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Jingtian Wang

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About Jingtian Wang

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  • Occupation
    Cinematographer
  • Location
    Frankfurt

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  1. Personally never had to budget or crew to go for one of these pieces. But from the numerous rental house visits I've had, it's clear the higher end house stock mainly Arri equipment and mid to lower tier ones stock third party. I suppose (but not 100% sure) this is because DPs on high end productions have more budget and less time, so they are willing to pay for the Arri to ensure quality and save time in prep. Where as mid - low end jobs have smaller budget so the DP needs to get smarter, and third party equipment is often just as good but some research needed for compatibility. And far as I know, almost all shows now days uses Teradek as their wireless video with very few exceptions on very high end using Arri. It can be argued that Teradek is just as good if not better than Arri. Demand for Teradek should be pretty high, as many DP would book them even on lower end jobs to impress clients. You didn't post much else on what you already have and the market you are in, so it's hard to recommend beyond what you've asked. But if you've been renting out for a while, you should look into the record of what's popular and pay attention to what clients request the most. And make a informed decision form that. The rental market is tricky now days and hats-off to you for taking the risk.
  2. That's a fair point and all, but what if you can literally create any set, subject and story as you wish (ignore all limits of physics); imagine you are getting the shot for your reel and your reel only. Like on "Dream Job, Massive Budget, would you Shoot Film or Digital". Would you prefer a wide or tide shot?
  3. Title says it all; do you prefer a wider or tider lens? And why? Imagine a clean a slate, you have total creative freedom and no need to "suit the scene". Make it interesting.
  4. By my understanding, you are making a one-off, non-commercial, just for fun production right? If this is the case I don't really advice you to go any buy any of the stuff you mentioned. It would be a few thousand dollars, and unless you are making money off of it, it's not worth it. In this case I would recommend you simply go ahead and rent, it might seem like spending few hundred per day is expensive, but it's actually very affordable for the quality you are getting. You can rent on weekends and only pay for one day, or rent for whole weeks and paying for 3 day/week. I don't really know where to go as I live in Europe, manye someone based in states can help. Bt in any case, 1080p is more than enough , and 60p is nice for some slow-mo. Wouldn't recommend get anything more than that. If you do plan to shoot for many days (for more than 10 days) or plan to do multiple projects in future, then I would recommend you look into a company called Aputure for lights, their lights are very high quality and affordable (they are also coming out with a full RGB panel mid 2020). And stay away from Tungstens, they are old tech and suck a ton of power, it's easy to trip a breaker with them unless you know what you are doing. One exception is to buy used tungsten from rental houses, they're moving onto LEDs and are selling off their old Tungstens for pennies (like a 650w for $100), tungstens are built like tanks so age doesn't matter. One thing I would recommend you to buy is a good on camera monitor, it's the only thing many DPs own now days, as you can always rely on your monitor. You generally learn your monitor better with time and it really speeds up your workflow. Something like the small HD 702 or focus 5. You can find used ones for cheaper, but their prices have came down a lot now days. One last tip is to go a talk to your local camera rental houses, they can offer you deals on used gear. Finding a good one can go a long way when it come to renting.They also can teach you how to pick out a kit - lesson that are way too long for a forum post. They are is most cases very friendly, even if you don't seem high value to them - find a new one right away if they hostile to you because you aren't high value. Anyways, welcome to the forum and feel free to post any questions you have. But always search if it has been posted before you ask. Many questions have already been answered. Here's a few links that might help:
  5. You do have to consider that SLRs back then shoots film, so they generally have much less exposures on them due to the much higher per shot cost. I suppose most SLRs from back in the days don't have that many exposures on it, since even something like 5000 exposures would mean 140 rolls of 36 frame film, suppose very few shoots that many. Whereas today digital means many DSLRs are going through way more, and they certainly do fail. There's even a website for people to check how many exposures a given model's shutter might last (shuttercheck.app). But I digress.
  6. Seriously? They didn't see the problem of shooting live bullets indoors? Could you give more details on the production? Feels like a interesting story we should all hear. 🙂
  7. Personally is probably rentals breaking. Since I'm just starting out and working in indie space, most of my projects doesn't have a budget for the deductible part of insurance (anywhere from 500 to 1000 euros). It hasn't yet happened to me, but if something were to break, thing will probably get sticky. I try to minimize the chance of this by renting from reputable rental houses, and stick to reliable brands....Arri, Cooke, Sachtler etc (no REDs). It cost a bit more up front but much better than anything breaking, and I suppose bigger rental houses also are better at dealing with small damages. Weather is anothering that stresses me out all the time, since I've no control over that whatsoever. If a scene is planned to be sunny, and it's overcast, the only solution is to 1)wait for god knows how long or 2)change the script, which is much easier if the director als wrote it. Either way I'll need to forget everything I planned about the shoot.
  8. Good to know I'm not the only person thinking this way... :), I had the exact same idea. Though I have to put on a matte box and monitors since ....clients.
  9. I was thinking about using a rod mounted mattebox and no lens support, since my rental house for some reason only carry 19mm lens support. This avoids me from adding a bp8 to the system. Would that work?
  10. My other option would to get the Angenieux ez1, which is much lighter and would probably run fine on a 15mm system with only the mattebox supporting it. Would would this make the handheld thing easier?
  11. thanks a lot guys, I'll let y'all know how it goes if they accepts me.
  12. A bit of background, I'm justing starting out in my career and I'm looking to learn the equipment and make some contacts. I was talking to a local rental house about a upcoming rental, and they told me about staff on vacation and them being busy (to explain why they didn't reply in time). This lead me to the idea of helping out for few days to gain experience as I'm free around christmas, no school and aren't much productions I can work on either (most of them are German speaking and I don't speak German well enough). The problem is that since I'm also a customer there, would this complicate anything? Have anyone worked at and rented from the same rental house? There's only two rental houses in Frankfurt Main, and I've rented from both, so I can't find a new house. Any tip is well appreciated.
  13. Would a EVF extension work for this? Since my rental house includes this in the package.
  14. I have a upcoming shoot where there's some budget to splurge, and I was able to fit a amira and cooke 20-100 t3.1 in the budget. I will be shooting handheld about 60% of the time. The lens is about 7kg (14.6ib) heavy, and the rental house is asking me whether I really want to shoot handheld with this combo. Could anyone who shot with lenses in this weight range tell me if it's hard to do so? ALso, would a 15mm lens support work for this system? They are insisting on a 19mm system, but I want to shoot with the WPA-1. Thanks in advance J
  15. Another interesting I found out about was during one of Larry's interview, where he talked about using Canon, Nikkor and some Leica lenses in joker to get certain looks. And I guess this explains parts of why LF was used...I suppose Larry were talking about still lenses, since Nikkor never made cine lenses. Which means they will cover LF's full frame sensor and still maximize the dof. But this makes it more confusing since as Manu said, the LF was only used on steadicam and mini was only used when the other were too big. Was it a coincidence that these are the exact shots Larry wanted with these lens? Seems unlikely to me, but possible. Or these lenses might have image circles larger than the advertised full frame, as with many lenses and Larry just knows more than I do (statistical certainty).
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