Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Timothy Fransky

Bell & Howell Model 627 manual

Recommended Posts

Here's a few photos of my newly acquired B&H 627, which must be the UK/Commonwealth/Euro version of the 240T. All the text is in English, French, German, and Italian(?). I'm pretty pleased with the condition.

 

It came with the standard 20mm Super Comat lens, plus a TT&H 2.8" f2.8. They both have matching Filmo finder lenses. The 2.8 finder lens is full of small, black speckles. I don't suppose it matters terribly since it's only used for broad framing.

 

Does anyone have any advice for running a test to see if it's working ok?

 

I've posted the manual on my google drive for anyone looking for a copy.

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ivQFdVVpNo9GoojMP2YuQPrENiAZoJUR/view?usp=drivesdk

Edited by Timothy Fransky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have some expired film you can run it through the camera to practice loading and see how the transport is functioning. Make sure the gate and pressure plate are clean. After a few feet have run through, take out the film and check it carefully for any scratches. Run the dummy film through a whole spring wind and check if the speed seems to slow down towards the end. Spring motors will often slow down a little, but if it slows down a lot it either the camera needs lubrication, or it's tired or worn.

 

You can check the take-up tension by holding the take-up spindle (the bottom one that holds the spool that winds the exposed film on) while running the camera. You should be able to hold it and stop it spinning with a bit of finger pressure. It should slip smoothly, not jerkily. It needs to slip, because as the spool winds on more film, the diameter expands and it needs to turn slower. The film itself pulls on the spindle to make it slip, so it shouldn't be really stiff or jerky. If it slips too easily, the film won't be snugly wound onto the spool.

 

Ultimately, shooting a test roll will be the best way to check how the camera and lenses are working.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the B&H 627, the size and weight of the camera is very good, when fully wound it lasts a long time. I have not used the lens that came with it but have been using other c mount lenses;

 

 

Pav

Edited by Pavan Deep

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the B&H 627, the size and weight of the camera is very good, when fully wound it lasts a long time. I have not used the lens that came with it but have been using other c mount lenses;

 

 

Pav

You're undercranking- is that intentional or is the camera running slow?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the camera's speed settings they're are quite off.

 

Pav

 

How do you determine this?

 

I noticed there are notches on the dial to line up with another on the body. I assume those notches are closest to the noted fps.

 

You seem to be able to set the dial anywhere you like between the notches as well, which adds to the confusion.

Edited by Timothy Fransky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have some expired film you can run it through the camera to practice loading and see how the transport is functioning. Make sure the gate and pressure plate are clean. After a few feet have run through, take out the film and check it carefully for any scratches. Run the dummy film through a whole spring wind and check if the speed seems to slow down towards the end. Spring motors will often slow down a little, but if it slows down a lot it either the camera needs lubrication, or it's tired or worn.

 

You can check the take-up tension by holding the take-up spindle (the bottom one that holds the spool that winds the exposed film on) while running the camera. You should be able to hold it and stop it spinning with a bit of finger pressure. It should slip smoothly, not jerkily. It needs to slip, because as the spool winds on more film, the diameter expands and it needs to turn slower. The film itself pulls on the spindle to make it slip, so it shouldn't be really stiff or jerky. If it slips too easily, the film won't be snugly wound onto the spool.

 

Ultimately, shooting a test roll will be the best way to check how the camera and lenses are working.

 

I don't have any 16mm film, dummy or otherwise just yet. That's next on the list. Fortunately it's not any more or less expensive than super 8.

 

I'll probably start with Orwo UN54. It's the cheapest option for me.

 

I tell a lie, I can get Kodak 3378 or 7363 for $18 per 100'. I'd just as soon avoid the sound neg tho.

Edited by Timothy Fransky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for setting the speed at 24 I think the best way to ensure getting 24 is by setting speed knob in the middle aligning it to the arrow [setting mark]. As for empty spools ask your local lab.

 

Pav

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  


  • Rig Wheels Passport



    Ritter Battery



    Abel Cine



    Serious Gear



    The Original Slider



    CineLab



    Broadcast Solutions Inc



    FJS International



    Glidecam



    Tai Audio



    Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS



    G-Force Grips



    Visual Products



    Gamma Ray Digital Inc



    New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment



    Metropolis Post



    Paralinx LLC



    Wooden Camera



    Just Cinema Gear


    Cinematography Books and Gear
×
×
  • Create New...