return shipping. Days later no response. Filled out their order form which said nothing about minimums on it and they pricing sheets are somewhat unclear and very scattered. I didn't think twice about it and figured if they had a problem they would call or reach out. I woke up this am to $161 charge. Thinking this was a mistake I reached out with an email with my form attached and also in line with the previous emails I sent before. This was the response I got: HI Charges were: $115 min charge for process and a 2K scan 2.00 for DPX frames $30 for a thumb drive for DPX frames (we don't upload DPX) $14 for UPS shipping. I can change that to ProRes and do an upload which will save $32 So 100' of 7219 cost me $161 because they never saw the email that I sent and also just started assuming things and billed me for items and services that I never was asked about. I understand that my order form was initially filled out incorrect but I tried to call and email to no avail. This honestly could have just been taken care of with a phone call or email to clarify, especially if there is no drive, no request for a drive to be purchased and at least have this brought to my attention. I talked to a few other DPs and asked them what they thought. "Shady as hell" seemed to be the general consensus.
  2. Hi All, I was just wondering whether anyone would be able to comment on their experiences with both Cinelab London and iDailies. Ideally, I'm looking for those who have used both companies and would be able to provide some kind of comparison. I understand that the differences between the two will mostly boil down to pricing and service, but I wondered whether their telecines and scans differed at all. (They do both, Cinelab in particular, have a number of option with regards to the type of scan they will give you - HD, 2K Spirit, 4K, etc.) I'd be interested to know also whether people are mainly shooting 16mm or 35mm these days. I am planning to shoot a short up in the North York Moors so if anyone has any suggestions for any labs nearer to Yorkshire that would be great, although I am not sure that there are any left! Thank you all for your help! Cheers, Shahid
  3. Greetings Everyone! Need some advice here on a sailing documentary which I have shot on S16 with an Arriflex SR3 camera. After a lot of struggles and failures, I have reached 50% of what I really wanted to achieve. Anyways, I have started assembling the footage. Cinelab Mass., has done a good job. I have the negatives scanned to 1080p HD without timecode. Few editor friends of mine suggested that I get the negatives scanned again with a timecode and then with a final cut timeline get a 2K scan and grading done the way we do for movies. I wish to showcase the documentary in film festivals. Do you think an HD output won't do justice? Generally,what formats are documentaries shown in film festivals? advice and suggestions welcome.
  4. I've been lurking here for some time, reading and doing some research. I have thousands of hours of Super 8mm home movie footage taken from 1967 to 1990 that I am looking to get transferred. I'm dealing with amateur footage that is naturally shaky from the handheld camera, has occasional focus problems, lots of panning around etc. LOTS of poorly lit indoor shots. The film itself is *ok* but it has some dirt, scratches, etc., that you would expect from 30-40 year old films that have been handled / stored by Average Joes. It also has lots of splices. After doing some research here, I came to the conclusion that my choices for the best scan of these old Super 8mm home movies was between the LaserGraphics ScanStation and the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K. I took some sample 50ft reels to Frame Discreet in Toronto and got them to do a flat scan at 5K and 2K resolution, in 16-bit DPX and ProResHQ 4444. I was very impressed with the quality. I did a number of frame-by-frame tests, and I could not justify the additional scanning cost, or the storage/data handling requirements of going with a 5K scan instead of a 2K scan - at least on the Scanstation. I have a couple of questions: How does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K compare with the ScanStation for Super 8mm home movies with lots of poorly lit indoor shots, splices, shaky footage, and the rest of the problems listed above? Are there any other scanners I should be considering? I really liked the fact that I could scan the entire film area, including the sprocket holes with the ScanStation. I hate cropping and actually kind of enjoy the "raw" look that the entire film with sprocket holes provide. Does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K scanner allow this? The Super 8mm film with sound was shot at 18fps and I'd like to get both a DPX + WAV as well as a ProResHQ 4444 outputs. Although I could find workarounds, it would make my life a lot easier if the image dequence/video was set to 18fps and the corresponding audio was synched accordingly. The ScanStation seems to do this fine, but just checking to make sure that the DCS DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K can do this as well. I did not like the sound quality of the samples I got, but I have no idea if it was due to a) the camera's sound recording ability at that time, B) the film and any possible degradation of the magnetic soundtrack, c) the scan from the ScanStation or some combination thereof. For the record, I did a few different configurations of sound formats, all lossless (i.e. WAV). I tried various combinations of bit depth and sampling rate, ranging from 24 to 32-bits, and 48 to 192 kHz. Does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K have better sound capture from old magnetic Super 8mm film? I don't hear too much discussion about Super 8mm home movie sound capture quality. Is this as good as it gets? Below are two sample screenshots from the footage I got back from the ScanStation @ 2K. I took screenshots from an indoor frame and an outdoor frame for comparison. To show off the scan in its best, I tried to pick out frames that were the most steady, for the clearest image.
  5. I've been lurking here for some time, reading and doing some research. I have thousands of hours of Super 8mm home movie footage taken from 1967 to 1990 that I am looking to get transferred. I'm dealing with amateur footage that is naturally shaky from the handheld camera, has occasional focus problems, lots of panning around etc. LOTS of poorly lit indoor shots. The film itself is *ok* but it has some dirt, scratches, etc., that you would expect from 30-40 year old films that have been handled / stored by Average Joes. It also has lots of splices. After doing some research here, I came to the conclusion that my choices for the best scan of these old Super 8mm home movies was between the LaserGraphics ScanStation and the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K. I took some sample 50ft reels to Frame Discreet in Toronto and got them to do a flat scan at 5K and 2K resolution, in 16-bit DPX and ProResHQ 4444. I was very impressed with the quality. I did a number of frame-by-frame tests, and I could not justify the additional scanning cost, or the storage/data handling requirements of going with a 5K scan instead of a 2K scan - at least on the Scanstation. I have a couple of questions: How does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K compare with the ScanStation for Super 8mm home movies with lots of poorly lit indoor shots, splices, shaky footage, and the rest of the problems listed above? Are there any other scanners I should be considering? I really liked the fact that I could scan the entire film area, including the sprocket holes with the ScanStation. I hate cropping and actually kind of enjoy the "raw" look that the entire film with sprocket holes provide. Does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K scanner allow this? I did not like the sound quality of the samples I got, but I have no idea if it was due to a) the camera's sound recording ability at that time, B) the film and any possible degradation of the magnetic soundtrack, c) the scan from the ScanStation or some combination thereof. For the record, I did a few different configurations of sound formats, all lossless (i.e. WAV). I tried various combinations of bit depth and sampling rate, ranging from 24 to 32-bits, and 48 to 192 kHz. Does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K have better sound capture from old magnetic Super 8mm film? I don't hear too much discussion about Super 8mm home movie sound capture quality. Is this as good as it gets? Below are two sample screenshots from the footage I got back from the ScanStation @ 2K. I took screenshots from an indoor frame and an outdoor frame for compairison. To show off the scan in its best, I tried to pick out frames that were the most steady, for the clearest image.
  6. As I mentioned in the Super8 thread, I have a long dreamed of project in the works: A feature that will be partially shot on Super8 film. We are shooting all of the 8mm scenes first and will edit and then see where we are at. Never mind the fact that prices for stock have gone up by 50% or more in the last 18 months :angry: there is also the issue of not receiving responses from the labs or scanning facilities I have contacted. I don't want to be rude and mention which ones, but it seems like maybe some just don't care about 8mm at this point because I am receiving replies to my emails inquiries. That would not have happened 2 or 3 years ago. Some of these places are big names and well known here. Maybe I'm just too small-time for them to bother? We intend to shoot on Tri-X, Vision3 200T and a little bit of 50D. Anywhere from 15 to 24 rolls, depending upon how well (or poorly) we do. 24fps of course. Most MOS. There are two sequences with sync sound. The most likely camera used is a Nikon R10, though I am trying to find someone with a Leicina Special or the new Logmar in the NYC area. I am in the process of acquiring an R10 right now and would have to shoot one or two test rolls. 1080p would be the minimum for scanning for the project and frankly 2K might be smarter since I really want to retain that all important film grain. That is so important. I don't want it to turn to mush. We are shooting in the NYC area late September and hope to finish no later than October 5. I would need some immediate turnaround since I have to leave for China on October 18. Getting everything in place ahead of time is important, not just for me but I am sure for whatever lab and scanning house we use. That's the situation. We have an insanely limited budget and certain people involved are trying to get me to switch to shooting this stuff digitally, but it's imperative to me that these portions of the film be shot on film. I do not want to shoot this stuff with a digital camera. The rest of the feature will be digitally captured so dammit, this material which is designed for 8mm needs to be shot on 8mm. But if I can't get answers to my questions or find a place willing to work with me... I will be forced to go digital. :( I'm all ears. Thanks.
  7. Here is a rescanned version of the 2010 Iron Guild performance at the Steel Yard in Providence, R.I. Scanned on Cinelab's new DCS-Xena 4K scanner designed and built in LA more details about the scanner to come and pricing should be on the Cinelab web site this week. -Rob-
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