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Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

Removing static from records

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After cleaning records I get lots of static. I've been using the Robert Crumb method of washing records with clean water on a damp cotton rag and drying with soft rag. Although Crumb uses lots of soap on his records as well as water. (as shown in a vintage video of him.)

After cleaning I touch the edge of the record to the refrigerator handle a few times until it stops sparking. Seemed to help greatly reducing dust magnet syndrome.

The anti anti-static brush does very little as far as I can tell to remove static. (other than finish dusting after the static is removed.) The brush must be designed to not add more static. I test removing more static when flipping the record and brushing, but have not found any buildup from playing and brushing once static is previously discharged.

You got any static removing tricks? Lets hear them.
 

R.Crumb by Sebastien Gokalp.jpg

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Cleaning vinyl records is not always so easy.  I have a small record collection and some of the records have been dirty since they were brand new.  The crap in the grooves can be really stuck and not so easy to clean.  And tap water can leave residue which sounds really bad.  I think if you are washing your records you should use distilled water, a tiny bit of soap, and a good brush that can reach deep in the grooves.  And maybe some Photo Flo solution (just a few drops) in the rinse.

Test first on a record you don't mind ruining! 

I have a digital capture software called "Vinyl Studio" that after digitizing the record has some good tools to help remove unwanted sound from the digital recording.  It can be quite effective actually.  You'll also need an analog to digital capture device to digitize your records.

In the end, I find it near impossible to tell the difference between my digital captures of vinyl records from the original vinyl recordings, though I'm sure, true vinyl purists will say otherwise 🙂

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The best way by far to clean records is with an actual record cleaning machine using the correct fluids. Then change the sleeves for anti static sleeves. I have also had good success removing static with a Zerostat anti static pistol but I'm not sure they make them anymore. It is  some years since I went through all my records and cleaned them with my Nitti Gritti cleaner. There are various machines at varying prices depending on how much automation you want. They all basically vacuum the cleaning liquids off once the cleaning process has been completed. I think there might even be an ultrasonic cleaner these days.  I don't think the method you described is a good way at all. 

Edited by Patrick Baldwin

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On 11/16/2019 at 10:53 AM, Bruce Greene said:

Cleaning vinyl records is not always so easy.  I have a small record collection and some of the records have been dirty since they were brand new.  The crap in the grooves can be really stuck and not so easy to clean.  And tap water can leave residue which sounds really bad.  I think if you are washing your records you should use distilled water, a tiny bit of soap, and a good brush that can reach deep in the grooves.  And maybe some Photo Flo solution (just a few drops) in the rinse.

Test first on a record you don't mind ruining! 

I have a digital capture software called "Vinyl Studio" that after digitizing the record has some good tools to help remove unwanted sound from the digital recording.  It can be quite effective actually.  You'll also need an analog to digital capture device to digitize your records.

In the end, I find it near impossible to tell the difference between my digital captures of vinyl records from the original vinyl recordings, though I'm sure, true vinyl purists will say otherwise 🙂

That is helpful advice. I will look into it. Yes water is filthy nowadays. Here are the water test photos from around the country. Also are photos of test results from water filters.

https://danielteolijr.wordpress.com/2016/01/18/6035/

I never gave much thought to water on the records. But if you want the best, then distilled is cleanest. They do sound better once they are cleaned for cracking and popping noises.

Edited by Daniel D. Teoli Jr.

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On 11/16/2019 at 1:50 PM, Patrick Baldwin said:

The best way by far to clean records is with an actual record cleaning machine using the correct fluids. Then change the sleeves for anti static sleeves. I have also had good success removing static with a Zerostat anti static pistol but I'm not sure they make them anymore. It is  some years since I went through all my records and cleaned them with my Nitti Gritti cleaner. There are various machines at varying prices depending on how much automation you want. They all basically vacuum the cleaning liquids off once the cleaning process has been completed. I think there might even be an ultrasonic cleaner these days.  I don't think the method you described is a good way at all. 

I don't like chemicals, so go with water. They got some systems on Amazon with proprietary non disclosed chemicals. Who knows what it is they use?

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6 minutes ago, Daniel D. Teoli Jr. said:

I don't like chemicals, so go with water. They got some systems on Amazon with proprietary non disclosed chemicals. Who knows what it is they use?

This might help: https://blog.discogs.com/en/side-by-side-test-vinyl-record-cleaning-solutions/

I cannot remember what solution was in my Nitti Gritti setup. It is a long time since I cleaned them and haven't needed to do it again since.

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