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Roy Cross

Help dismantling a Steenbeck for moving

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Hello,

 

I need to move an older Steenbeck. It's been about 15 years since I did one like this. I need remove the front deck controls with the first two plates and the rewind plate so the machine will fit into the elevator. Anyone have any tips or photos of one dismantled?

 

I might be able to follow instincts but I'd rather not remove anything that doesn't need removal. I'm not sure of the electrical switches and best way to proceed. I've popped off the screen.

 

Here is a photo. Any links or leads would be most appreciated.

 

Thanks!

 

Roypost-14825-0-18949500-1531433050_thumb.jpg

post-14825-0-49181200-1531433240_thumb.jpg

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It's unlike my later 1600 which just hinges up. I'm not sure but I think you'll find the bottom plates are very securely attached- they're part of the chassis- and you may only be able to remove the front section of tabletop. Those are coachbolts which have a nut underneath.

You may get access to them if you unscrew and pull out the sound and switch panels. On the 1600 the sound panel hinges out- you just undo one screw on the right of the panel. The switch panel you may have to unscrew completely. If the front "wings" do come off they are presumably bolted to the main chassis inside and you'll need to unplug all the wiring or at least hinge the front section over.

I'll have a look at some of my old manuals and add anything useful. If you're stuck, Dwight Cody at cutfilm.com in Mass. has always been very helpful to me, although on the electronic side. I'm sure he'd offer some ideas when he has time- after all you're not asking for a freebie as I don't think he covers Canada!

Edit: catch him quick, he's on the road soon.

I hope it's going to a good home and not the dump.

Edited by Mark Dunn

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OH God, don't disassemble it other than taking the viewing head off! Believe me, you'll be sorry!

 

Get a good furniture dolly and turn the thing on end, resting the Steenbeck on the side away from the controller cards. Of course, you'll need a padded dolly of proper height to keep the deck from dragging, but that can be built-up with rigging.

 

I have moved more than a few of these older Steenbecks and disassembly is highly discouraged!

 

EDIT: Of course, remove the plates, clutch pads and core spindles before tilting the unit! Another thing; just give the transformer and drive motor a quick test to be sure they are bolted in properly and that no mounts have deteriorated or are loose prior to moving the flatbed! It's not nice when 40 to 50 LBS of copper and steel falls out onto your feet!

 

Finally; get a strong friend; actually as many strong friends as you can find. I think they raised the Bismark and used the salvaged armor plating when they made these early Steenbecks. I once burned up 4 titanium tipped drill bits trying to drill through the side of one of these to mount a non-DIN fuse socket!

 

Ah memories!

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Thanks Frank! That was my first thought (don't take the front off) when I took a closer look underneath.

 

I had thought of flipping it on its side with enough clearance for the deck but wasn't sure if the side frame would support the weight. I'll measure and investigate dolly options. Thanks for the tip about which side to rest it.

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That's an older model than my old ST1901, and it's been over 10 years since I got rid of that, but I had to move it a few times. This may not work for your model, but for the 1901, here's how Dwight Cody from the Boston Connection helped me move it.

 

Basically what we did to get it out of my third floor walk-up apartment was to remove the projection screen unit (2-3 screws, I think), and to take all the plates and core hubs off the machine (basically anything that could fall out when you flip it on its side. Then he used plastic milk crates to prop up one side and removed that side's leg from the inside (again 3-4 bolts and a couple electrical connections). Repeat with more milk crates on the other side. At this point you're left with 4 parts (two legs, the tabletop unit and the projector screen), and a box of stuff. All of this was easily movable down three flights of stairs by two people going slowly and using a set of appliance moving straps (something like this: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Shoulder-Dolly-800-lb-Moving-Straps-LD1000/204726780 ).

 

Once we got it to the first floor, we re-assembled and loaded it into the van. The whole operation took 20 minutes.

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I was going on the assumption that it was essential to reduce the depth to get it in the lift. Of course it's better not to, but I'm not suggesting anything risky.

I thought that the first few paragraphs of those instructions might be referring to installing that front panel.

The St-900 doesn't have the pedestal legs that the ST-1901 has. Just furniture legs.

I now have motorcycle ramps for moving mine, to avoid having to tip it up or anything like that. Before that, it was lifted into a car a couple of times but it was very hard work. I certainly wouldn't consider carrying it again. The ST-900 must be close to 200kg.

Edited by Mark Dunn

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Do the furniture legs unscrew? If so, with the projector off, and a simple flat moving dolly, you should be able to flip it on its back and roll it through most doorways. You might need to put a piece of plywood on the dolly since there could be a gaping hole where you remove the projector.

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The instructions only refer to fitting the castor wheels, so the legs are probably pretty permanent. But you can thread legs through a door. Roy suggests the limiting factor is the size of the lift, sorry elevator.

Moving a Steenbeck is a bit of a project. Last time mine went out I was fortunate to have two grips at the location and they treated it like the bust of Nefertiti.. It was a pleasure to watch and an object lesson in how not to strain your back or run over your feet.

DSC05012.ARW.jpg

Edited by Mark Dunn
  • Upvote 2

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I hope it's going to a good home and not the dump.

 

Thanks Mark! Someone has given it to me and I am moving it into my work space.

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Do the furniture legs unscrew? If so, with the projector off, and a simple flat moving dolly, you should be able to flip it on its back and roll it through most doorways. You might need to put a piece of plywood on the dolly since there could be a gaping hole where you remove the projector.

Yes, as you and Frank Wylie suggested I will give this a try. It feels extremely heavy, in excess of 200kg, so I was concerned about the stress on the two legs as it is tipped on its side. I'll check to see if the legs unscrew from the frame. I don't have daily access to it so will make another trip to check it out next week. The lift is fairly deep and wide but the doorway is ridiculously narrow. Thanks again so much!

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I'm willing to bet the steenbeck can handle it. They're built like tanks. But I'd watch out for any connectors and switches on the back when setting it down. I would have at least two strong people helping with this. I can think of two ways you could do it without damaging the legs:

 

1) lift it up slightly, have a third person stand where the projector unit is to help, and tip it so the back is facing down before lowering it onto a dolly, keeping the legs completely off the ground the whole time.

 

2) set up some bracing under the unit (like we did with my 1901, with plastic milk crates -- which are freakishly strong) so that the legs are off the ground by a few inches, then tip it up onto the crates and remove the legs before lifting it on to the dolly.

 

 

a good set of appliance moving straps are going to help you a lot. It's kind of amazing how much bulky, awkward weight you can carry on those with relative ease. With two sets of straps and four people, you could probably even get the whole thing lifted up off the ground, and then tip it back in the air, while it's cradled on the straps.

 

We had a 400lb stainless steel commercial style stove in my apartment, and when it died and we replaced it, the delivery guys who brought the new one, took the old stove out like it was nothing. two guys, one set of appliance straps and a flight of stairs. They barely broke a sweat (and they weren't particularly burly either).

 

It might also be worth finding out how much some piano movers would cost you for an hour's work since they probably deal with the same problems all the time...

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Thanks Mark! Someone has given it to me and I am moving it into my work space.

That's a good price.

I guess no-one there remembers how it came in?

Just a thought, probably obvious, but don't lift it by the top- it's just chipboard. Lift the frame.

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That's a good price.

I guess no-one there remembers how it came in?

Just a thought, probably obvious, but don't lift it by the top- it's just chipboard. Lift the frame.

+1

 

Pretty sure the legs do not come off. The casters will come off, but not the legs...

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Legs do not come off. Caster will.

 

I'll flip it on its side on a furniture dolly and roll it straight into the lift. Just need to make sure there is a clearance for the 3 inch edge that hangs over the side.

 

I have seen two guys move a huge freezer from my basement using those straps. Very impressive. The walked it up stairs and out a door with no hesitation.

 

I'm having it moved by the people who move things at the university I am at. I'll give them advance notice on what needs to be done and then I'll be there to show them the delicate parts. Then I'll let them do their thing.

 

I'll snap a photo during the move if I remember and post it.

 

Thanks so much for all the advice!

 

Roy

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Check inside that everything is actually fastened down. It would be a shame if the transformer or motor were to come adrift because of a loose nut or bolt. They are very heavy.

I think I'd want to check the gearbox after transit as it's possible some oil may drain out.

Oh, and buy the chaps a beer in it's allowed...afterwards.

Edited by Mark Dunn

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Well, that went poorly!

 

The university moving team relocated my Steenbeck without me being there to offer guidance. Everything arrived, Except the flatbed won't power up. Nothing. I was so frustrated and angry that I didn't try to noodle around with anything. I have not idea what happened, what shook loose, or where to start.

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I guess the chaps don't get their beer then. One would hope you'd have been told if it made any expensive noises. If not a card, then my guess is that something heavy has come adrift as I cautioned, but the odds are it's not actually broken.

That settles it- mine is staying horizontal.

I have the wiring diagrams if things get tricky.

Edited by Mark Dunn

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Yes, Mark. No beer for the team. I was shocked when I found out it had been shipped. I'll try to reach the people who were present to see if anything fell out while it was being moved. :-) I was too upset to call them at the time.

 

I made a quick inspection and everything seems intact. I checked fuses and reseated the circuit boards. I noticed that the rubber grommet that the AC cable passes through on the body was missing. It could be that the AC was yanked, and the leads to the fuses were pulled away. I did a visual, but I didn't put my hands in there to see if it was loose, nor did I put meter on it to check the line voltage. (yes, I checked the wall circuit to confirm there was current there :-) )

 

Best laid plans. I'm confident that it's a simple problem (I can't really afford an expensive one!)

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I've just had a look in mine in case there's anything obvious. There are several multi-way plugs which might have come loose. They're not a particularly tight fit - I now have mine secured with tape.

The missing grommet on the mains lead is alarming- it would take quite a bit of force to pull it out, assuming you're sure it was there beforehand. Not the sort of thing that professional movers should do unless there was an accident they're not letting on about.

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UPDATE:

Solved. Steenbeck functioning. During the move the front deck was pulled up and the multi-pin connector to the front power controls was pulled out. Plugged it back in, all good. The deck needs a bit of attention but it is minor. I'm also looking for new casters as these ones are flattening out.

Thanks so much everyone!

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Relief. My guess is they may have tried to lift it by the deck- always a no-no. I have stickers on mine saying "NO LIFT" in big unfriendly-looking letters and "LIFT" on the frame.

The casters you need are something like this.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/50mm-Rubber-Castor-Wheels-Braked-Trolley-Swivel-Caster-Brake-M10-Screw-x-4/191957817520

or whatever's available there and you probably need a 10mm. Allen key to get them off.

These may be a bit marginal for the weight, but unless you're going to make a habit of moving it (and after what's just happened I suspect you're not) they should serve.

Mine are not too good and I'll be replacing them next time out, but I was fortunate enough to have mine moved by two grips last time (it was being used as a practical prop) and they treated it like glass. Respect.

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