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Federico Torres

Le Mans

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Hello I'm new to this forum, I have a question for you; a friend sent me a photo backstage of "Le Mans" (1971 Dir: Lee H. Katzin, DOP: Renè Guissart Jr. and Robert B. Hauser)

387378_2814516374130_1595441454_32553973_2101256556_n.jpg

I cannot identify the camera in the photo, which model of camera is it?

 

thank you!

f.

 

P.S.

I hope that this is the right section.

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Well,

 

"Le Mans" (1971) is credited as having been shot in 35mm Panavision, but the camera in the pic looks like the Panavision 65HR, a handheld 65mm camera.

 

The whole rig resembles what was used in "Grand Prix" (1966) except Panavision indicates the 65HR wasn't introduced until 1968...the cams in "GP" sure look like this one, though (you can see the operators walk through several crowd scenes) :huh:

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They may have used a 65mm camera to avoid using anamorphic lenses. "The Battle of Britain" used 65mm cameras for the aerial shots, although the film is 35mm Panavision.

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Are you sure that picture is from "Le Mans" ?I was one of lots of camera ops. on that film very young and my first time with Panavision Anamorphic .It was a long shoot with lots of Crew and Director changes i never did see or use a 65mm camera .

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John,

 

Nice to hear from one of the original participants.

 

I suddenly remembered from the extras on the Blu-Ray of "Grand Prix" that they did indeed use a Ford GT as the main chase car, and here is a snapshot off the screen. It looks like the same set-up (different lens and mag) and the same car...

 

GPChaseCar.jpg

 

It still doesn't solve the mini-mystery for me about how this camera, which looks like the 65HR, was used on this film two years before Panavision's web site says it was released. Would a director really take on "beta-testing" of a rig under such conditions or am I mis-identifying the camera?

 

Claus.

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It still doesn't solve the mini-mystery for me about how this camera, which looks like the 65HR, was used on this film two years before Panavision's web site says it was released. Would a director really take on "beta-testing" of a rig under such conditions or am I mis-identifying the camera?

 

Claus.

 

That mag doesn't look wide enough to be 65mm to my eye.

Could it not be an eyemo with a 400ft mag and electric motor?

 

Definitely doesn't look like the photos of the 65hr that I have seen!

 

love

 

Freya

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Here's a possible 65mm camera that could be around for Grand Prix.

 

http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/panavisn.htm

 

 

I think you have found it Brian!

It looks exactly like the 65mm "standard" camera to my eyes!

The mag has the same look about it and the flat circular frontage!

I think that is it!

 

love

 

Freya

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Freya its a none reflex handheld 65mm Panavision camera no doubt about that.

 

You would know better than me for sure John!

 

Always amazed at the stuff you worked on!

You didn't do any Kubrick films did you?

or work on the elephant man or Dune?

What about "Prospero's Books", or "Orlando" or "the last of england" or "the tempest"????

 

love

 

Freya

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Yes he is right the reflex 65mm was 1968 the one used on Grand Prix was the non reflex hand held . The same one Kubrick used a lot on "2001"in 1966/67.

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There'a a story about Kubrick using the studio camera handheld, supported by many crew, for the shot of the astronauts descending into the TMA-1 excavation. That doesn't have to be true; its presumably unnecessary. Unless GP had all the handhelds- it would have been early '66.

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Grand Prix was released in 1966 so was prob. shot the year before . No way you could do the shot you are talking about handheld with the studio Panavision 65mm monster camera.

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There'a a story about Kubrick using the studio camera handheld, supported by many crew, for the shot of the astronauts descending into the TMA-1 excavation. That doesn't have to be true; its presumably unnecessary. Unless GP had all the handhelds- it would have been early '66.

 

Kubrick shooting with the hand held 65mm camera can be seen reflected in an astonaut's helmet in the close shot after they've

gotten off the ramp.

 

He also shot flying bone with the hand held camera. Two of the few actual exterior shots.

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