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Marco Leoncino

Eastman Double-X 7222 16mm home processing

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Dear all,

I was making a search in the forums and in the web, in order to find updated information, but I didn´t find what I was searching. Therefore I have opened this new topic.

I have learned how to develop the kodak Tri-X 7266 film and, in particular, the B&W inversion process (with a Lomo tank). Paradoxically, I am thinking to use a negative B&W film, for my future projects, because I need more latitude. I was thinking to process the Kodak 7222 at home, in the Lomo tank.

The question is the following:

is it possible to develop theEastman Double-X 7222 in Kodak D-76, or it is much better to use the D-96?

D-96 is usually used stock, but I guess that D-76 should be used 1+1. Does anyone has some starting points?

Can you please help me?

Thank you very much!

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27 minutes ago, Marco Leoncino said:

Dear all,

I was making a search in the forums and in the web, in order to find updated information, but I didn´t find what I was searching. Therefore I have opened this new topic.

I have learned how to develop the kodak Tri-X 7266 film and, in particular, the B&W inversion process (with a Lomo tank). Paradoxically, I am thinking to use a negative B&W film, for my future projects, because I need more latitude. I was thinking to process the Kodak 7222 at home, in the Lomo tank.

The question is the following:

is it possible to develop theEastman Double-X 7222 in Kodak D-76, or it is much better to use the D-96?

D-96 is usually used stock, but I guess that D-76 should be used 1+1. Does anyone has some starting points?

Can you please help me?

Thank you very much!

According to Massive Dev Chart,

DoubleX in D76 1+1 (ISO 250) should be 10min at 20C

DoubleX in D76 1+2 (ISO 250) should be 12min at 22C

DoubleX in D76 1+1 (ISO 250) should be 10min at 20C

DoubleX in D76 1+3 (ISO 250) should be 20min at 22C

You should get this app, it's the best I know out there for recipes. I use it on iOS but i'm sure it's on android as well. 

They also have a website and this is what they have for 5222 in D76

https://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php?Film=%Kodak+Double-X%&Developer=%D-76%&mdc=Search&TempUnits=C&TimeUnits=D

 

 

 

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My latest developments using 7222 were in D-76. Low contrast was wanted. Three tests were made. Here is a link to pictures with descriptions. Today I printed the entire roll onto 3378, another set of chemicals and procedures that took 2 tests. 

 

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Dear Michael, 

thank you.

With 1 to 2 you mean one part of D76 in two parts of water?

D96 would have caused more contrast? Or which other difference?

 

 

 

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Aside from saving money, a big part of the appeal of home processing would be the option of NOT having to use a typical solvent-type developer (high-sulfite D96, D76 and others) and open it up to experiment with staining developers (pyrogallol or catechol), acutance developers (Rodinal & co.), etc.

 

Does the tank develop evenly or is there flicker in the moving image?

 

-Jarin

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Nik and Trick (UK) sell the D96 developer and F6 fixer for that film...made by Bellini

https://ntphotoworks.com/product/bellini-d96-fixer-f5-kodak-double-x-package-deals/

Also....Eastman Double X has little latitude in my experience.....I used it on this personal project and my exposure had to be within like 1/2 stop to be 'on'....this is MY experience with the film.....not saying its universally correct for everyone as I guess depends how you light it etc.

I particularly found that for exterior shots you have to be spot on with the metering esp. in bright conditions with the sun full on. I rated it at 250 iso like Kodak says and for me this is accurate. I lit the main close-ups with a Multiblitz V6 LED light on a rectangular soft box....the bed and shower scenes with the light coming in from an Arri Plus 1000w tungsten and the beach part with bright sun

In my experience, using Double X is like using E6 film when it comes to metering....but what a beautiful beautiful stock it is....

I did this with it....Cinelab London processed and scanned for me.

 

Edited by Stephen Perera

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