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Found 14 results

  1. Hi, I just want to share link to Paul-Anthony Mille´s posthouse: http://kafardfilms.fr/film-stocks-processing/ He is doing so far, the cheapest work in Europe. 16mm - 400ft = 200 € 35mm - 400ft = 150 € (Prices are for developming, cleaning and 2K/4K scanning) Development is done by Hiventy lab, Paris and Paul is doing scans at his posthouse. I have not met Paul in person yet, I just want to share this cheap and great quality alternative on market 🙂 Many people already know Paul, but for those who not, this is the solution to keep you shooting film
  2. I'm a student who is about to shoot a 5min 35mm short. The final look we are going for is one with very minimal grain and no noise. This 5207 test video shot by Kodak is a good example of what we are looking for.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCxr7YeD0C4   The key thing here is minimal grain and noise. I've been looking into various post houses and the equipment they have and came up with this list:    Fotokem - Spirit  Metro Post - Director Gamma Ray Digital - ScanStation Cinelab - Xena Nolo Digital - Arriscan FilmVideoSolutions - Spirit    I'm not too sure where to go from here. Whats the typical workflow in order to achieve a noise free and (almost) grain free result? Will data scanning instead of telecine help? Is there any post house that is recommended for this sort of thing? And do any of these post houses offer grain management/reduction that can help us achieve the look of that kodak test video?   The scans I've seen from Fotokem seem quite nice in terms of grain and noise but I haven't seen too many examples from others.   https://vimeo.com/174719862   I plan on overexposing by at least a stop to tighten grain but is there any 3rd party software that can help with grain and noise management/reduction after scanning?    Any help is appreciated! 
  3. Hey everyone! So I live in NYC and I've been shooting Super 8 as a fairly serious hobby since last summer. I love it. This forum has been a source of so much info. I've already bought several cameras, shot vacations, field trips, events, etc. Problem obviously is it ain't cheap! And even more of an issue is minimums. Given that I don't normally shoot 4+ rolls at a time, I've been forced to wait for weeks if not months while I slowly shoot more rolls until I meet the minimums. I've gotten developing from Spectra with their film+processing packs for ~$40/roll but that of course doesn't include shipping to/from costs then I have to ship it out for HD telecine unless I do it somewhere in NYC but to be honest, I prefer the pro places as their quality and turnaround is been way better than local in my opinion. Moving on, I've also just bought film locally at B&H/Adorama for ~$38/roll or Du-All for ~$32/roll then sending for processing/scanning at CineLab. That's probably my cheapest method I've found since Spectra scanning is pricey!! Anyways, even with that, I run into the minimum issue with CineLab and Spectra. With $ minimums around 200ft for processing and $150 for HD scanning, that's around 6 or even 8+ rolls before I hit the minimum. I've gotten as low as 6 rolls telecined at CineLab for around $125 which is below their minimum but I guess they just shrugged their shoulders and did it when I mailed the package. All in all, if done right and hitting minimums, I can get a roll bought/processed/scanned for around $70 if not a little less including all the shipping. I know Spectra has their "Rank-A-Roll" packages but those are pretty steep in price in comparison to doing it normally. (~$105/roll) And Yale has its "Reel Deal" packages which are $125/roll. I've also (early on in my tests) gotten 2 rolls developed and scanned as a "Test Roll" from CineLab for around $90 but I'm not sure they'd let me do that every time. So all that to say... you guys have any advice as far as best quality/price balance for low volume Super 8? Does no one else run into this issue? You guys just always shooting 10 rolls at a time? haha. Help a budget filmmaker/enthusiast out!! I know I'm kinda asking for the moon here with film costs these days but the cheaper I can get my methods, the more I will shoot! And I'm always itching to shoot more film! (Also I am very eager to hear more details about Kodak's new S8 packages in the fall. Seems like that would fix my issues if the price is right) Sorry for the wall of text. Slow day at work haha.
  4. Just wanted to take a moment to talk about a recent experience with Gamma Ray Digital. After a less-than-ideal experience with another east coast business, I talked to Perry at GRD about scanning for a short I was shooting. He was polite and answered all of my questions clearly and quickly. their pricing was cheaper than every option I found in LA, and it was simple to budget for the scan since their scanning is done by the foot, NOT by the hour. I shot about 3900' of 5-8 year old 35mm color neg for this short. It was all processed and prepped for transfer by Fotokem in LA, and I overnighted the negative and a drive to Perry as soon as it was picked up. 4 days later the drive was on my doorstep with some great 2k DPX scans of all of the film. He ground shipped the negative back to me, and it arrived unharmed and well packed. That's all!
  5. First post on this forum. I must say, having never actually worked with film before, I'm glad I found this website. Very informative. DISCLAIMER: Never having worked with film, my knowledge comes entirely from the internet, no hands on experience. So if I say anything that sounds absurd, just let me know. Having always used digital cameras, I want to shoot a movie on Super 16mm film, and have it finished on 35mm film. I've been trying to work out the workflow to get from the exposed negatives to that final print. I want to have it photochemically color timed, preferably without ever having a Digital Intermediate. Now, if I were shooting on 35mm, I would simply color time, make the inter negative, and make copies from there, all analog. But with super 16, there is the sticky problem of having to blow it up to 35mm, and from what I've read, there are many ways to go about this. There are several discussions already on this forum, but most of them are over 10 years old, and the technology seems to have changed rather significantly since then. I have an idea for some possible workflows, but I don't know if they would actually work the way I want them to or not. One of them is to edit the 16mm film together, have it color timed, then optically blown up to 35mm, but I'm not sure if the colors would translate well (I've read conflicting statements, but some say that an optical printer can't reliably transmit the colors, meaning it might have to be retimed.) If that were the case, I could have it edited, optically blown up to 35mm, then color timed, but that adds the cost of working with more 35mm in the process. For another option, and I wouldn't really mind this as long as I didn't have to digitally alter the colors, but I could edit the 16mm film, color time it, then data scan it at 4k(Not that much more expensive than 2k) then downscale it to 2k(or not, if printing 4k weren't much more expensive, but I don't know.) and have it printed to 35mm film. The problems with that, however, after it was scanned, I don't know if you would have to digitally alter the colors, or if the direct scan can be printed back without any processing. If it were the case that I would have to mess with the colors digitally anyway, then another thought was that I could edit the 16mm film, scan it without color timing, print it back to 35mm film, then photochemically color time that copy. But, that might be absurd. I don't really know, but I feel like after it was scanned, then printed, there might be some information taken from the film that makes photochemical color timing less effective, since you're just working with what a digital printer put on it, not the original analog goodness. That's a bit of a book, so I'll summarize my specific questions: 1. Assuming both processes were done properly, which would be less expensive, optical blow up, or scanning then printing back to film? (I have no reference for cost for digital printing or optical blow up. As far as I know, in this day and age, one could be far cheaper than another.) 2. Assuming both those processes were done properly, which do you think would give the best results? (Knowing that I want a photochemical timing done.) 3. Will an optical printer transfer the timed colors properly, or would it have to be timed again? 4. Will a scan of an already color timed print properly transfer the colors when printed back to film? Or would the colors still have to be digitally altered before printing. 5. Can and untimed scan that has been printed back to film still be photochemically color timed, or is that absurd? 6. Sort of related to the first question, but any reference as to how much printing 2k and 4k digital to film would cost? I can't find any information on the cost like you can with scanning. Also, specific costs of the optical blowup. I feel like some people are going to ask, "Why not just use a digital intermediate, instead of photochemically color timing? it would give you much better results, and be cheaper", and they're probably right, but it's just a hands on artistic thing. I'm relatively young, and grew up in a world that is entirely digital. Watching actual 35mm films at a theater is like a distant childhood memory, as most theaters have long been digital. And making movies with digital cameras is all I have ever done, but quite frankly, I'm at a point where I would like to create movies the same way my favorite movies from decades past were created, even if it slightly compromises visual clarity.
  6. Hey crew, Hope this isn't against any rules but figured if there was ever an audience for this, it's everyone here. So I just wanted to spread the word and ask for help for an amazing cinema arts organization here in NYC. It's called Mono No Aware and its director, Steve Cossman, has been running really fantastic 8mm and 16mm film based workshops and screenings in NYC and honestly all over the country and world for 10 years now. Most of those workshops have been out of its directors apartment in Brooklyn as well as NYC-based community darkrooms. I just want to be clear... I don't work for Mono No Aware or Steve. And have only taken a few workshops from MNA (like the 500T reversal one I documented here or b&w caffenol non-toxic processing or b&w reversal) which I loved and made me really fall in love with the format and the tangible aspect of it. Anyways, Mono No Aware is running a kickstarter to start the world's first motion picture non-profit lab here in Brooklyn, NYC to help the artist community and grow that community as well. It will feature lots of capbilities like processing, 2k scanning, rentals and more workshop space. From projects like Impossible Project's film and camera, New 55/New55 Color instant film, Film Ferrania, Kodak's new camera/processing and other film based projects, a lot of really awesome things are happening in film now that things are leveling out in terms of digital adoption. Let's make it happen! (Also donate to New55 Color if you can! I don't even have a 4x5 but donated to help keep peelapart alive) Here's a bit of info directly from the kickstarter but check it out and donate what you can. If there was ever an organization that deserves some filmmakers cash, it's MNA and Steve Cossman. That man puts his life and soul into making it thrive. MONO NO AWARE is a cinema-arts non-profit organization working to promote connectivity through the cinematic experience and preserve the technologies of traditional motion picture filmmaking. In 2015 MONO NO AWARE Organized 38 Local workshops for 420 workshop participants in Brooklyn Traveled to lead 40 Classes and lectures at host institutions for 600 participants through outreach programs Facilitated 100+ equipment rentals Distributed 50,000 feet of film stock for 1,000's of filmmakers Presented 20 artist-in person screenings for 1,000 audience members Presented the work of 33 international artists at our 9th annual exhibition to an audience of 900 over 2 nights The MONO Lab will be unique because in addition to our strong educational initiative and active screening series, we will be able to offer the services of a commercial lab, affordable facilities for continued practice, and we will increase our ability to host international artists for production of new work and presentation opportunities. With the equipment donations from a major motion picture lab, professional animation studios, and several post-production facilities, we now have the ability to provide so much more--all under one roof. With our space we can become self sustaining in our efforts to engage and play a larger supporting role within that landscape on all levels. OUR GOAL The more that we can raise through this campaign the more we can make available to a greater number of people. Increased services and facilities will include: SUPER 16MM & SUPER 8MM LINEAR PROCESSING FOR B/W & COLOR NEGATIVE FILM SUPER 16MM CLEANING AND SCANNING SERVICES SUPER 16MM & SUPER 8MM CAMERAS / LENSES / PROJECTORS / INCREASED PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT ACCESS & SPACE DRY LAB SPACE - OPTICAL PRINTING / CONTACT PRINTING / FLATBED EDITING & VERTICAL EDITING STATIONS WET LAB SPACE - WITH 24 - HOUR ACCESS TO FACILITIES INCREASED PROGRAMMING / WORKSHOPS / SCREENINGS / RESIDENCIES This is a critical point in the history of the moving image. With your help, we can make this new space a reality. Mono No Aware is a 501©(3) organization, which means your donation is tax deductable. So ya. There's my plea. I'm donating. Hope you do too! And be sure and take a workshop if you're ever in NYC!
  7. I've been lurking here for some time, reading and doing some research. I have thousands of hours of Super 8mm home movie footage taken from 1967 to 1990 that I am looking to get transferred. I'm dealing with amateur footage that is naturally shaky from the handheld camera, has occasional focus problems, lots of panning around etc. LOTS of poorly lit indoor shots. The film itself is *ok* but it has some dirt, scratches, etc., that you would expect from 30-40 year old films that have been handled / stored by Average Joes. It also has lots of splices. After doing some research here, I came to the conclusion that my choices for the best scan of these old Super 8mm home movies was between the LaserGraphics ScanStation and the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K. I took some sample 50ft reels to Frame Discreet in Toronto and got them to do a flat scan at 5K and 2K resolution, in 16-bit DPX and ProResHQ 4444. I was very impressed with the quality. I did a number of frame-by-frame tests, and I could not justify the additional scanning cost, or the storage/data handling requirements of going with a 5K scan instead of a 2K scan - at least on the Scanstation. I have a couple of questions: How does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K compare with the ScanStation for Super 8mm home movies with lots of poorly lit indoor shots, splices, shaky footage, and the rest of the problems listed above? Are there any other scanners I should be considering? I really liked the fact that I could scan the entire film area, including the sprocket holes with the ScanStation. I hate cropping and actually kind of enjoy the "raw" look that the entire film with sprocket holes provide. Does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K scanner allow this? I did not like the sound quality of the samples I got, but I have no idea if it was due to a) the camera's sound recording ability at that time, B) the film and any possible degradation of the magnetic soundtrack, c) the scan from the ScanStation or some combination thereof. For the record, I did a few different configurations of sound formats, all lossless (i.e. WAV). I tried various combinations of bit depth and sampling rate, ranging from 24 to 32-bits, and 48 to 192 kHz. Does the DCS Xena Dynamic Perf 4K have better sound capture from old magnetic Super 8mm film? I don't hear too much discussion about Super 8mm home movie sound capture quality. Is this as good as it gets? Below are two sample screenshots from the footage I got back from the ScanStation @ 2K. I took screenshots from an indoor frame and an outdoor frame for compairison. To show off the scan in its best, I tried to pick out frames that were the most steady, for the clearest image.
  8. Yes, another 16mm question :) I have two 16mm color double-perf Kodachrome prints (less than 400' each) that I've been storing at the Academy archives in Hollywood. These prints from 1965 & 1968 document two world premieres here in Los Angeles and the color & condition of the both rolls are stunning. I don't think they've ever been projected. When we found them, we originally screened them on a flatbed Moviola and thought we had color reversal film. Closer inspection of the film over the light table revealed it was, in fact, Kodachrome. My question is: what is the best way to both archive this & digitize it for use in Final Cut Pro? There is lot of discussion on the forum regarding 2K vs 4K 16mm scans, but I'm presuming this refers to NEGATIVE, not print. Any tips, pointers or advice? Many thanks :)
  9. As it looks like I will be getting either a 2K or 4K scan for my 16mm short film (and not doing a traditional A/B negative cut,) my main concern now is preserving the grain structure that I achieved in-camera. I went for a specific look with this film and pushed 7219 2 stops, creating a nice amount of grain. As I read and look online and different clips on Vimeo & YouTube, I see a lot of 2K scans that look too pristine. Not all, but a lot. So my question is will I still be able to retain that kind of gritty look with a 2K scan, or will it defeat the purpose of the original look I was going for?...
  10. BURBANK, Calif. (March 10, 2015) - FotoKem's restoration of Twentieth Century Fox's The Sound of Music will kick off the sixth annual TCM Classic Film Festival on March 26 in Hollywood. Originally released in 1965, the re-mastered version of this cinematic treasure will grace the screen of the TCL Chinese Theater IMAX as the fest's Opening Night Film, as previously announced by TCM. The movie's stars - Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer - will be on hand to introduce the film, along with Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne. Directed by Robert Wise and photographed by Ted D. McCord, ASC, The Sound of Music earned five Oscars® for Best Picture, Director, Sound, Editing and Score. The Rodgers & Hammerstein musical tells the true story of a nun (Andrews) who leaves the convent to serve as governess at the nearby Von Trapp household, where she falls in love with Captain Von Trapp (Plummer) and the family encounters dangers and eventual triumph in Nazi-era Austria. This marks the second consecutive year that a movie restored by FotoKem has opened the TCM Classic Film Festival. Last year, Twentieth Century Fox's Oklahoma! was unveiled for attendees. FotoKem completed the restoration of both 65mm classics through 8K scans from large-format film elements, down-sampled to 4K for restoration and digital cinema mastering. "The popularity of The Sound of Music is in part a testament to the power of 65mm capture," says Schawn Belston, Executive Vice President, Media and Library Services at Twentieth Century Fox, who supervised the restoration. "FotoKem's 8K scanning and complimentary digital post resulted in a stunning digital version of this timeless classic, and made our new 4K restorations of The Sound of Music and Oklahoma! a perfect fit for the opening night screening slot at a festival as prestigious as TCM's." FotoKem, which provides digital workflow and creative finishing solutions, and continues to operate one of the last motion picture laboratories in the United States, has been providing skillful restoration and preservation services for decades. Their expertise in the entire post production process makes the facility uniquely positioned to restore and deliver 65mm sourced images to today's audiences. "We're honored to have been entrusted with the job of digitizing and restoring the The Sound of Music," says FotoKem's Andrew Oran. "This 50-year-old film comes alive today in a whole new way - with a vividness and emotional impact that arguably exceeds even its original release - because of its 65mm pedigree, and the great care we've taken throughout the post process to honor that unique, ultra-high quality source." For the restoration of The Sound of Music, Oran and his team began by creating the highest quality 65mm intermediate film components possible on the facility's re-engineered 65mm contact printers. Next, those film elements were digitized at 8K on the 65mm IMAGICA scanner. FotoKem colorist Mark Griffith mastered the film from re-scaled 4K files, utilizing powerful digital tools to address quality issues present in the sourced material, such as flicker and variable color fading. "At FotoKem, we employ many of these same restoration tools and techniques on 65mm originated images week in and week out for new Hollywood features, giant screen documentaries, and theme park attractions," adds Oran. "Working with 65mm requires precision, whether the images are new or old. Whatever the vintage, we consider it our duty to retain the intentions of the original filmmakers." FotoKem is a sponsor of the 2015 TCM Classic Film Festival, which runs March 26-29. The golden anniversary of the film's premiere launched March 2 in the UK, and March 10 in the U.S. with the release of the 5-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition 50th Anniversary Blu-ray/DVD/Digital HD, which features over 13 hours of bonus content. Additionally, through a Fox partnership with Fathom Events and Turner Classic Movies, the restored film will also be shown for two days only, April 19 and 22, in over 500 theatres across the U.S. For more information about FotoKem, visit www.fotokem.com. For details about the TCM Classic Film Festival, go to http://filmfestival.tcm.com.
  11. Hi there, First post on this forum, nice to meet you. I'm looking to get some reels of 9.5mm archive film transferred. I've looked around on the internet (before finding this forum), and am now chatting to Images4Life in the UK. They seem to offer a great balance of options and price. I'm looking for a reference. Can anyone recommend their services? It looks like they're using a flashscan Choice. I'd be getting the scanning done at the full resolution, transcoded to ProRes 444. I see lots of discussion about quality on this thread. Does anyone have anything to add? Thanks! Stephen *Edit: full res would be their 2.3K
  12. February Scanning Special For the month of February, Gamma Ray Digital is offering the following special rate for Super8 and 16mm 2k scans to DPX or ProRes files on our Lasergraphics ScanStation. This is only for members of the Cinematography.com forums: 2k DPX Log scans from negative -OR- 2k DPX or ProRes flat scans (ungraded) from prints/reversal: 16mm, 16bit DPX: $0.43/foot 16mm, 10bit DPX or ProRes 4444 or ProRes 422 HQ: $0.35/foot Super-8, 16bit DPX: $0.54/foot Super-8, 10bit DPX or ProRes 4444 or ProRes 422 HQ: $0.50/foot No extra fees for optical audio capture. Low minimum order size. No fees for file copy if you follow the hard drive guidelines below. The fine print: 100' minimum for Super 8, 200' minimum for 16mm. You supply the hard drive: eSATA or bare Internal SATA in NTFS format required for DPX; eSATA, Firewire 800 or USB3 in HFS+ or NTFS for ProRes. Does not include return shipping costs. Order must be placed and film must arrive at our office before Friday, 2/28/14. Payment by credit card, PayPal or wire transfer (cash is ok if you're picking up in person). A small setup fee may apply if you have lots of short reels (50' for S8 and 100' for 16mm). Let us know how many small reels you're sending and we'll let you know the setup fees, if any. Turnaround time is typically two business days, depending on how much film you're scanning. Let us know if you've got a deadline and we'll make it work. To place an order, use our contact form (http://www.gammaraydigital.com/contact), and include the code "CINEMATOGRAPHY" in the Subject line. Let us know your cinematography.com username if it's not your real name, how much film you've got, and what gauge/type.
  13. As some of you may know, we recently acquired a Lasergraphics ScanStation at Gamma Ray Digital. We're putting together some demo videos, and would like to include as many formats as the scanner can handle. We're all set with Regular 8, Super8 and 16mm, but if you have high quality (sharp, well lit, G-rated) footage in Super 16, Ultra 16 or Max 8, please send me a PM. We're looking for things like landscapes/cityscapes, architectural footage, nature footage, slow motion or timelapse. Basically, footage with relatively little camera motion so that we can easily put titles over it. In exchange for letting us use your footage on our website and YouTube/Vimeo channels (with credit, of course), we'll scan a couple rolls (50 footers for Max8 or 100 footers for Super/Ultra16) at no charge to 2k DPX, TIFF or ProRes files - your choice. As a thank-you, we'll also give you a deep discount rate on additional scanning. We can only offer this to the first couple of people who send us film in each format, so if you do have this kind of footage, please let me know so we can make arrangements. Here's an example of one of the videos we've already made: I hope this doesn't come across as spammy - we're really just looking for some footage to show off the machine and I'm too impatient to wait for the right material to come along! Thanks! -perry
  14. Hey guys, Apologies if it's been covered already. I'm in talks with a post house here in Melbourne, Australia to get some 16mm film scanned to a 2K ProRes file so I can edit it. She is telling me that the telecine process is $450/hour then the 'digitisation' is an additional $250/hour. I was under the impression that telecine IS the digitisation of film? Am I wrong on this one? Is it a two stage process? If it is then what would be the point of doing a telecine without the aforementioned 'digitisation'? Thanks again!
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