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Inaugural test footage from a new variation of the Ultrapan8 system called UP8 3.1


Nicholas Kovats
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We have diverged the UltraPan8 system into two systems.

 

The initial prototype using the full 16mm width of Regular film stock with 8mm pulldown shall be referred to as UltraPan8 2.8 which now includes the specific aspect ratio (2.8) as per the nomenclature. The new variation shall be referred to as UltraPan8 3.1 which utilizes the full 16mm width of Double Super 8 film stock with Super 8mm pulldown.

 

The imaging area has been increased by 39% due to the smaller Super 8mm perforation dimensions relative to UP8 2.8 R8. The UP8 3.1 DS8 frame width is greater than Super 16mm, i.e.

 

1. UP8 2.8 (Regular 8) AR = 1:2.8, FRAME = 10.52mm x 3.75mm, AREA = 39.45 square mm

2. UP8 3.1 (Double Super 8) AR = 1:3.1, FRAME = 13.00mm x 4.22mm; AREA = 54.86 square mm

 

The resultant frameline is thinner. Mechanical interplay between transport components such as claw, pressure plate and sprockets are more critical than UP8 2.8.

 

The base camera conversion relies on the original JK Camera Double Super 8mm conversions of factory Bolex H8 cameras. Bolex H16 optical components and aperture are also used. A new milled gate is part of the conversion as with UP8 2.8 Bolex cameras.

 

This is a true hybrid system in the sense that no native 16mm wide Double Super 8 projectors are known to exist with the possible exception of special contact printers. This is a genuine "originate on film and finish on digital" camera system.

 

Relative to the image sequence JPEG deliverables...actual overscan pixel density has been increased to 2,440 x 880 from 2,080 x 780 (UP8 2.8)

 

Here is the inaugural scanned test footage with Ektachrome 100D reversal film and a Carl Zeiss 10mm f2.0 Tevidon lens, i.e.

 

The smaller Double Super 8mm perforations are very evident in the overscan verison, i.e. https://vimeo.com/45622450. Compare this to the UP8 2.8 R8 overscan example,i.e. https://vimeo.com/27492482.

 

Here are some frameshots for your examination, i.e. http://picasaweb.goo...&psc=G&filter=0

 

Thanks again to Jean-Louis Seguin (bolextech@gmail) for another excellent implementation and to John Gledhill at bitworks.org for another outstanding scan. Processing was by Niagara Custom Labs here in Toronto.

 

I would like to point out some key concepts. The UltraPan8 system is about maximizing the image area to provide the best small format experience from our admittedly ultrawide bias. Irrespective of film perforation specifications. A native spherical film format that uses the best part of standard 16mm optics (center) and doubles the magazine run time relative to 16mm. We love large screen cinema and I suspect we have minimally provided an excellent extraction process for the classic and smaller Cinemascope aspect ratio of 1:2.4.

 

As our beloved Super 8 camera crumble to dust...our decision to use plentiful, all metal and robust Bolex cameras is indicative of our longterm intentions.

 

Regards,

 

Nicholas Kovats

Toronto, Canada

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Thanks, Steve.

 

No I haven't but from a practical standpoint it does not interest me in terms of ease of conversion. Are Canon Scoopic Super 8 and 16mm parts interchangable? That is a key consideration. Plus the Scoopics do not have a factory interchangable lens mount. I suspect the Scoopic was designed by Canon's Super 8 engineers as it reflects it's pedigree.

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The colors are outrageously saturated and unnatural and the contrast is excessive.

 

As the images are sharp only in the central part of the frame, the interest of the Ultrapan is greatly reduced.

 

A Bolex Moeller Anamorphot would probably give best result on a unmodified 8 mm Bolex.

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Hi Joel,

 

Can you please post a link to your evidently superior cinematography? Your arrogance notwithstanding there many people shooting E100D which happens to be one of the most common Regular 8 and double Super 8 film stocks available. My V3 50D test footage is forthcoming but it may be too late as I appear to have been "outed" by the old guard. But hey. It has been getting rather stale in here. En garde!

 

Nicholas

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The colors are outrageously saturated and unnatural and the contrast is excessive.

 

As the images are sharp only in the central part of the frame, the interest of the Ultrapan is greatly reduced.

 

A Bolex Moeller Anamorphot would probably give best result on a unmodified 8 mm Bolex.

 

 

To Joel Pierre,

 

None of your comments has anything to do with the film format.

 

They reflect the characteristics of the film stock and the lenses used.

 

Jean-Louis

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The black levels are crushed which then affects the color saturation. At times there does appear to be a focus issue on the far sides of the image. I am guessing this occurs when the f-stop is near wide open. I have had the same issue when I shoot time-exposure footage with my Eumig Super-8 camera. I try and not go below a 2.8 / 4.0 split to assure better focus throughout the full range of the time-exposure image.

post-1160-0-93633300-1342421035.png

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